Ethiopia

Labor Market Assessment of the USAID Development Food Security Activity (DFSA): “Strengthen PSNP4 Institutions and Resilience (SPIR)”

Ethiopia is among the fastest growing non-oil economies in the world. Although Ethiopia has been advancing at an impressive rate, the gains are not being equally seen across the country. The rural populations continue to rely on traditional livelihood means and have not equally benefited from the industrialization taking place primarily in and around the capital and other large cities of the country.

For the purposes of this LMA, a comprehensive desk review, together with primary surveys in six woredas across Amhara and Oromia were conducted. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis: Research Report

Drought, worsened by the effects of El-Nino is having a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods of Ethiopians, and according to the Government and the inter-agency mid-Meher and Meher seasonal assessments, the number of people that will require food assistance in 2016 increased from 8.2 million in October 2015 to 10.2 million in December 2015, making Ethiopia home to the largest acutely food insecure population in the world. Recognising that crisis can further exacerbate existing vulnerabilities and gender norms, CARE Ethiopia sought to better understand the gender dynamics at the household and community level in order to improve the design of its interventions and build on the strengths and capacities of drought affected households. To help achieve this aim, CARE developed a bespoke participatory Rapid Gender Assessment (RGA) approach, allowing for a diverse group of staff to collect information quickly from a sample of affected communities in zones of East Hararghe, West Hararghe, South Gondar and Afar. The RGA focused on the existence and impact of any changing gender dynamics in drought affected households and communities Read More...

Adversity and Opportunity: Gender Relations, Emergencies and Resilience in the Horn of Africa

The Gender in Emergencies (GiE) study contributes to this strategy development by examining how the HES can be implemented in the specific context of the Horn of Africa (HoA).2 Commissioned in early 2014 by CARE Australia, the study’s purpose is to ‘contribute to CARE International’s Gender in Emergencies learning and research agenda providing a comparative analysis of the opportunities and challenges in gender equality and women’s empowerment in emergency contexts, and provide lessons for future humanitarian responses.’ Read More...

Integrated WASH Implementation Models for Neglected Tropical Diseases

In February 2015, CARE, supported by Johnson & Johnson, initiated the Integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Implementation Models for Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) Prevention project (I-WASH/NTDs) to investigate barriers to and success in WASH and NTD collaboration. The project was initiated to support the government of Ethiopia in its efforts to combat NTDs that are endemic to 746 woredas nationally.

As a part of this pilot, supported by Johnson & Johnson, CARE has added NTD prevention elements and activities to its longstanding water, sanitation and hygiene program in the South Gondar Zone of the Amhara region. Thus, in addition to improving WASH access and behaviors, the I-WASH/NTD program helped CARE and partners to focus deliberately on NTD prevention and work with government and other relevant stakeholders to ensure a holistic approach to NTD prevention and control. Key program elements included increased access to WASH, support for mass drug administration, increased knowledge and practice of specific prevention behaviors at the community-level and increased coordination between local government offices, community members, and health and research institutions working in WASH and NTD prevention and control. Read More...

A decade of results in Social Transformation for Pastoralist Women and Girls

CARE Ethiopia has spent the last 25 years working to better understand the lives of pastoralist communities in Ethiopia and how best to work alongside them for sustainable development. In the past decade alone, CARE Ethiopia has undertaken several analyses - studies, evaluations and assessments - that have provided valuable insight into how best to support pastoralists (women, men, girls and boys) to build a sustained quality of life. Pastoralists in Ethiopia are found in seven regions including Afar, Somali, SNNP, Oromia, Diredawa, Benshangul Gumuz and Gambella Regional States.

CARE has been at the forefront of encouraging a change in thinking in Ethiopia acknowledging that pastoralism should be regarded as a viable and economically effective livestock production system, and increasing awareness that widespread policies and practices are needed to reverse historical marginalization and address the now disproportionate levels of poverty and vulnerability faced by many pastoralist communities. Read More...

A Decade of Results in Social Transformation for Chronically Food Insecure Rural Women

CARE Ethiopia recognizes that gender-transformative approaches are ambitious, and context-specific, and that change is an incremental process instead of an endpoint, 4 but critical pause points to reflect on learning are key, and thus this document captures the critical knowledge and results CARE Ethiopia has identified over the past decade relevant to their first impact group “Chronically Food Insecure Rural Women” (CFIRW). Read More...

A Decade of Results in Social Transformation for Urban Female Youth

In Ethiopia, ensuring that both women and girls participate in and provide leadership through the urbanization process
is key and can only be accomplished by removing economic and socio- cultural barriers. Evidence from a series of
independent studies funded by USAID, the World Bank and the UNDP in 2017-2018 clearly show that urbanization and
industrialization processes in Ethiopia must be gender responsive in order to deliver sustainable outcomes.
CARE Ethiopia would challenge this and state that it must be gender transformative. For CARE Ethiopia this means
ensuring that: urban girls and women are empowered to equally access economic and social opportunities and
services; institutions become more responsive to the specific and contextual needs and priorities of urban girls and
women and with a focus to understand the heterogeneity of women and girls and their specific vulnerabilities, and that
socio-cultural norms and practices should promote gender equality. CARE Ethiopia’s Theory of Change for resource poor
urban females (see Figure 2), moves beyond individual self-improvement, towards transforming the power dynamics
and structures that served historically to reinforce gendered inequalities in urban communities. Read More...

FAMILY PLANNING FOR RESILIENCE BUILDING – RESET PLUS PROJECT

The purpose of this baseline study is to determine baseline levels and document SRH-influencing behaviors, generate understanding of the attitudes related to Sexual and Reproductive Health, Family Planning, adolescents’ and youth' views and experiences of sexuality and sexuality information and education, the range and quality of SRH services available to them in project areas; traditional practices that impact on SRH, the role of religious and traditional leaders and levels of male involvement. Read More...

SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project: Midterm Evaluation Report

This report refers to the midterm evaluation (MTE) of “SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project” funded by Austrian Development Cooperation through Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and implemented by CARE Ethiopia. The project was commenced in October 2017 and will be implemented through September 2020 in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara National Regional State. The ultimate impact was to improve the food security and resiliency of chronically food insecure households in Belesa Woredas.

The purpose of this mid-term evaluation was assessing the degree of success of the project thus far. Read More...

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