Ethiopia

A decade of results in Social Transformation for Pastoralist Women and Girls

CARE Ethiopia has spent the last 25 years working to better understand the lives of pastoralist communities in Ethiopia and how best to work alongside them for sustainable development. In the past decade alone, CARE Ethiopia has undertaken several analyses - studies, evaluations and assessments - that have provided valuable insight into how best to support pastoralists (women, men, girls and boys) to build a sustained quality of life. Pastoralists in Ethiopia are found in seven regions including Afar, Somali, SNNP, Oromia, Diredawa, Benshangul Gumuz and Gambella Regional States.

CARE has been at the forefront of encouraging a change in thinking in Ethiopia acknowledging that pastoralism should be regarded as a viable and economically effective livestock production system, and increasing awareness that widespread policies and practices are needed to reverse historical marginalization and address the now disproportionate levels of poverty and vulnerability faced by many pastoralist communities. Read More...

A Decade of Results in Social Transformation for Chronically Food Insecure Rural Women

CARE Ethiopia recognizes that gender-transformative approaches are ambitious, and context-specific, and that change is an incremental process instead of an endpoint, 4 but critical pause points to reflect on learning are key, and thus this document captures the critical knowledge and results CARE Ethiopia has identified over the past decade relevant to their first impact group “Chronically Food Insecure Rural Women” (CFIRW). Read More...

A Decade of Results in Social Transformation for Urban Female Youth

In Ethiopia, ensuring that both women and girls participate in and provide leadership through the urbanization process
is key and can only be accomplished by removing economic and socio- cultural barriers. Evidence from a series of
independent studies funded by USAID, the World Bank and the UNDP in 2017-2018 clearly show that urbanization and
industrialization processes in Ethiopia must be gender responsive in order to deliver sustainable outcomes.
CARE Ethiopia would challenge this and state that it must be gender transformative. For CARE Ethiopia this means
ensuring that: urban girls and women are empowered to equally access economic and social opportunities and
services; institutions become more responsive to the specific and contextual needs and priorities of urban girls and
women and with a focus to understand the heterogeneity of women and girls and their specific vulnerabilities, and that
socio-cultural norms and practices should promote gender equality. CARE Ethiopia’s Theory of Change for resource poor
urban females (see Figure 2), moves beyond individual self-improvement, towards transforming the power dynamics
and structures that served historically to reinforce gendered inequalities in urban communities. Read More...

FAMILY PLANNING FOR RESILIENCE BUILDING – RESET PLUS PROJECT

The purpose of this baseline study is to determine baseline levels and document SRH-influencing behaviors, generate understanding of the attitudes related to Sexual and Reproductive Health, Family Planning, adolescents’ and youth' views and experiences of sexuality and sexuality information and education, the range and quality of SRH services available to them in project areas; traditional practices that impact on SRH, the role of religious and traditional leaders and levels of male involvement. Read More...

SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project: Midterm Evaluation Report

This report refers to the midterm evaluation (MTE) of “SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project” funded by Austrian Development Cooperation through Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and implemented by CARE Ethiopia. The project was commenced in October 2017 and will be implemented through September 2020 in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara National Regional State. The ultimate impact was to improve the food security and resiliency of chronically food insecure households in Belesa Woredas.

The purpose of this mid-term evaluation was assessing the degree of success of the project thus far. Read More...

Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project: Gender In-Depth Assessment

Marginalized communities or individuals are those who are denied or excluded from services, information, education, among others, due to different socio-economic reasons. Because they are marginalized they often are not consulted, their voices are not heard and they have no influence over decisions that affect their lives. Development initiatives often target poor regions, communities or even households. But looking into the reasons why marginalized individuals may further be excluded and what needs and priorities those marginalized groups have, is not commonly exercised. This is why this analysis will focus on answering these questions in particular.

Since East and West Belesa are amongst the most food insecure woredas with critical water needs, the project decided to target poor and food insecure communities with limited to no access to clean water. The project specifically targets marginalized rural women and girls (14-17 years), unemployed youth (15-29 years) and people with disabilities. To achieve meaningful engagement of marginalized groups as well as to ensure that all people, especially women and girls, in the targeted areas are benefiting from SWEEP, CARE conducted this in depth gender assessment. Read More...

SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection in East and West Belesa Project

CARE Ethiopia, with the financial support from the Austrian Development Agency (ADA), will implement a three years’ project entitled “Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection (SWEEP)” Project in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gonder Zone, Amhara Regional State. The SWEEP project will address the socio-economic and environmental problems causing food insecurity in East and West Belesa, including poor access to water supply and environmental degradation; social barriers and gender inequality; as well as limited livelihood opportunities and low productivity. As part of the inception phase of the project, this particular baseline survey has been carried out with the ultimate aim of gathering evidence from different sources and set benchmarks and baseline values for each project outcome indicator. Read More...

Socio-Economic Status Analysis for Potential Job Creation Interventions Assessment Report

CARE Ethiopia is implementing a three-year project entitled “Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection (SWEEP)” in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gonder Zone, Amhara Regional State. The project focuses on marginalized rural women and girls, people with disabilities and unemployed youth. As one of the project activities, this “socio-economic status analysis of unemployment among youth (15-29) and other vulnerable target groups (female family heads and persons with disability) for potential job creation interventions” was conducted.
In this assessment, the sustainable livelihood analysis framework was used to understand the socio- economic context of the target group. Read More...

Mid-Term Strategic Review of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity

CARE commissioned a Mid-Term Strategic Review (MTSR) of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity to formulate recommendations for the remaining life of the project to increase effectiveness in achieving sustainable impact. The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is being implemented in 27 Woredas in the three regions of Tigray, Amhara, and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples and is just over the midway point in its five-year life from December 5, 2016, through December 3, 2021. The purpose of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is to reduce food insecurity and increase resilience for 97,900 chronically food insecure households that are enrolled in the fourth cycle of the Government of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP4), enabling them to graduate with resilience from the PSNP4.

The MTSR for the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity was a formative evaluation exercise intended to provide guidance on ways to improve the effectiveness of the program in achieving intended impact.

Relative to the four global learning questions for the MTSR (see page 4), the MTSR found that the model that the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is implementing is effective for achieving graduation with resilience, but because frontline delivery is constrained by the number of staff, their technical capacities and the degree of supervision and support that they receive, interventions are not always going deeply enough to ensure behavioral change. The program is empowering women both economically and socially through the VESA platform, but there are significant variations between regions; and outside of the VESA, there is some evidence to suggest that women’s empowerment has not yet been well incorporated, especially in value chain participation and MFI linkages. Progress is certainly being made in transferring ideas and knowledge to PSNP counterparts, but that has not yet translated into practice mainly because of resource constraints. Key approaches that need to be added or strengthened in the coming two years include expanding frontline delivery capacities, expanding efforts to ensure that strategies and approaches are well understood by implementation staff at all levels in all partners, ensuring that women’s empowerment is included in all approaches by all partners, and looking for new ways to facilitate access to jobs, either through self-employment or wage employment, for youth from PSNP households.

The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is already doing some very nice work in starting to achieve sustainable impact. The project has strong potential to be recognized as a “great” project if it can make some adjustments.
Read More...

Learning for Change (L4C): Strengthening Women’s Voices in East Africa (Ethiopia, Rwanda, Uganda)

CARE Austria, together with CARE Ethiopia, CARE Uganda and CARE Rwanda, has been implementing a three-year regional programme, “Learning for Change (L4C): Strengthening Women’s Voices in East Africa”, financed by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and CARE Austria. The programme started from 1st April 2016 to 31st March 2019. The core of this programme was organisational capacity development to support transforming gender norms.
The objective was: “268,622 women and girls are meaningfully participating in decision-making at household, community,
local and national levels”. The programme theory of change defined three expected results areas (ERs) to reach this objective:
ER 1: Improved organisational climate in partner organisations and CARE reflects transformative GED and psychosocial wellbeing.
ER 2: Programmes and knowledge systems reflect an integrated gender transformative approach in the design, implementation and reporting of CARE and partners.
ER 3: Women’s voices influence strategic forums concerning women, peace and security at national and international levels (contributing to the implementation of UN Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820). The L4C programme partners have included: CARE Austria; CARE Ethiopia with 5 government partners; CARE Uganda with 7 NGO partners; and CARE Rwanda with 6 NGO partners.
The main objective of the evaluation is to assess, measure and present the progress and success of the implementation of the L4C program (outputs and outcomes), draw out lessons learnt and provide recommendations based on these findings. The methodologies of the evaluation have included documents review; key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and self-completed most significant change (MSC) tools; reflection and review workshops; qualitative analysis; and presentation at a validation workshop. Read More...

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