Bangladesh

AESA Performance of Mungbean in the South-Central Region of Bangladesh

Bangladesh has been experiencing a shortage of land for pulses, whereas its demand is increasing day by day. This, increasing yield remains to be the option for elevating pulse production in the country. In this regard, mungbean can play an important role especially in the South-Central Region of Bangladesh.

This study was undertaken for scoping increased yield and profitability of the crop in the region. Field experiments were conducted using three genotypes, four locations environments, two seasonal environments, and two managements. Read More...

Outcome Harvesting evaluation OIKKO (Unity): Bangladesh

OIKKO (Unity in Bangla) was a 3 year project (March 2015 – February 2018) delivered by CARE Bangladesh with support from CARE Austria, with funding from the European Union and the Austrian Development Agency. The overall objective of the project was: a strong and united civil society promotes the implementation of fundamental labour rights in the ready-made garment (RMG) sector in Bangladesh.
OIKKO was implemented through the following actors: CARE Bangladesh and 3 partners Sheva Nari O Shishu Kallyan Kendra (SHEVA, Gazipur), Agrajattra (AJ, Chittagong), and Karmojibi Nari (KN).
The main interventions of the project were:
• Forming solidarity groups of women RMG workers known as EKATA (Empowering Through Knowledge and Transformative Action).
• EKATA members with a high leadership potential were selected to form larger Community Worker Associations (CWA) to facilitate engagement and participation in trade unions and federation.
• Form Community Support Groups to help foster a supportive environment for the project.
• A national platform to engage civil society.
• Gender sensitisation training for trade union and federation leaders.
• Publications including commissioned research on, for instance, minimum wage.
• A national convention to take stock of OIKKO and share achievements. Read More...

Measuring Social Norms and Girls’ Empowerment Report of the SenseMaker study of the

This report presents the findings from a SenseMaker story collection process conducted as part of a qualitative evaluation of CARE International’s Tipping Point project in Sunamganj, Bangladesh. Tipping Point aims to reduce the incidence of child marriage through shifting social norms at the community level, addressing the root causes of the practice and seeking to holistically effect change at the level of individuals, communities, and the broader enabling environment. The SenseMaker study was conducted by the Overseas Development Institute and researchers from Jahangirnagar University, in close cooperation with Tipping Point’s two local implementing
partners, JASHIS and ASD in Sunamganj district. The evaluation team collected 875 stories in total: 325 from girls; 214 from boys; and 336 from mothers and fathers of adolescents.

The primary analytical approach for assessing the nature of change within Tipping Point communities was comparing the data from Boundary Partners (girls and boys who participate in Tipping Point ‘Fun Centre’ groups, and parents of adolescents who participate in Fun Centre groups) with data from non-Boundary Partners from the same village. Read More...

Desk review to conduct assessment of ‘value for money’ provided through CARE International’s programmes to vulnerable and marginalised populations in Asia

This case study has been prepared as part of a study commissioned by CARE International (CI) to assess its long-term impact achieved in the Asia Pacific region between 2005 and 2010. As part of this process CI explored the extent to which socio-economic cost benefit analysis could be applied on a sample of CI projects, using an adapted form of the Social Return on Investment (SROI) methodology1.
The aim of the study was to gain a better understanding of CI’s ability to deliver added benefit and value to participating communities and their societies, given invested resources, whilst testing the feasibility of applying an adapted form of SROI to projects. The study is also expected to contribute to a wider discussion on the usefulness, and applicability, of demonstrating value for money within the contexts CI works.
Given CI’s focus on empowerment, and especially of marginalised and vulnerable women, this case study presents the analysis and findings of four projects: Plantation Community Empowerment Project (PCEP), Sri Lanka Social & Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU), Bangladesh Integrated Rural Development and Disaster Mitigation (IRDM), Cambodia Poverty Alleviation in Remote Upland Areas (PARUA), Laos
It is important to note that the projects selected for analysis were initiatives within wider programmes and, as such, were not intended to be illustrative of the overall programme’s magnitude or effectiveness. The SROI methodology is a good fit for CI’s projects due to its participatory nature and valuation of things that matter to stakeholders. However, due to the desk-based nature of this study, these findings should be seen as purely indicative as field research would be required to build a definitive and an accurate picture of impact. Read More...

Tipping Point Outcome Mapping Phase 1

CARE’S TIPPING POINT PROJECT addresses child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in Nepal and Bangladesh, two countries with high rates of child, early, and forced marriage (CEFM). The project focuses on identifying the root causes of child marriage and facilitates innovative strategies to create alternative paths for adolescent girls. The project conducted a Community Participatory Analysis (CPA) Study1 designed to deepen understanding of the contextual factors and root causes driving the prevalence of child marriage in distinctive regions within Nepal (two districts of the Terai; 16 municipal areas) and Bangladesh (one district in wetland areas; 90 villages) in the highly marginalized communities in which Tipping Point programming would take place. The CPA informed innovative and context-specific program design for local level strategies, including who to target, and contributed to the
development of approaches for monitoring and evaluation. As a learning and innovation initiative, the project is expected to contribute to the global understanding of the complex issues driving child marriage and different strategies that can contribute to a “tipping point” of sustainable change to prevent child marriage and create viable alternative paths for adolescent girls. Read More...

