Bangladesh

Pathways- Global Baseline Report

CARE’s Pathways program focuses on improving poor women farmers’ productivity by empowering them to more fully engage in equitable agriculture systems. The program is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and implemented in Bangladesh, Ghana, India, Malawi, Mali, and Tanzania. Aligned with other CARE initiatives, such as CARE Australia’s WE-RISE program, Pathways is designed to overcome the constraints to women’s productive and equitable engagement in agriculture. Utilizing a strong gender focus, the program’s Theory of Change posits that marginalized, poor women farmers will be more productive, and their families more food secure when:
 women have increased capacity (skills, knowledge, resources), capabilities (confidence, bargaining power, collective voice), and support
 local governance and institutions have/implement gender-sensitive policies and programming that are responsive to the rights and needs of poor women farmers
 agricultural service, value chain, and market environments of relevance to women are more competitive, gender-inclusive, and environmentally sustainable. [104 pages] Read More...

SHOUHARDO III Midterm Methodology report

This Volume II of the report for the Mid-Term Evaluation (MTE) of the SHOUHARDO III Program implemented by CARE and local partners in Bangladesh summarizes the methodology that was used to conduct the MTE over the period from late October 2017 through mid-June 2018. This resource document is being provided as a separate document from the MTE Summary Report (Volume I) [also available on this site] which summarizes the priority recommendations that emerged from the MTE Process. (148 pages) Read More...

SHOUHARDO III Mid Term Summary

recommendations for the remaining life of the program to increase effectiveness in achieving sustainable impact and increase efficiency in use of resources. The MTE was planned and implemented over the period from late October 2017, through mid-June, 2018, with information gathering and preliminary analysis undertaken in Bangladesh from February 12 through March 12. The SHOUHARDO III Program is being implemented in 947 villages in 115 unions in 23 upazilas in 8 districts1 in northern Bangladesh. The goal of the program is to achieve improved gender equitable food and nutrition security and resilience for vulnerable people living in the flood-prone Char and Haor Regions of Bangladesh by 2020. The program is specifically targeting people defined by their communities as poor or extreme poor (PEP), expecting to have lasting impact by the end of its life on around 675,000 persons. The overall program value is USD 80 million3 from the United States Government with a complementary funding of USD 7,707,490 million from the Government of Bangladesh (GoB). A total of 126,810 Metric Tons (MTs) of commodities are planned for monetization over the life of the program, and 11,540 MT of commodities are planned for distribution under the maternal and child health and nutrition component (Purpose 2) of the program. (82 pages) Read More...

Relief Support for Flood and Cyclone Affected Population in Need in South-East Bangladesh (RESPONSE) Project

Heavy rainfall befell Bangladesh in the last week of June 2015, causing landslides and flash flooding. 29 Upazilas (sub-districts) of the South-Eastern districts of Cox’s Bazar, Bandarban and Chittagong were the worst affected areas as identified by the Department of Disaster Management (DDM) - a Joint Needs Assessment revealed that a total of over 1.8 million people were adversely impacted.

Incessant rainfalls in turn resulted in a depression in the North Bay of Bengal and transformed in to a Cyclonic Storm ‘Komen’ on 30 July 2015, affecting 15 districts situated in the low-lying areas of the coastal belt, offshore islands, and chars. ‘Komen’ led to further heavy to very heavy rainfall across the entire country, and caused inundation in many areas of Southeast Bangladesh, including those which were affected by the initial phase of heavy rainfall. Consequently the lives and livelihoods of a large cross section of people from these areas were severely impacted – JNA and a post-cyclone rapid impact assessment conducted in the most affected districts revealed that the total number of people affected by flash floods and ‘Komen’ stood at 2.6 million in Southern Bangladesh!

The assessments identified Food Security/Supply, Livelihoods, WASH, and Shelter as the immediate needs of the affected people. Humanitarian actors came together to incorporate these needs in to a Joint Response Plan (JRP) aimed at addressing the immediate and emerging adversities facing the most vulnerable and affected communities. The response plan was also endorsed by the key stakeholders including government and donor organizations.

