Afghanistan

STAGES-II Baseline Report

As part of the Girls Education Challenge-Transition (GEC-T) program, Steps Towards Afghan Girls’ Educational Success-II (STAGES-II) is expanding its work from GEC-1 to implement community-based education (CBE) to marginalised girls in 16 provinces of Afghanistan. STAGES-II is building on past activities and learning to introduce a new focus on transition, particularly the transition of girls from primary to secondary school education. The project aims to contribute to the learning and transition outcomes of 22,731 girls enrolled in primary- and lower-secondary community-based education (CBE) and accelerated learning programs (ALP). These beneficiaries are marginalised girls who live in remote areas un-serviced by government school education, and STAGES is targeting three sub-categories of marginalisation: girls with disabilities, girls who don’t speak the language of instruction and girls from poor households. In addition, STAGES will reach 9815 boys through community-based education, 187,390 girls and 158,942 boys in government schools and 7868 teachers in community-based and government schools. A total of 83,421 community members, and 3636 women and 5001 men participating in school management councils (SMCs) will also benefit from the project. Read More...

Community Based Education Enrichment Program in Afghanistan

The Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) was part of a larger endeavor of the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effect in Community Based Education (ALSE) research project. A similar parallel community-based education (CBE) program was being implemented by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in the provinces of Herat, Ghor, Daykundi and Bamyan. The project goal was to enhance increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. The evaluation provides an opportunity to gain a wider understanding of the overall achievements of the project and how the key evaluation questions of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and impact have been answered.

Overall, the project objectives were achieved since there are substantial evidences of increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. This was largely attributed to the project being implemented in coordination with the local government to support the efforts of the Afghan MoE in expanding the access to education in remote areas. The project also enhanced increased number of both male and female teachers, a challenge the Afghan government had faced in the past decades. This was the result of the provision of safe, quality learning opportunities and in addition to the increased commitment of the Shuras in supporting increased access to education by afghan children, particularly girls. Moreover, the very first initiative of mapping the planning and implementation of District Mapping exercise was carried out by all nine District Education Department (DEDs) in coordination with CARE. Read More...

Humanitarian Program Baseline/KAP Survey Report- Balkh and Kabul Provinces

CARE’s Emergency Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan (EHSSAN) Project has planned to assist 4,400 households in seven provinces (Kabul, Balkh, Parwan, Kapisa, Ghazni, Paktia and Khost). The hygiene, CFW, SRH, Winterization and UCG activities are implemented in two Kabul and Balkh provinces as project plan and rest of NFI and shelter assistance are provided to all targeted provinces. A baseline study was conducted to establish baseline values for indicators of intended outcomes and collect information about the target group prior to intervention. The survey findings in Kabul and Balkh provinces shows that, 19% of families are headed by women in the targeted area and 52.8% of women involved in CDCs & household level decision making. Regarding their income main source 89% of respondents said they received income from daily wage activities to fulfil their basic need in current situation. 48% of targeted people received humanitarian assistance from different humanitarian actors in past 6 months. 98% of individual respondent declared that, their basic need is cash, 62% of individual declared that their basic need is food assistance. 34% of FGD respondent confirmed that, their basic need is cash as well, but 67 % of female respondent basic was job opportunity and vocational trainings. 67% of women have economy contribution with their family through skill and job salary. [33 pages] Read More...

Second National Advocacy Conference Position Paper EVC Project

CARE and its partners WCLRF, AWRC and HRRAC are jointly implementing the Every Voice Count-EVC program in targeted provinces, by advocating for women’s and girls’ rights as well as their visible positions in decision making process that would enable a supportive environment for their access to education and health services and participation in local decision making. This is, to some extent, achieved via the implementation of the Community Score Card, Social Audit, and advocacy efforts to promote inclusive governance while incorporating lessons learnt and constructive ideas into policies, priorities and programs of the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Public Health, Independent Directorate of Local Governance and Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation & Development and Ministry of Hajj & Religious Affairs. Therefore, through this paper, on behalf of women and girls from the communities that EVC is being implemented, we as representatives of communities call on local and national authorities to address the needs and fulfill the rights of women and girls at community level. [4 pages] Read More...

Final evaluation of Maternal New Born and Child Health in district two of Kabul City, Afghanistan.

CARE International in Afghanistan has been implementing community based MNCH project in district 1. Recently, CARE started to expand its program to district 2 of Kabul city. The final evaluation intends to generate information that will be used to compare the contribution of Opportunity for Mothers and Infants Development (OMID) project against baseline. A Cross-sectional descriptive study design has been used to provide information on the change in key knowledge, attitude and practice variables related to maternal, newborn and child health. The objectives of the final evaluation: 1) To assess progress towards meeting the three project outcomes. 2) To compare the contribution of OMID project against baseline findings and recommendations 3) To ascertain the degree of achievement and progress toward project output, outcome and overall objective as set in project proposal and logical framework living children. 4) To assess if the project has potential to be scaled-up, replicated and/or adjusted to improve program quality under any potential extension phases based on experience to date. Read More...

