Afghanistan

Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) In Afghanistan: Final Evaluation

CARE has been a major player in the education sector in Afghanistan since 1994 implementing CBE programs. The overall aim of CARE Afghanistan’s education projects is to provide greater access to quality basic education for school age children, with a specific focus on girls, in remote areas of Afghanistan where Ministry of Education (MoE) schools are not accessible. To cater to cultural norms, the programs have provided culturally acceptable, quality community based educational opportunities to particularly attract girls and assure their families of a safe, acceptable learning environment. The program puts major emphasis on helping communities gain the skills and knowledge they need to take their children’s education into their own hands. Women are encouraged to play a key role. Bringing positive attitudinal and behavioral changes in communities towards girls’ education and retention of female teachers substantially increases the sustainability of the schools and girls’ access for their future positive engagement in society. CARE’s projects are currently providing educational opportunities to more than 18,000 children across six provinces. CARE’s CBE work has contributed significantly to the shaping of CBE policy in Afghanistan, as CARE continues to work in close coordination with the Ministry of Education (MoE) and collaboratively with NGOs through different CBE consortia working across the country. The Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) was part of a larger endeavor of the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effect in Community Based Education (ALSE) research project. A similar parallel community-based education (CBE) program was being implemented by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in the provinces of Herat, Ghor, Daykundi and Bamyan. The project goal was to enhance increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. The evaluation provides an opportunity to gain a wider understanding of the overall achievements of the project and how the key evaluation questions of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and impact have been answered. Read More...

Community Based Education Project

This evaluation assessed the project "Community-Based Education" (July 2011 – June 2014). The project aimed at facilitating government delivery of quality basic education (grades 1-9) in 120 community-based classes (96 primary and 24 lower secondary) to 3,154 children, living in areas where public education services are not available in Ghazni, Kapisa and Khost provinces.
The evaluation took place from September to November 2014, with fieldwork in October 2014. It involved a total of 464 participants (42% female) through an on-line self-assessment questionnaire, beneficiary survey and in-depth interviews in Kabul and around a random sample of 44 CBE classes in the three provinces. All data and steps used for the sample selection, data cleaning and analysis
can be fully reproduced with the codebooks presented in the annexes to this report.
The results indicate that the project is highly relevant considering the needs and priorities of its target groups, as well as CARE's Policy Strategy Framework and the policy scenario. Read More...

RESPONSIVE AND ACCOUNTABLE PROCESSES FOR INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT (RAPID)

This report constitutes the final evaluation of the Responsive and Accountable Processes for Inclusive Development project (RAPID), implemented in Balkh (Charkent and Khulm districts) and Parwan (Bagram and Jabulseraj districts) provinces of Afghanistan by CARE and the Afghan Women’s Resource Centre (AWRC). The project aimed at strengthening community-based groups in contributing and influencing local decision-making processes and monitoring service delivery and to enhance responsiveness and accountability of power-holders and local authorities in order for them to serve the needs of communities, particularly women and girls. Read More...

Livelihoods Advancement for Marginalized Populations (LAMP)

CARE International’s Livelihood Advancement for Marginalized Populations (LAMP) project aims to create job opportunities and address the constraints faced by marginalized populations – Internally Displaced People (IDP), returnees, women, and youth – in securing jobs and business opportunities.
This gender analysis and baseline survey for the LAMP project is intended to create benchmarks for its key indicators and to help LAMP prioritize its interventions. The findings of this study will be used to create the baseline values of the key outcome indicators outlined in the LAMP Activity Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Plan (AMELP) and inform appropriate interventions regarding livelihoods advancement and gender related activities.
CARE/LAMP and CBMC purposively selected the four provinces of Kabul, Khost, Ghazni and Balkh as intervention areas under LAMP. Random sampling was used to select a sub-group of intervention household groups and systematic random sampling was used to select a control group of respondents. Data collection enumerators and field supervisors were trained on the data collection tools and methodology to trail the approach with a sub-set of households prior to the survey. Focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) with secondary stakeholders provided qualitative and local context and a means to triangulate household survey findings. CBMC conducted three FGDs and three KIIs in each province, except for Kabul where KIIs were not possible due to the time constraints of government stakeholders and officials. The secondary stakeholders reached in this study were the MORR, MOWA, MAIL and MOLSAMD. Read More...