Based on the JRP the National Alliance for Risk Reduction and Response Initiatives (NARRI) consortium undertook a response project in the most affected areas. NARRI responded to the immediate needs of affected communities by providing unconditional cash grants as assistance. CARE Bangladesh led the consortium with Oxfam, Concern Worldwide (CWW), Concern Universal (CU) and Plan International as consortium members, while Handicap International served as technical partner. [4 pages] Read More...

Journey for the Advancement of Transparency, Representation, and Accountability (JATRA)

This 39 page report highlights the final evaluation findings from the Journey for Advancement for Transparency, Representation and Accountability (JATRA) project, which aimed to strengthen participatory governance processes in the public finance management systems of 15 Union Parishads in Nilphamari and Gaibandha districts of Northwest Bangladesh so that they are more transparent and accountable. This project was funded through the Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA), established by the World Bank. Read More...

Community Support System (CmSS) Evaluation Report

Reduction of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality is a priority area in the Health Nutrition and Population Section Program (HNSP) of the Government of Bangladesh. To address huge unmet needs for maternal and neonatal health (MNH) services, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) with support from JICA launched the Safe Motherhood Promotion Project (SMPP) in Narsingdi district in 2006. The purposed of the SMPP project is to improve health status of pregnant and postpartum women and neonates in the project area. [78 pages] Read More...

An impact evaluation of the Safe Motherhood Promotion Project in Bangladesh: Evidence from Japanese aid-funded technical cooperation

This paper reports the findings from a quasi-experimental impact evaluation of the Safe Motherhood Promotion Project (SMPP) conducted in the Narsingdi district of Bangladesh. SMPP is a Japanese aid- funded technical cooperation project aimed at developing local capacities to tackle maternal and new- born health problems in rural areas. We assessed whether the project interventions, in particular, community-based activities under the Model Union approach, had a favorable impact on women’s access to and knowledge of maternal health care during pregnancy and childbirth. The project comprises a package of interlinked interventions to facilitate safe motherhood practices at primary and secondary care levels. [8 pages] Read More...

The Effect of Addressing Demand for as well as Supply of Emergency Obstetric Care in Dinajpur, Bangladesh

The Dinajpur SafeMother initiative (DSI) was designed to test the impact of several interventions on use of obstetric services in government health facilities in Northwester Bangladesh during 1998-2001. Intervention: Facility-based interventions included upgrading health facilities. The sub-district hospitals or Upazila Health Centers (UHCs) had earlier been upgraded to provide basic emergency obstetric care. The project undertook activities designed to improve the quality of care in the facilities which included team-building among providers, case reviews, and a stakeholders' committee. [10 pages] Read More...

Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) Pilot Phase Impact Report

CARE Bangladesh has designed a project titled “Where the Rain Falls (WtRF)”, based on a research, which has been implemented in two sub-districts of Kurigram district in the northwestern Bangladesh with financial support from Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation. This study provides an account of the effectiveness of a few measures considered under the project, in order to meet the above-mentioned needs of the smallholder farmers of the two target sub-districts. [63 pages] Read More...

A-Card Progress and Prospects

A-card (A stands for Agriculture) is a brand new micro-credit mechanism, the only example in Bangladesh aimed at providing smallholder farmers financing to a digital purchase of farm inputs at a low cost (10%) through the formal financial system linked to a debit card and ICT-enabled platforms.

Addressing the problem of smallholder farmers' lack of access to finance required a consultation among different stakeholders particularly in finding an effective solution. It eventually led to the idea and design of the A-card model. In this regard, the USAID Agricultural Extension Support Activity (AESA) project's interventions effectively engaged with different stakeholders, including small-holder farmers, microfinance institutions (MFIs), formal lenders (i.e. banks) and rural agricultural inputs retailers. The aim of this collaboration was to work for a common goal with differentiated responsibilities. [14 pages] Read More...

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