Nepal

Endline Survey of Sustainable Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Action in Nepal at Dhading and Sindhupalchowk Final Report

“Sustainable Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Action in Nepal at Sindhupalchowk and Dhading" is a Global Affairs Canada (GAC) funded the project which has been implemented by CARE International in the partnership with CSRC and RIMS Nepal. As per the new federal structures, the project covered 6 former VDCs which fall in 2 Rural Municipalities. The ultimate outcome of the project was to improve the well- being and resilience of women, men, girls and boys in targeted earthquake-affected areas of Nepal. An endline evaluation of the project was carried out to capture the performance and impact of the project. The study was carried out using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Six former VDCs where the project was implemented were sampled for the study. A total of 415 household survey, 24 FGDs and 26 KIIs were conducted to collect primary data. Besides these, spot assessments of 16 water supply schemes were also conducted.

“Sustainable Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Action in Nepal at Sindhupalchowk and Dhading" is a Global Affairs Canada (GAC) funded the project which has been implemented by CARE International in the partnership with CSRC and RIMS Nepal. As per the new federal structures, the project covered 6 former VDCs which fall in 2 Rural Municipalities of Dadhing and Sindhupalchok districts. The ultimate outcome of the project was to improve the well-being and resilience of women, men, girls and boys in targeted earthquake-affected areas of Nepal. Read More...

Baseline Study of GAC Project WASH Recovery Assistance to Earthquake- Affected Communities of Dhading and Sindhupalchowk, Nepal

CARE Nepal is implementing the Global Affairs Canada (GAC) funded project Wash Recovery Assistance To Earthquake-Affected Communities of Dhading and Sindhupalchowk form February 7, 2017. The goal of the project is to see improved well-being and resilience of women, men, girls and boys in targeted earthquake-affected areas of Nepal. A baseline study was conducted in order to collect baseline data for the logical model based on the indicators set in the Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) which will guide to set forth the project target and against which the success can be measured at the end-line.

The baseline survey included both quantitative and qualitative methods. Field data were collected during 17th to 25th September, 2017. Primary data were collected through field assessment (HH survey, FGDs and KIIs) and secondary data were collected through review of project documents and logical framework. Read More...

Tipping Point 2 Baseline Nepal

This report presents findings from the baseline survey of the CARE Tipping Point Program (TPP) impact evaluation in Nepal (May to July 2019), which is being undertaken in Kapilvastu and Rupandehi districts. CARE’s full Tipping Point Program—implemented in Nepal and Bangladesh—focuses on addressing the root causes of child, early, and forced marriage (CEFM) and on promoting the rights of adolescent girls through community-level programming and evidence generation. The approach of the CARE Tipping Point Program relies on challenging social expectations and repressive gender norms and promoting girl-centric and girl-led activism to enable adolescent girls to identify and to move into social spaces where they can challenge age-based and gender-based inequalities. The operational approach of the CARE Tipping Point Program entails the synchronized engagement of different participant groups—adolescent girls, adolescent boys, parents and community members, and community leaders—around four programmatic pillars: adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights, social-norms, girl-led movement-building, and alternative livelihoods. The Program supports the creation of public spaces for all community members to engage in the dialogue.
The Care Tipping Point Program impact evaluation in Nepal is being undertaken through a multi-institutional collaboration between implementing partners of the Gender Justice team at CARE USA and CARE Nepal with researchers in the Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and Interdisciplinary Data Analysts (IDA) in Kathmandu, Nepal.
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Social Norms Analysis Plot Final Report: SAFE Justice Project

The SAFE Justice project was funded by the Department for International Development (DFID) and implemented in five districts in Nepal (Gorkha, Dhading, Sindhupalchowk, Accham and Bajura) between October 2016 and September 2019, as part of the DFID-funded Integrated Programme for Strengthening Security and Justice in Nepal.

SAFE Justice Project aims to promote more active justice seeking behavior among marginalized populations in general and women and girls in particular breaking culture of silence; responsiveness of justice service providers with effective and gender sensitive services.

In comparison to baseline the midline survey revealed only small nuances/cracks on seeking justice for IPV. However, the end-line study conducted in this quarter has revealed remarkable changes around the empirical and normative expectations on seeking justice for IPV. This has also shown family and friend’s sanctions as well as positive and negative exceptions to change the norms. In this report, comparison between baseline and end-line assessments are presented. Read More...

Learning from the SAFE Justice Community Score Card: Final Learning Report

The SAFE Justice Community Score Card process was a local adaptation of Community Score Card models used globally and in Nepal in other sectors. Its design was led by CARE Nepal, through a participatory process with DFID and IP-SSJ partners, and focused on GBV response services provided by the Nepal police and Judicial Committees. This report details the final reflections of CARE Nepal and partner project staff on how the process worked and what could be strengthened in future. It also provides a set of recommendations for the sustainability and institutionalization of the CSC in the justice sector.