Phase One Outcomes Report The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects on Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan

This report presents the Phase One outcomes for the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects (ALSE) project in Afghanistan, an initiative funded by USAID through a grant issued to the Steinhardt School at New York University (NYU). The research is being carried out in close cooperation with the implementing partners, CRS and CARE International. ALSE is a comprehensive multi-year impact evaluation that aims to expand and deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school learning and access through community-based education (CBE), and (2) to sustain these gains in learning and access into the future. Phase One focuses on questions related to the first theme, studying the impact of CBE models that vary in teacher recruitment criteria and the extent of parent and community-level mobilization to support children’s education. The outcomes presented in this report harness ALSE’s experimental design (RCT) to evaluate CBE effectiveness, teacher recruitment, and parent/community mobilization. We compare outcomes in villages where our NGO partners, CARE and CRS, established classes in 2014 to villages where the NGOs had not yet established classes. We also compare different variations in teacher recruitment and community engagement among villages that received classes in 2014. The ALSE study is conducted in six Afghan provinces: Bamiyan, Daykundi, Ghor, Herat, Kapisa and Parwan. [55 pages] Read More...

The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan Baseline report

This report presents the findings of baseline data collection for the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects (ALSE) project in Afghanistan, an initiative funded by USAID through grants to the University of New York (NYU). ALSE is a comprehensive multi-year impact evaluation that aims to expand and deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school learning and access through community-based education (CBE), and (2) to sustain these gains in learning and access into the future. The program operates as a randomized control trial using mixed quantitative and qualitative outcome assessments and measurements. ALSE assesses a CBE program implemented by CARE and CRS (funded by Canada) in 180 villages in the six central Afghan provinces of Bamiyan, Daykundi, Ghor, Herat, Kapisa, and Parwan. In this baseline data report we describe the geographic, demographic, and educational context of the communities we are studying. We also characterize some key patterns in access to education, demand for education, and children’s verbal and mathematical aptitude. The data collection for this report, which was undertaken in the summer and fall of 2014, will help set the stage for future data collection. [150 pages] Read More...

Phase Two Baseline Report The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan

This report presents the findings of baseline data collection for the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects (ALSE) project in Afghanistan, an initiative funded by USAID through grants to the University of New York (NYU). ALSE is a comprehensive multi-year impact evaluation that aims to expand and deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school learning and access through community-based education (CBE), and (2) to sustain these gains in learning and access into the future. The program operates as a randomized control trial using mixed quantitative and qualitative outcome assessments and measurements. ALSE assesses a CBE program implemented by CARE and CRS (funded by Canada) in 180 villages in the six central Afghan provinces of Bamiyan, Daykundi, Ghor, Herat, Kapisa, and Parwan. Phase Two of the ALSE project tests a model of CBE sustainability under the management of three community-level institutions—Community Development Councils (CDCs), Education Subcommittees (ESs), and School Management Shuras (SMSs). Two of the research consists of four steps: (1) a baseline “institutional-capacity assessment” of the three institutions; (2) capacity-building training for the three institutions; (3) the “handover” of 69 randomly assigned CBE classes from management under an NGO to management by the three institutions; and (4) a comparison of education access and learning outcomes between villages where CBE classes were managed by community institutions and those that continued under NGO management for one academic year. This Phase Two Baseline Report focuses on steps (1) and (2) above. The institutional capacity assessment was conducted in late 2016 in 184 villages across six provinces in Afghanistan. The results presented in this report shed light on the current functionality and management practices of the institutions prior to their involvement in the management of CBE classes in their respective villages. [47 pages] Read More...

Every Voice Counts (EVC) Program Mid Term Review Report

This report presents a Mid-Term Review of the Every Voice Counts (EVC) Program and presents the key evaluation questions of relevancy, efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability. In the methodology, a triangulation of data is presented with emphasis on comprehensive desk review of key internal and external documents relevant to the project, theory of change and Harvesting of Outcomes (OH), structured questionnaires, key informant interviews and focus group discussions with a representative sample. Statistical data is presented in form of charts, frequency tables and logical framework. The evaluation report provides clear, evidence-based and analytical answers to all the agreed evaluation questions and includes the assessment of the cross-cutting topics. It contains all the necessary raw data information that have been used in the process of data collection and analysis, and any other necessary annexes and references used. Stories of change have been highlighted to support the stated quantitative data. Data have been disaggregated by provinces, gender and type of organization of the respondents. The aim of this assignment is to conduct the external Midterm Review (MTR) of the Every Voice Counts Program as described in this ToR, following the four (04) domains, that is, empowerment of members of excluded groups in particular, women and girls on lobby and advocacy, strengthening the advocacy of CSOs, enhancing responsiveness of public authorities and other power holders and strengthening space for dialogue and negotiations. These are reflected under the key evaluation questions of OECD (relevancy, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability). In the particular, the evaluation focused on the following: Describe progress in relation to the country Theory of Change (ToC) and objectives of the EVC Program and as compared to baseline; Describe what went well, what did not and what could be improved. [177 pages] Read More...

Math Knowledge Needs Assessment

The GEC places a strong emphasis on uptake of literacy and numeracy skills as a primary outcome for girls supported by projects. STAGES II is directly educating 23,000 girls in CBE classes and supporting a further 170,000 girls through government school interventions. These beneficiaries are expected to meet the target of 0.25 standard deviations over the control group (non-STAGES supported government school students) in both literacy and numeracy testing at midline and endline. Numeracy skill uptake is measured through Early Grade Mathematics Assessment (EGMA) and Secondary Grade Mathematics Assessment (SEGMA) tools designed by the STAGES evaluator, which are composed of a number of sub-tasks including number identification fluency (EGMA 1), quantity discrimination (EGMA 2), missing number identification (EGMA 3), addition fluency (EGMA 4), subtraction fluency (EGMA 5), word problems (EGMA 6), multiplication and division (SEGMA 1), and more complex equations including algebra (SEGMA 2). [6 pages] Read More...

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