Women Income Generation Through Livelihood Development (WIGLD) Project

Women Income Generation Through Livelihood Development (WIGLD) project is a project funded by Beyond the 11th. The project is helping afghan women to improve their economy and to support themselves and their children.

The project has been operational in Afghanistan since 2003. The overall project goal is to contribute to the economic development of vulnerable women. Currently, the project is operational in two sub-districts of Kabul province. The project targets 1,000 women-headed household through the establishment of 56 Community Based Saving Groups (CBSGs). The project beneficiaries receive different support such as teaching them life skills, including basic literacy and numeracy, environmental and basic hygiene, and business development skills and provision of marketing opportunities for their products.

This report is the result of a Midterm Review (MTR) conducted to find out the level of changes made toward project objectives and highlights programmatic strengths and challenges that can inform future efforts of the project in the remaining life span of the project. The review has been conducted by CARE PQ department through with support of daily wage data enumerators who have been hired for a short period. The assessment targeted 278 beneficiaries of the project and has also conducted 10 FGDs to know the insight of the project participants. Read More...

Steps Towards Afghan Girls Educational Success II Mid Term Review

As part of the Girls Education Challenge-Transition (GEC-T) program, Steps Towards Afghan Girls’ Educational Success-II (STAGES-II) is expanding its work from GEC-1 to implement community-based education (CBE) to marginalised girls in 16 provinces of Afghanistan. STAGES-II is building on past activities and learning to introduce a new focus on transition, particularly the transition of girls from primary to secondary school education. The project aims to contribute to the learning and transition outcomes of 22,290 girls enrolled in primary- and lower-secondary community-based education (CBE) and accelerated learning programs (ALP). These beneficiaries are marginalised girls who live in remote areas un-serviced by government school education, and STAGES is targeting three sub-categories of marginalisation: girls with disabilities, girls who don’t speak the language of instruction and girls from poor households. In addition, STAGES will reach 9815 boys through community-based education, 187,390 girls and 158,942 boys in government schools and 7868 teachers in community-based and government schools. A total of 83,421 community members, and 3636 women and 5001 men participating in school management councils (SMCs) will also benefit from the project.
The overall purpose of the midline evaluation is to compare results from baseline to midline, and assess the extent to which programme outcomes have improved. The evaluation tracks longitudinal cohorts of girls across the life of the project, for learning and transition outcomes. Learning cohorts were sampled at the baseline and midline. Transition cohorts were sampled and tracked at the household level at midline, as an additional arm of enquiry. Read More...

Phase Two Endline Report – Can Communities take charge? The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan

The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education in Afghanistan (ALSE) is a multiyear, randomized controlled trial that aims to deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school access and learning through CBE, and (2) to sustain the gains achieved through CBE into the future. ALSE’s Phase One explored the effects of CBE on education access, children’s learning achievement and villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions. Phase Two focused on testing a CBE sustainability model, where village-level community institutions take charge of the CBE management jointly with local government education offices. Key findings from the Phase Two study include:1. ALSE’s cost-comparison analysis of CBE administration shows that the cost of the sustainability model of CBE is 53.7% the cost of NGO management of CBE per village. 2. Community administration of CBE under the sustainability model is as effective as under continued NGO administration in terms of promoting access to education and children’s learning, significantly outperforming what one might expect, given the cost difference mentioned above. 3. Community management under the sustainability model provides access and learning opportunities for both boys and girls; the model performs slightly more effectively for girls than for boys in increasing access to education, although this difference is not statistically significant. 4. The confidence in village community institutions among heads of households and CBE teachers did not differ from their confidence in those institutions under NGO administration. However, under the sustainability model, community leaders’ confidence in local institutions was lower than their confidence in these institutions under NGO management. Moreover, CBE teachers’ confidence that CBE classes will continue under the sustainability model was weaker than that of their peers in communities under the NGO model. The absence of mechanisms, including funds to ensure long-term access to the CBE classes, likely influenced this decline in confidence. 5. The level of villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions under the sustainability model of CBE were not significantly different than the level found in areas under continued NGO administration. Read More...