The CSC models introduced within SAFE Justice and in Search for Common Ground’s Pahunch project (around the same time) were the first to be trialed in the justice sector in Nepal. The CSC model CARE has implemented through SAFE Justice was informed by CARE’s extensive global experience with CSCs, but is also heavily based on the outputs of a co-design workshop with CARE Nepal, Search for Common Ground Nepal, SAFE Justice partners, and DFID Nepal, in Kathmandu in August 2017.1 This local model was documented and set out in a bespoke manual (SAFE Justice Community Score Card: A Field Guide for Nepal),2 and that manual was then updated and re-issued based on findings from a review and adaptation process in 2018, and then again based on the final reflection process outlined in this report (in August 2019).3
Overall, the chosen sectoral focus of the justice sector, and in particular the application of the CSC model in the midst of Nepal’s transitioning subnational governance structure, was an ambitious choice within SAFE Justice. Despite this, the process has demonstrated strong positive results, particularly in terms of improved police-community relations and community awareness of, and connection to, the new Judicial Committees.
However, the context did necessitate a particularly flexible and adaptive approach, in order to shift the structures and stakeholders involved with the CSC, in step with major political changes. While the CSC was not set up as a formal ‘pilot’ per se, CARE tried to treat it as such, scheduling deliberate junctures to reflect on the functioning of the model, hear from frontline staff on what is working and what is challenging, making and documenting concrete adaptations along the way. Read More...

SUAAHARA II GOOD NUTRITION PROGRAM ANNUAL SURVEY YEAR TWO (2018)

SII aims to reduce the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight among children under five years of age and to reduce the prevalence of anemia among WRA and children 6-59 months of age. SII works across thematic areas including nutrition, health and family planning (FP), water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), agriculture/homestead food
production (HFP), and governance, using a gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) approach for all interventions. CARE is a sub-grantee to Helen Keller International.
Annual surveys are a key component of SII’s monitoring system. The primary purpose is to monitor progress over time related to key SII inputs, outputs, outcomes and impacts in intervention areas. The first SII annual monitoring survey was conducted between June to September 2017. Similar to the first annual survey, data collection for the second SII annual survey was conducted between July to September 2018, again, among a representative sample of households with a child
under five years. Read More...

SUAAHARA II GOOD NUTRITION PROGRAM ANNUAL SURVEY YEAR ONE (2017)

The Government of Nepal (GoN) is currently rolling out the second phase of a national Multi-Sectoral Nutrition Program (MSNP), with the support of external development partners. Suaahara II is a USAID-funded multisectoral nutrition program, aligned with Nepal’s MSNP, being implemented in 42 of Nepal’s 77 districts from 2016 to 2021. Suaahara II aims to reduce the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight among children under 5 years of age and to reduce the prevalence of anemia among WRA and children 6-59 months of age. CARE is sub-grantee to Helen Keller International on this project.
Annual surveys are a key component of Suaahara II’s monitoring system. The primary purpose is to monitor progress over time related to key Suaahara II inputs, outputs, outcomes and impacts in intervention areas. The first SII annual monitoring survey was conducted between June to September 2017 among a representative sample of households with a child under five years, by New Era, a local survey firm. Read More...

Tipping Point Final Evaluation Phase One Nepal

Phase 1 of CARE’s Tipping Point project addressed child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in two districts of Nepal in partnership with Siddhartha Samudayik Samaj (SSS) and Dalit Social Development Centre (DSDC). In its first phase, the project promoted girls’ rights and choices regarding marriage in 16 communities using complementary approaches with collectives of girls, boys, and parents, who regularly participated in meetings, and advocacy events to raise public awareness and promote gender-equitable social norms. The project also engaged allies and potential champions for girls’ rights, including government and civil society, to help drive social change and direct more resources towards girls’ empowerment in project communities.
At the conclusion of Phase 1, an external evaluation team visited project sites in Kapilvastu and Rupandehi to conduct qualitative data collection with girls, boys, parents, and community members. The evaluation team’s findings indicate that Tipping Point’s iterative and adaptive strategies have contributed to several changes in the lives of girls, the actions of parents and community members to support girls, and social norms that promote gender equity. Read More...

Tipping Point Outcome Mapping Phase 1

CARE’S TIPPING POINT PROJECT addresses child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in Nepal and Bangladesh, two countries with high rates of child, early, and forced marriage (CEFM). The project focuses on identifying the root causes of child marriage and facilitates innovative strategies to create alternative paths for adolescent girls. The project conducted a Community Participatory Analysis (CPA) Study1 designed to deepen understanding of the contextual factors and root causes driving the prevalence of child marriage in distinctive regions within Nepal (two districts of the Terai; 16 municipal areas) and Bangladesh (one district in wetland areas; 90 villages) in the highly marginalized communities in which Tipping Point programming would take place. The CPA informed innovative and context-specific program design for local level strategies, including who to target, and contributed to the
development of approaches for monitoring and evaluation. As a learning and innovation initiative, the project is expected to contribute to the global understanding of the complex issues driving child marriage and different strategies that can contribute to a “tipping point” of sustainable change to prevent child marriage and create viable alternative paths for adolescent girls. Read More...

Baseline Survey of Hariyo Ban Program II

Building on the accomplishments and learnings of Hariyo Ban Phase I, the second phase is being implemented in Nepal since July 2016. The objective of phase II is to increase ecological and community resilience in Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) and Chitwan Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) across 15 districts (Figure 1). The program focuses interventions on specific working sites having common issues, threats and opportunities in the biological corridors in TAL while it works in sub-river basin in CHAL. The program is implemented by a consortium of WWF Nepal, Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE), National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) and the Federation of Community Forestry Users Nepal (FECOFUN), with WWF serving as the managing partner for the program. [55 pages] Read More...

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