Myanmar

Myanmar Endline Report Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Programme II 2016-2019

Project name: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Programme (GEWEP) II
Project period: 2016-2019
Number of people that have been directly reached: 4,429 Female and 2,305 Male
Myanmar endline / baseline report submission: 31st March 2019
Result highlights for GEWEP II in Myanmar
Sex Workers in Myanmar (SWiM) is growing. SWiM advocates for the rights of fellow sex workers by advocating for amendment of the 1949 Suppression of Prostitution Act, a law that punishes and fines prostitution, putting sex workers at increased risk. With the contribution from SWiM and other stakeholders, the Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement has been drafting a new law. The draft law is expected to be submitted to parliament by the end of 2019.
More than a hundred brothels have been lobbied to promote safer work environment for female sex workers using a minimal standard checklist. The minimal standard includes provision of condoms, and hygiene and sanitary materials for both clients and female sex workers. It also needs the brothel owners/managers to allow sex worker to go out for regular medical check-up.
58% of the endline survey respondents are members of one or more self-help groups. Participation in self-help groups develops sense of social inclusion among the sex workers. This is important, as sex workers are greatly discriminated in the general community and often excluded from the social activities in the general community.
During the survey, a subset of men – who were partner of, have work relationship with, or are somehow related to FSWs – showed aggressive attitudes towards their intimate partners. These attitudes may be linked to high incidence of violence against female sex workers. More exploration on this finding and more targeted engaging men activities are suggested for future programs. Read More...

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Program Global Results Report

GEWEP II works with poor and vulnerable women and girls in some of the world’s most fragile states: Burundi, DRC, Mali, Myanmar, Niger and Rwanda. By end 2018, the programme has reached more than 1 067 200 women and girls, mainly through Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs). Norad has supported VSLAs since they were first piloted in Niger in 1991.
Since then, Norad has supported over 47 800 groups and more than 1 100 000 women. During GEWEP II, from 2016 through 2018, more than 14 200 new groups were established. This report includes results on both outcome and output level. The table below summarises the results at outcome level, for indicators collected at the population level. Overall, there is a positive change in the perception and attitude to women’s economic, political and social empowerment in the programme intervention zones. On a national level, there has been positive changes in legislation, but implementation is still a challenge. Read More...

Women’s Empowerment Program (WEP) Midterm Report

In 2009, Norad-funded women empowerment programs (WEPs) started implementation in seven countries: Burundi, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. In 2009 and early 2010, an extensive quantitative baseline study was conducted in these countries around a common set of indicators. The present mid-term review (MTR), which was done using qualitative methodology, analysed in depth the process and nature of changes that the programs are contributing towards. In all the program countries, the country WEP team carried out the review internally with the technical assistance of an external consultant and CARE Norway (CN).

With slight variations, the overall objectives of the country WEPs focused on the economic, social, and political empowerment of women. The village savings and loan association (VSLA) methodology was common for all the programs; and these groups create the platform for working on other aspects of the program besides economic empowerment. The initial changes that the programs produce are seen in terms of increased access to savings and loans, employment opportunities, and asset ownership. The ability of the women to earn income, generate their own savings and make financial contributions in the household (HH) has greatly improved their self-esteem, thereby giving them better leverage to involve in and influence HH decision making processes. Men were highly appreciative of the income women were able to bring in to the family as a result of being involved in VSLAs. Through their improved position in the household, women reported being able to negotiate the use of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and the abandonment of different harmful practices. Through the use of couples-based approach and engaging men initiatives, HH relationships are beginning to improve; men in these households are reportedly starting to have a more positive attitude towards women’s empowerment and are themselves even taking part in domestic activities in some contexts. The VSLA approach is enabling women to create strong social networks that are becoming an influential force for social change. As a result of increased knowledge on their human rights and increasing leadership skills, women are beginning to understand how they have to position themselves to realize their strategic interests. The VSLA groups and networks also enable women to mobilise support when they are running for elections; this support has increased number of women being elected into different posts. The contribution of women in VSLAs and in community leadership positions is being increasingly recognised and appreciated by local authority figures, which can be seen when they actively seek the advice of women and VSL groups in relation to different community development initiatives.
Through working in partnership with others, the programs are being implemented in a high quality and timely manner. Engagement with strategic partners has occurred effectively in some countries, and been instrumental in enabling the programs to link grassroots evidence to national level advocacy activities which have achieved concrete results. [52 pages] Read More...