Improving Effective Coverage of Maternal, New-born and Child Health Interventions for Reducing Preventable Child Deaths in Tangail and Khulna

Bangladesh has achieved success in reducing U5 & maternal mortality in last decade. UNICEF is partnering with GoB to contribute to reduce maternal and newborn deaths. To this end, MoH&FW with partnering with UNICEF and technical support from KOIKA implemented a MNCH project (IECMNCH) in Tangail and Khulna in line with UNICEF’s efforts to pay attention to low performing upazilas and HTR areas, started in 2015. CARE is one of the partners on this project.
designed to address main causes of newborn deaths (birth asphyxia, infection, prematurity)
to increase availability, utilization of quality MNCH-&-Nutrition services by
- increasing, sustaining of effective coverage of selected interventions;
- strengthening health system with increased availability & access to quality MNCH services;
-positive behaviour & social norm change through community participation & ownership for effective demand creation for increased utilization of MNCH services.

A baseline study in 2015 and an endline evaluation study in 2018 were implemented by UNICEF. Here are the endline study findings with corresponding baseline findings where necessary.
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Improving Sexual, Reproductive Health and Rights Including Maternal and Newborn Health in Bangladesh

UNICEF in collaboration with Bangladesh government launched a project “Improving Sexual, Reproductive Health and Rights including Maternal and Newborn Health in Bangladesh” to improve integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights including maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health in 5 districts. CARE was a key implementing partner in this project.

Before implementation of the project a baseline study in 5 project districts (Patuakhali, Rangamati, Sirajganj, Jamalpur and Moulvibazar) with 4 comparison districts (Barguna, Khagrachhari, Lalmonirhat and Sylhet), implemented by UNICEF and conducted by SURCH between 9th May and 18th August 2018
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Tipping Point Bangladesh Final Evaluation

Phase 1 of CARE’s Tipping Point project addressed child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in 90 communities of Sunamganj, Bangladesh, in partnership with Action for Social Development (ASD) and Jaintia Shinnomul Songstha (JASHIS). In this first phase, the project promoted girls’ rights and choices around marriage through focused engagement with collectives of girls, boys, and parents, who received skills trainings and conducted advocacy events to promote gender-equitable social norms. The project also engaged allies and potential champions for girls’ rights, including government and civil society, to help drive social change and direct more resources towards girls’ empowerment in project communities.
At the conclusion of Phase 1, an external evaluation team visited a sample of project sites to conduct data collection with girls, boys, parents, and community members. Based on the evaluators’ findings, Tipping Point’s iterative and adaptive strategies have proven to be effective in supporting social norms that promote gender equity. Read More...

Krishi Utsho Endline Evaluation

Krishi Utsho is a self-sustaining market based model that operates through a multi-stakeholder participatory approach, wherein stakeholders such as private sector, government bodies and extensions, local community level shop owners (enlisted as franchisees), and rural farmers all come together to form a network of interconnected business and market interactions and relationships that benefit all. Through its unique business model, KU provides support to rural smallholder farmers (especially women) in accessing quality agro-inputs, market information, and technical assistance to strengthen and realize their agricultural
potential and help to sustain livelihoods as well as ensure food security.
This impact assessment has been undertaken to identify Krishi Utsho’s impact (economic and social) on beneficiary groups, and to assess performance in terms of intended objectives and outcomes. To capture the information required, mixed methodology was used – quantitative survey was administered to 400 KU farmers, while 9 FGDs (with farmers), 9IDIs (4 KU franchisee shop owners, 2 private suppliers, financial institution representatives, and 1 Upazila Agriculture Officer (UAO) were conducted to supplement the
qualitative information to support the quantitative data.
Under the umbrella of KU, the project has successfully developed a network of 251 agro-input shops (franchisees), 25 private sector suppliers with quality agro-inputs, strategic partnerships with government extension agents and financial institutions. Through this extensive and interconnected network, the project is able to serve the agro-input, technical support and information needs of over 51,788 smallholding rural farmers, out of which (27% are women). Apart from this, KU has ensured employment, income and different social securities of project beneficiaries. To ensure that vulnerable women are also benefited through the KU project, it undertook EWYSEA - an initiative under the broad KU umbrella, to facilitate and engage women and youth in income generating activities especially in agro-business. To advance in agriculture and increase outputs, it is important to have access to finance – something that the vulnerable farmers often lack. As such, to address this issue, KU started another initiative, namely MEDA that promotes and facilitates access to non-traditional financing for rural farmers in the KU geographical areas. Read More...

Secure Farming for Rural Smallholder Farmers An Initiative on Non-traditional Financing Services

Krishi Utsho is a successfully proven supply chain model which has improved the food security situation of vulnerable farmers and their families. As part of the KU initiative, the idea of MEDA (Non-traditional financing initiative) project is to mitigate the financial predicaments of vulnerable farmers, through introducing financial institutions to provide benefits to the farmers and bring banks and financial services closer to them. The plan is to create a linkage with bank and insurance company to secure financial offers
by becoming a guarantor where farmers’ loan will be secured by the insurance services. The project is being piloted in Bogura and Jashore. As the starting point, a baseline study has been commissioned to assess the current situation and circumstances of the target beneficiaries. This report is a reflection of the findings of the baseline survey.

To capture the information to fulfill the objectives of the study, mixed methodology was used – wherein 100 KU beneficiaries (randomly selected) participated in the quantitative survey, while six FGDs (target beneficiaries), two IDIs (KU franchisee shop owners) and two KIIs (representatives from insurance company and commercial bank) were conducted to supplement the qualitative information to support the quantitative data.
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