Mozambique

Climate Learning and Advocacy for Resilience (CLAR) Programme

Climate Learning and Advocacy for Resilience (CLAR) was a CARE Denmark global programme that during the years 2018-2021 provided technical support to CARE country programmes. The overall objective of CLAR was “Adaptive capacity and resilience of vulnerable communities to climate change impacts, risks and uncertainties has increased.” The programme had three interrelated specific objectives, focusing on (1) demonstrating good practice, innovation and impact in climate resilience, and generating new evidence and learning, (2) improving capacity and influence among CSOs and networks on global and national policies, plans and projects on climate change adaptation and finance, and (3) strengthening of climate knowledge brokering for multi-stakeholder, cross-discipline and South-South learning and coordination.
The intention with CLAR was to link practical approaches and outcomes in climate change adaptation work with influencing policy and planning processes, in particular national adaptation plans (NAPs) and finance. CLAR was to add value to CARE country programmes through the provision of technical support for integration of climate change adaptation implementation as well as cross-country learning and knowledge sharing. CLAR targeted both local, national, and global policy spaces to promote pro-poor, equitable and effective adaptation policies, and mechanisms. Through the Southern Voices on Adaptation (SVA) advocacy community of practice, CLAR supported the sharing of experiences and best practices in different contexts on how to influence adaptation policies and adaptation finance. Read More...

SANI (Southern Africa Nutrition Initiative)

The Southern Africa Nutrition Initiative (SANI) is a $29,487,135 CAD project to address undernutrition in women of reproductive age (15-49) and children under 5 years in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia. A partnership between CARE, Cuso International, Interagency Coalition on AIDS and Development (ICAD) and McGill University and the Governments and communities of implementing countries, SANI aimed to improve the nutritional status of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) and children under-5 years old. SANI was designed to align with national health and nutrition strategic priorities of Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia, and has been implemented in close collaboration with the Ministries responsible for Health, Agriculture, and Gender in each country, as well as national and district-level nutrition coordination committees (NCC and DNCC). Between June 2016 and March 2021, SANI contributed directly to the improved health of 234,000 women, children and men directly and over 498,000 individuals indirectly.
This final report covers the implementation period of the original SANI contribution agreement and project implementation plan finalized in February 2017.
Key project achievements:
Outcome 1100 aimed to improve nutrition practices and services for women of reproductive age, boys, and girls under 5 by strengthening the delivery of community-based nutrition services at the intersection between community health and the health system. Growth Monitoring and Promotion (GMP) and Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) programs built this link, working on the continuum of prevention of malnutrition and early detection and treatment of moderate and severe acute malnutrition. Training and support on Maternal, Infant, and Young Child Nutrition (MIYCN), CMAM, and GMP was provided to health service workers and community health workers, and Care groups were established to support families to learn about and apply gender-sensitive MIYCN practices. Interactive teaching was also done at scale through participatory education theatre and cooking demonstrations using local nutritious foods. Social Analysis and Action (SAA) dialogues encouraged families involved in the program to identify, discuss, and challenge traditional social norms and practices that affect women’s health, nutrition, and empowerment.
Endline data revealed the following increases in nutrition-specific indicators from baseline:
- All three countries had considerable increases in rates of exclusive breastfeeding of children up to 5 months, increasing by 15-percentage points in Zambia (from 70% to 85%), 25- percentage points in Malawi (from 61% to 86%) and 17-percentage points in Mozambique (from 65% to 82%)
- Minimum Acceptable Diet (MAD) for children 6 to 23 months increased by 24-percentage points for boys and girls in Malawi (from 7% to 31%) and in Zambia by 7-percentage points for boys (from 24% to 31%) and by 13-percentage points for girls (from 17% to 30%)
- Knowledge of men and women on MIYCN practices improved by 6-percentage points for men (from 79% to 85%) and 4 percentage points for women in Malawi (from 90% to 94%), by 12- percentage points among women (from 59% to 71%) in Mozambique, and by 11-percentage points for women (from 81% to 92%) and 14-percentage points for men (from 72% to 86%) in Zambia. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Sofala – Beira

On the 23rd of January 2021 Tropical Cyclone Eloise made its landfall, in central Mozambique.. Over 441,686 people were affected, with 43,327 persons being displaced (the Instituto Nacional de Gestão Reduçãodo Risco de Desastres (INGD).) The storm also destroyed farmland, infrastructure and thousands of homes. Most of the areas hit by Cyclone Eloise were the same areas affected by Cyclone Idai less than two years ago and hit by tropical storm Chalane on 30 December 2020. CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis from the 12th to the 18th of February in three of the affected districts in Sofala Province, Beira (with the focus on Inhamizua, IFAPA accommodation center, and Chipangara) Nhamatanda (with focus on Tica, and Jhon Segredo Accommodation center), and Buzi (with focus on Guara-Guara), at the transit centers, resettlement sites, and catchment areas. About 56 364 houses were totally or partially destroyed, others flooded, forcing some families to shelter with host families. Others families had been evacuated from flooded areas and were staying in crowded temporary accommodation. Those that were staying in accommodation centers had lost most of their resources, and were dependent on government for daily provision. Read More...

