Kenya

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Mid-Term Evaluation of the Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) in Mukuru and Kajiado, 2019

The Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) is a five-year (2015-2020) education project that is seeking to empower marginalized in-and out-of-school adolescent girls and boys aged 10-19 years in urban informal Nairobi (Mukuru) and rural Kajiado areas of Kenya. A baseline study was conducted in 2016 to inform implementation of the project. This midline evaluation was conducted in April 2019 to evaluate the progress of the project and inform programming mid-way through its implementation. The results will be used to guide the next steps in program implementation. The specific objectives of the midline study were to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of adolescents on ASRH, gender norms, saving and economic empowerment, financial literacy, youth leadership and decision making, education and schooling.
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Adversity and Opportunity: Gender Relations, Emergencies and Resilience in the Horn of Africa

The Gender in Emergencies (GiE) study contributes to this strategy development by examining how the HES can be implemented in the specific context of the Horn of Africa (HoA).2 Commissioned in early 2014 by CARE Australia, the study’s purpose is to ‘contribute to CARE International’s Gender in Emergencies learning and research agenda providing a comparative analysis of the opportunities and challenges in gender equality and women’s empowerment in emergency contexts, and provide lessons for future humanitarian responses.’ Read More...

The Nawiri Project: Stories and Best Practices

The Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project is a 36-month intervention on maternal and child nutrition. The project targets to reach 94,435 children under 5 years; 127,065 women of reproductive age; 42,000 adolescent girls and 20,000 men in the Siaya County. The project is executed in partnership among three consortium members; CARE (the coordinator), Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) and the Kisumu Medical and Education Trust (KMET) in Siaya County with funding support from the European Union, the Austrian Development Cooperation (ADC) and CARE.
The overall objective of the project is to contribute to improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN), including nutrition of women of reproductive age in Siaya County. In order to increase the nutritional status of children under the age of five and of women of reproductive age, the project aims to alleviate the most severe obstacles of poor MIYCN in Siaya County. Read More...

Manual for Male Involvement in Maternal and Infant Nutrition

Men’s involvement in the health of women and children is considered an important avenue for addressing gender influences on maternal and newborn health. Over the past 20 years infant and under-five mortality rates have been on the rise in Kenya, with current poor infant feeding practices contributing to more than 10,000 deaths each year.

In order to improve these practices, it is essential that mothers, caregivers, and family members have accurate information, as well as support to overcome barriers. For instance, engaging male partners in breastfeeding promotion and education, as well as providing fathers with knowledge and skills for optimal nutrition practices, including breastfeeding, has been shown to positively impact exclusive breastfeeding rates.

This training manual is highly participatory and relies on modelling activities, integration of critical assessment of activities throughout the training, called “Stepping Out,” and ultimately application and practice (Teach Backs). Read More...

Kisumu Integrated Family Health Project: Endterm Review Final Report

The Kisumu Integrated Family Health Project (KIFHP) is a three year project (November 2014 – October 2017) funded by the European Union (EU) with co-funding from the Austrian Development Cooperation (ADA) and CARE Austria. The project is implemented by CARE International in Kenya (CIK) in partnership with the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) and Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK). The project is implemented in Kisumu urban slums of Manyatta and Nyalenda and works closely with Kisumu County Government under Kisumu East Sub-County. The project aims to primarily contribute to achieving sustainable development goal 3 (SDG)and former MDGs 4 and 5 a +b-“Reduce by two thirds the under-five mortality rate”, “Reduce by three quarters the maternal mortality ratio” and “Achieve universal access to reproductive health”. The overall objective of the evaluation was to establish the results that have been achieved in the three years (November 2014‐October 2017) of implementation and the resultant impact this has had on the target beneficiaries. Read More...

Kisumu Integrated Family Health Project: Midterm Review Report

CARE International in Kenya (CIK) in partnership with the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) and Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) have been implementing a 3 year project in Kisumu urban slums of Manyatta and Nyalenda and works closely with Kisumu County Government under Kisumu East Sub-County. The overall objective of the KIFHP is to Improve Maternal and Child Health, Sexual Reproductive Health, Family Planning and nutritional status of communities living within Kisumu slums.

The specific objectives of the Midterm evaluation were: to assess the effectiveness of project interventions, assess the efficiency of approaches used in implementation of project activities, assess the project implementation progress at mid-term level and its relevance within the prevailing context of devolved health system of governance and assess project sustainability mechanism. Read More...

Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project: Midterm Evaluation

The Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project is a 36-months intervention on maternal and child nutrition. The project is executed in partnership between CARE (the coordinator), Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) and the Kisumu Medical and Education Trust (KMET) in Siaya County with funding support from the European Commission (EC), the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and CARE. The overall objective of the project is to contribute to improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN), including nutrition of women of reproductive age, in Siaya County.

The specific objectives of the mid-term evaluation of the Nawiri Project were to (1) assess the process and progress in project implementation and achievement of expected results, (2) provide an opportunity for an in-depth analysis and understanding on any unintended or intended outcomes, (3) as well as provide an opportunity for learning by project teams, partners and other stakeholders. Read More...

Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project: End of Project Evaluation

The Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project was a 36-months intervention on maternal and child nutrition. The project was executed in partnership with CARE (the coordinator), Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) and the Kisumu Medical and Education Trust (KMET) in Siaya County with funding support from the European Commission (EC), the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and CARE. The overall objective of the project was to contribute to improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN), including nutrition of women of reproductive age, in Siaya County. Read More...

Mid-Term Evaluation of the Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) in Mukuru and Kajiado, 2019

BACKGROUND
The Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) is a five-year (2015-2020) education project that is seeking to empower marginalized in-and out-of-school adolescent girls and boys aged 10-19 years in urban informal Nairobi (Mukuru) and rural Kajiado areas of Kenya. The AEP is focusing on three main areas: (i) adolescent sexual and reproductive health, (ii) economic empowerment and (iii) use of ICT to support and enhance learning.

OBJECTIVES
The specific objectives of the midline study were to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of adolescents on ASRH, gender norms, saving and economic empowerment, financial literacy, youth leadership and decision making, education and schooling.

METHODS
Quantitative and qualitative methods were used.

KEY FINDINGS
- The AEP was associated with likelihood of adolescents seeking SRH services, increased confidence to access SRH services and higher intention to use contraceptives.
- Negative gender norms and harmful traditional practices are prevalent, especially in Kajiado.
- The AEP was associated with increasing adolescents’ likelihood to save.
- At midline, there were increases in adolescents with economic empowerment.
- The AEP was associated with increasing adolescents’ financial literacy.
- The AEP was associated with greater participation in youth groups and improved youth leadership norms.
- The AEP had marginal effects on schooling outcomes such as learning and attendance.
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