STAGES-II Baseline Report

As part of the Girls Education Challenge-Transition (GEC-T) program, Steps Towards Afghan Girls’ Educational Success-II (STAGES-II) is expanding its work from GEC-1 to implement community-based education (CBE) to marginalised girls in 16 provinces of Afghanistan. STAGES-II is building on past activities and learning to introduce a new focus on transition, particularly the transition of girls from primary to secondary school education. The project aims to contribute to the learning and transition outcomes of 22,731 girls enrolled in primary- and lower-secondary community-based education (CBE) and accelerated learning programs (ALP). These beneficiaries are marginalised girls who live in remote areas un-serviced by government school education, and STAGES is targeting three sub-categories of marginalisation: girls with disabilities, girls who don’t speak the language of instruction and girls from poor households. In addition, STAGES will reach 9815 boys through community-based education, 187,390 girls and 158,942 boys in government schools and 7868 teachers in community-based and government schools. A total of 83,421 community members, and 3636 women and 5001 men participating in school management councils (SMCs) will also benefit from the project. Read More...

Community Based Education Enrichment Program in Afghanistan

The Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) was part of a larger endeavor of the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effect in Community Based Education (ALSE) research project. A similar parallel community-based education (CBE) program was being implemented by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in the provinces of Herat, Ghor, Daykundi and Bamyan. The project goal was to enhance increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. The evaluation provides an opportunity to gain a wider understanding of the overall achievements of the project and how the key evaluation questions of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and impact have been answered.

Overall, the project objectives were achieved since there are substantial evidences of increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. This was largely attributed to the project being implemented in coordination with the local government to support the efforts of the Afghan MoE in expanding the access to education in remote areas. The project also enhanced increased number of both male and female teachers, a challenge the Afghan government had faced in the past decades. This was the result of the provision of safe, quality learning opportunities and in addition to the increased commitment of the Shuras in supporting increased access to education by afghan children, particularly girls. Moreover, the very first initiative of mapping the planning and implementation of District Mapping exercise was carried out by all nine District Education Department (DEDs) in coordination with CARE. Read More...

Humanitarian Program Baseline/KAP Survey Report- Balkh and Kabul Provinces

CARE’s Emergency Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan (EHSSAN) Project has planned to assist 4,400 households in seven provinces (Kabul, Balkh, Parwan, Kapisa, Ghazni, Paktia and Khost). The hygiene, CFW, SRH, Winterization and UCG activities are implemented in two Kabul and Balkh provinces as project plan and rest of NFI and shelter assistance are provided to all targeted provinces. A baseline study was conducted to establish baseline values for indicators of intended outcomes and collect information about the target group prior to intervention. The survey findings in Kabul and Balkh provinces shows that, 19% of families are headed by women in the targeted area and 52.8% of women involved in CDCs & household level decision making. Regarding their income main source 89% of respondents said they received income from daily wage activities to fulfil their basic need in current situation. 48% of targeted people received humanitarian assistance from different humanitarian actors in past 6 months. 98% of individual respondent declared that, their basic need is cash, 62% of individual declared that their basic need is food assistance. 34% of FGD respondent confirmed that, their basic need is cash as well, but 67 % of female respondent basic was job opportunity and vocational trainings. 67% of women have economy contribution with their family through skill and job salary. [33 pages] Read More...

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