Egypt

Gender Sensitive Citizen Charter Project: Baseline Study and Gender Gap Analysis

The Citizen Charter approach adopted by the project “Gender Sensitive Citizen Charters” follows the approach that citizens and civil society also have important roles to play in improving and delivering public services and achieving social outcomes... Too often citizens do not know what their basic entitlements and responsibilities are, or what performance they can expect of service providers. This lack of information prevents people accessing services, allows for underperformance of services and makes it easier for local officials and service providers to divert public resources for illicit gain. Many countries have established Service Charters, backed by information campaigns which make clear what services and benefits people are entitled to receive, the performance standards they should expect, and the grievance redress channels they can use when things go wrong. The project “Gender Sensitive Citizen Charters” adopts a gender approach for the citizen’s charter in order to respond to many challenges faced at the community levels in Egypt. One of these main challenges is the poverty level. The Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) reports that Egypt’s poverty line has soared to a whopping 27.8 percent in 2015, compared to 25.2 percent back in 2011.Poverty is usually linked to distribution of resources but also to “who” can access them and “how”. Therefore, implementing a gender approach is essential as it helps in analyzing the power structures and the proper interventions to change them. This study aims at introducing a baseline study and a gender gap analysis. It depended on qualitative data collection through focus group discussions (FGDs) with women and men in both governorates where the project is implemented: Beni-Suef and Qena. It also collected data through key informant interviews with head of NGOs or CDAs in the villages and districts where the FGDs were conducted. [48 pages] Read More...

Mainstreaming of Social Accountability in The Emergency Labor Intensive Investment Project: Evaluation Study

Social accountability is one of the forms of accountability resulting from the activities of citizens and civil society organizations (CSOs) to hold government agencies accountable. The World Bank was the first to use the term “social accountability” (SA) to describe a set of procedures and mechanisms that enable citizens, civil society, and mass media to hold the government and public sector officials accountable. The term also represents the procedures adopted by the government, CSOs, mass media, and other social stakeholders to promote or facilitate such efforts. Therefore, SA is a form of social participation that transforms communities from being service receivers to a key partner throughout all stages, including needs assessment, pre-planning of activities, monitoring of service delivery, up to evaluation and improvement.

Social accountability aims at enabling stakeholders to access the best services. As such, it relies on mechanisms for giving voice and participation. Over the past decade there were many examples that revealed that citizens could express their viewpoints and actively participate in urging the public sector to be more responsive and accountable.
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Soybean Cultivation Practices Cargill PROSPER

Despite initiatives undertaken by some national and international organizations towards creating an enabling environment for soybean smallholders, most of such initiatives have been deficient in evaluating proper and improper current farming practices, which could have contributed to further reforming of this cultivation. Therefore, CARE International adopted the idea of preparing a study to measure and evaluate practices of soybean cultivation in the governorates of Minya, Beni Suef and Dakahliya. By using criteria and indicators of the reality and specificity of the soybean sector in Egypt, helping monitor and measure the form and degree of practices in order to identify problems, in such practices, suffered by smallholders and to find solutions that best suit them. [53 pages] Read More...

Mid-term Evaluation for GAC-Funded Education Projects

Mid-term Evaluation of three GAC-funded Education projects implemented by Save the Children Canada, CARE Canada, and Plan Canada in Egypt. CARE Canada-managed project was titled: Improving Syrian and Egyptian Children’s Access to Formal and Informal Education (ACCESS). Read More...

ACCESS Baseline Final Report – Improving Syrian and Egyptian Children’s Access to Formal and Informal Education

Report on the Baseline Assessment carried out for the CARE Egypt ACCESS project (Improving Syrian and Egyptian Children’s Access to Formal and Informal Education). [39 pages] Read More...

Empowering Women to Claim Inheritance Rights WIN Project

Women’s lack of access to and control over property and women’s inheritance rights are global issues. Women’s lack of control over land and property places them at a significant disadvantage in terms of securing a place to live, maintaining a means for survival and accessing economic opportunities. Inheritance law is one of the few areas of law that is largely derived from the Quran. As such, it’s been subject to minimal contestation by legal reformers. Egypt complex inheritance rules are mainly expounded in Law no.77 of 19431. The Constitution of 1971 protects women’s rights to own property and inheritance and this is detailed in the Civil Code which govern property ownership and which affirms the right to own. However, the reasons why women do not inherit are complicated. Inheritance is a fundamental issue with regard to how wealth is transferred within a society, and it directly relates to the protection of a woman’s housing and land. In other words, it is not only an issue of establishing the necessary legal frameworks that allow women to own and inherit property, although this element is certainly crucial. Gender-biased policies, customary law, traditions, social norms and attitudes that women cannot and should not own housing, land and property independently from a man, all serve to prevent women from realizing their rights to inherit. With the overall objective of achieving gender equality, CARE is launching in Assiut and Sohag governorates, Upper Egypt “Empowering Women to Claim Inheritance
Rights” (WIN), a three years project co-funded with the European Union and the Austrian Development Cooperation. Goal of the project is to provide local women with greater access to and control over economic rights, resources and opportunities. The proposed action to contribute to this long term goal is the involvement and the empowerment of actors at community and governorate levels to work coherently through an integrated approach to facilitate women's access to inheritance rights and to enable them to better manage their property and assets in Assiut and Sohag Governorates. The current study conducted by Beit Al Karma Consulting is intended to provide the baseline information to contribute to WIN project’s implementation, determine the awareness messages to be sent out and set the ground to measure project future impact and outcomes. [35 pages] Read More...