Lessons Learnt from CARE’s Shelter Responses to Cyclone Idai in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe

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CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Cyclone Idai Response Sofala Province, Mozambique

On 14 March 2019, Tropical Cyclone Idai made landfall near Beira City, leaving devastating loss of life and large-scale destruction of assets and infrastructure. In the days that followed, entire villages were submerged as floodwaters rose causing mass displacement. From early on in the response it was clear that certain groups such as female headed-households (FHH), persons with disabilities (PwD), the elderly and children (boys and girls) were some of the most at risk, both in the immediate response and in recovery. This was further confirmed during this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA).

CARE had identified four main districts in Sofala province in which to focus its assessment based on planned operational locations: Beira, Dondo (with a focus on Samora Machel), Nhamatanda (with a focus on Mutechira) and Buzi (with a focus on Guara Guara). The RGA was built up progressively over the data collection period, using 30 focus group discussions (FGDs), 14 key informant interviews (KII), 55 household surveys, and observations, in both rural and urban areas, transit, accommodation centres and with communities. Data collection took place between the 6 and15 April 2019. Read More...

Social Outcomes of the CARE-WWF Alliance in Mozambique Results and Recommendations from a Decade of Conservation and Development Programming

In 2008, the CARE-WWF Alliance emerged as a major strategic partnership between two international non- governmental organizations seeking to tackle the linked challenge of poverty and natural resource degradation. From the start, the mission of the Alliance was to test the idea that empowering some of the poorest and most vulnerable women and communities on the planet to engage in sustainable livelihoods and natural resource governance could improve their wellbeing and conserve globally important biodiversity.

This impact report summarises the results from the full project evaluation. Read More...

Social Outcomes of the CARE-WWF Alliance in Mozambique: Research Findings from a Decade of Integrated Conservation and Development Programming

In 2008, the CARE-WWF Alliance emerged as a major strategic partnership between two international non-governmental organizations seeking to tackle the linked challenge of poverty and natural resource degradation. From the start, the mission of the Alliance was to test the idea that empowering some of the poorest and most vulnerable women and communities on the planet to engage in sustainable livelihoods and natural resource governance could improve their wellbeing and conserve globally important biodiversity.

A decade after its inception, the Alliance used existing monitoring data to support an evaluation that assessed the social impacts of the integrated conservation and development program. The design of the final evaluation was constrained by a baseline intended for project monitoring rather than impact assessment, while depth of analysis was constrained by time. Read More...

Social Outcomes of the CARE-WWF Alliance in Mozambique: Research Findings from a Decade of Integrated Conservation and Development Programming

In 2008, the CARE-WWF Alliance emerged as a major strategic partnership between two international non-governmental organizations seeking to tackle the linked challenge of poverty and natural resource degradation. From the start, the mission of the Alliance was to test the idea that empowering some of the poorest and most vulnerable women and communities on the planet to engage in sustainable livelihoods and natural resource governance could improve their wellbeing and conserve globally important biodiversity. Read More...

Rapid Gender and Protection Analysis Cyclone Kenneth Response Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique

On 25 April 2019, as Mozambique was responding to the devastation caused by Cyclone Idai five weeks previously, Tropical Cyclone Kenneth hit the northern part of the country causing widespread devastation, flooding and displacement.
In a part of Mozambique experiencing significant poverty and instability caused by complex conflict dynamics1, women, men, boys and girls in the province of Cabo Delgado had limited resilience to withstand the shock of a cyclone. Early reports indicated that certain groups were hit particularly hard, including female-headed households, pregnant and lactating women, people with disabilities, the elderly, and boys and girls. This was confirmed by the Rapid Gender and Protection Analysis (RGPA).
COSACA,2 a consortium comprised of CARE International, Oxfam and Save the Children, identified four districts of the Cabo Delgado province to focus its analysis based on ongoing and planned operations: Ibo, Quissanga, Macomia and Metuge Districts as well as Pemba Town. The RGPA was built up progressively over the data collection period through 39 focus group discussions (FGD), 34 key informant interviews (KII) and observational safety audits.
Mozambique has the thirteenth highest level of women’s participation in parliament in the world yet, at the same time, a third of women report experiencing violence, reflecting entrenched gender inequalities within society.3 These inequalities contribute to women and girls appearing to be the worst-affected by Cyclone Kenneth, subject to greater food insecurity and increased risk of gender-based violence. This is in line with global evidence on the disproportionate, gendered impact of disasters and conflict.4 Humanitarian responders must account for the different experience of crisis felt by women, men, boys and girls, and ensure actions are tailored accordingly. Moreover, those responsible for recovery programming should use the opportunity to address inequalities and transform harmful gender norms where possible. Read More...

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