Women’s Empowerment Program (WEP) 2009-2013

CARE Norway, collaborating CARE country offices (COs), and partners have from 2009 through 2013 run the “Women Empowerment Programme” (WEP). With funding from NORAD, it has been implemented in Mali, Niger, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Myanmar and DRC (from 2013).

The results presented in this report derive from CARE’s monitoring systems, thematic assessments and research done over the 5 years. This final report is intended to give NORAD an overview of key results within the program’s four thematic focus areas: 1)Women’s Economic Empowerment, 2)Women’s Participation in Decision Making, 3) Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and 4) Prevention and Mitigation of Gender-based violence. In agreement with NORAD, the end-line evaluation of the WEP is due in May 2015. [55 pages] Read More...

Strengthening Non-State Actors for Peace (SNAP) Final Evaluation

‘Strengthening Non-State Actors for Peace in Kayah State’ (SNAP) project is a 36 months project (Jan/2016 to December/2018), implemented by CARE Myanmar in partnership with the Karenni State Women’s Network (KSWN) across Kayah State. The budget allocation for which is €575,423. Kayah State is one of the smallest by population in the Union, it is conflict-affected and lately has been the site of tension between Civil Society Organisations (CSO) and State Government representatives. Despite its size, Kayah State hosts a relatively high number of INGO and UN agency development and peace support partners working in a range of sectors. The SNAP project’s overall Goal is to enable non-state actors, with a focus on KSWN to support women’s organisations and grass roots members in representing their constituents’ interests in governmental and peace processes. The Objective of the project is to have KSWN able to ‘advocate for the needs of their constituents with decision-makers and provide community education and services through their members’. [59 pages] Read More...

Community-Driven Financial Inclusion for the Most Vulnerable Households

The Tat Lan Programme, funded by the Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) in Myanmar was implemented in two phases (2013-15 and 2017-18). The overall goal was to ensure a sustainable increase of food and nutrition security and incomes of participant households in 259 communities in the townships of Myebon, Pauktaw, Kyaukpyu and Minbya in Rakhine State. [24 pages] Read More...

Advocacy and Influencing Impact Reporting Tool Coordinated Response

This tool has been developed to gather further information and evidence on CARE’s advocacy or influencing win. At CARE, advocacy is defined as “the deliberate process of influencing those who make decisions about developing, changing and implementing policies to reduce poverty and achieve social justice.1” Influencing and advocacy can go beyond government policies, it can include influencing governments, donors or NGOs to adopt a CARE program model or influencing the private sector to change their company policies or operating practices.
This tool captures the significance of the win, the level of CARE and our partner’s contribution, who stands to benefit from the change, and what evidence do we have to support a claim of change or impact. With the wide range of successes within influencing work and the various roles CARE may have played in this win, this tool allows us to identify how significant the win is as well as the significance of CARE’s contribution and our partners. Read More...

Strengthening Non-State Actors for Peace in Kayah State: Mid-Term Review

Emerging Markets Consulting (EMC) was commissioned by Care Myanmar to carry out a midterm review (MTR) of its Strengthening Non-State Actors for Peace (SNAP) in Kayah State. CARE’s project goal is to enable non-state actors, particularly the Karenni State Women’s Network (KSWN), to support women’s organizations and grassroots members in representing their constituents’ interests in governmental and peace processes. The overall objective of the MTR is to assess the project’s progress in achieving its objectives and outcomes, in addition to facilitating a process to increase the capacity of key stakeholders in all steps of the learning cycle. More specifically, the MTR assesses the efficiency and effectiveness of the project in making progress towards achieving areas of impact, and assesses the likely achievement of expected results and specific objectives as specified within CARE’s logical framework. [23 pages] Read More...

Improving Access to Safe Employment For Migrant Women in Myanmar

CARE International in Myanmar (CIM) implemented “Improving Access to Safe Employment for Migrant Women in urban Myanmar” (hereinafter referred to as “The Project”) between July 2013 and 30 June 2017, with funding from CARE Australia (CAUST), under the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s (DFAT) Australian NGO Cooperation Agreement Partnership (ANCP), with a total AU$2.5 million. [43 pages] Read More...

Improving Access to Safe Employment for Migrant Women in Myanmar

Description of the document: This 43-page document evaluates the success of the Safe Employment project. It aimed to provide options for more safe jobs, implement accessible sexual and reproductive health and legal services, reduce sexual and or gender-based violence and increase social support for migrant women. The project operated in the HlaingTharya Township, Yangon and the townships of Pathein Gyi and Aung Myay Tharzan, Mandalay, Myanmar. Read More...

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