Improving Syrian and Egyptian Children’s Access to Formal and Informal Education

The project was part of the inclusive response of Canada to the regional impact of the Syrian crisis. The three-years project aimed at improving the lives of vulnerable Egyptian and Syrian children in Greater Cairo by fulfilling their urgent needs to education and child protection, enhancing social coherence in refugees hosting communities. Certainly, children are the most vulnerable category in refugees and hosting communities. Meanwhile, the Ministry of Education (MoE) exerts all possible efforts to fulfill all requests. [36 pages] Read More...

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROJECT: Documentation Report

The Youth Employment Project (YEP) is a project funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). The project started in September 2014 with a 3-year plan aiming at providing job creation and income increase opportunities to the youth in Aswan, in the agricultural sector. Aswan, in particular, has suffered economically since 2011, with a continuation of slowdown in tourism. While the majority of employment percentage in Aswan comes from agriculture, the economy as a whole is largely tourism based. The agricultural sector is an economic opportunity in Aswan, with potential of employment and increased income to the rural communities, and the economy at large. The project is designed to serve the agricultural sector in Aswan, which is heavily based on smallholder agriculture. Young people from the rural areas of Aswan have no option other than to work in the agricultural sector or to commute or migrate to the capital or to other urban centers across Upper Egypt in search of employment and better prospects. With this opportunity in the plan, the project was designed based on two outcomes (1) Increased production or revenue and profits for farmers, fishermen, traders and processors in the horticulture, livestock, aquaculture and fisheries value chains; and (2) Enabling environment improved for the development of new and existing horticulture, livestock, aquaculture and fisheries businesses in Aswan. Seven value chains were identified to be the focus of the project: Dairy, Poultry, Sheep/Goat, Fisheries/Aquaculture, Date Palm, Tomato, and Aromatic/Medicinal Plants. Interventions in each value chain were addressed through the micro financing, zero interest loans, capacity building and technical assistance. The project worked closely with local CDAs and Coops to build their capacities and encourage these associations to work with business models that are sustainable and income generating, aiming at providing job opportunities to the youth in the agricultural sector. The project faced several challenges in kicking off the activities, while establishing the Agriculture Services & Development Foundation (ASDF), in parallel, as a main project outcome. The findings of the evaluation resulted in seizing the project and its activities, as the project had not achieve the expected targets. Nevertheless, there were lessons learnt and best practices, along the way, in the value chains, processes, and community engagement that need to be documented, as references, for future projects. This is a documentation report, developed by Outreach Egypt Consultancy for Development, to record thoroughly the project design, targets, logical framework, activities, and achievements. The report also documents each value chain and the interventions related to each, while documenting lessons learnt, challenges and best practices. [140 pages] Read More...

Report on the Focus Groups with the BPRM’s beneficiaries

In order to determine whether beneficiaries reported a change in knowledge towards SGBV, a midline assessment was conducted via focus groups. Five focus groups were held in Cairo and Alexandria during October 2016 to a total of 29 Syrian and 20 Sudanese women, 8 Syrian men, and 14 Syrian children (7 girls and 7 boys). In Cairo, 15 Syrian and 20 Sudanese women were interviewed in two focus groups, and a third mixed-gender focus group was conducted with 14 children aged between 8 and 12. In Alexandria, one focus group was conducted to 14 Syrian women and another to 8 Syrian men. Interviewees were a randomly picked sample of beneficiaries who attended the project’s activities throughout the first year. Groups focused on beneficiaries’ knowledge on SGBV with specific regards to three aspects: violence within the household, violence on the streets, and violence at the workplace for adults and at school for children. [3 pages] Read More...

NEW SCHOOLS PROGRAM: a final evaluation

The New Schools Program (NSP) was a school-based reform project implemented by CARE International in collaboration with the Ministry of Education and Education directorates in the governorates of Beni Suef, Fayoum and Minia. NSP was charged with increasing school access and enrollment of girls in underserved communities in Minia, Beni Suef, and Fayoum Governorates. The focus on access and enrollment of girls was enhanced through efforts to improve the teaching and learning, mobilize the local community around the importance of education (i.e., particularly that of girls), innovative and deliberative school construction (primary, preparatory, and community multi-grade schools) processes, and adult literacy initiatives. NSP had an extensive partnership that included both Egyptian government agencies, the private sector, Egyptian NGOs and international NGOs.
The purpose of this evaluation was to examine and report on NSP’s effectiveness in addressing the following Intermediate Results: IR 1-- Access to education increased for girls in targeted areas; IR 2: Improved teaching and learning practices in USAID-supported schools; and IR 3: Increased community participation in girls’ education. [178 pages] Read More...

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