Somalia

Every Voice Counts Somalia Midterm Review

Overall, Forcier’s research showed CARE to have maintained a healthy program implementation during the first half of the Every Voice Counts (EVC) program, resulting in gains within the domains of the EVC program’s theory of change. More specifically, CARE’s programmatic efforts between 2016-2018 focused entirely on Domains 1-3 relating to the empowerment of women and youth, capable civil society organizations (CSOs), and responsive public authorities and power holders. Nevertheless, the intertwined nature of the four domains of change allowed for results to organically occur within the fourth domain, which aims to establish effective spaces for dialogue and negotiations, as well. [64 pages] Read More...

BRIDGES Project Baseline Report

CARE International commissioned a consultancy to conduct the BRIDGES baseline study in Mogadishu, Garowe, Galkacyo, Kismayo and Hargeisa Districts in December 2017. The main objective of the baseline study was to establish a baseline measurement for the BRIDGES project objectives, results and indicators which will be used as benchmarks against which progress of achievements, as well as impact, effectiveness and efficiency of the project will be measured and evaluated using verifiable indicators presented in the logical framework during the project implementation phase. The specific objectives of the baselines study were:
1. Determine the baseline status on all indicators as established in the project’s log-frame
2. To review the relevance, feasibility and targets of indicators established in the project’s
log-frame and provide recommendations on possible improvements
3. To provide a baseline understanding of the market/employment situation
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Strengthening Civil Organizations and Public Sector Engagements in Somalia (SCOPES) Project Final Evaluation

Somalia is slowly recovering from more than two decades of instability and state fragility, with insecurity in the country continuing to limit access and provision of aid. The fragile context triggered development of a wide variety of Civil Society Organizations(CSOs) which are mainly working to restore trust between state and citizens, considering that Somali citizens never had the experience of an inclusive, accountable and responsive government and state.
Strengthening Civil Organisations and Public Sector Engagements in Somalia (SCOPES) project is a 26 months’ intervention funded by the European Union and implemented by CARE in partnership with WARDI Relief and development Initiatives and MUDAN Youth Network. The final evaluation for the project was facilitated by DANSOM. [37 pages] Read More...

Evaluation of the 2017 Somalia Humanitarian Cash-Based Response

Cash Based Assistance (CBA) has been used by humanitarian organisations in Somalia to assist people in need since 2003. After several years of poor rainfall, the humanitarian community responded to a famine alert issued in January 2017 with a significant scale-up of funding and programmes. Having originally published a 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) in November 2016, by May 2017, the Somalia Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) revised the HRP upwards to target 5.5 million people needing assistance. The United Nations (UN), Red Cross, Red Crescent Movement and numerous international and national NGOs delivered a wide variety of life-saving and livelihood support CBA to vulnerable people across the country. [72 pages] Read More...

Quenching the Thirst Baseline

CARE and its principal partner, the Ministry of Water Resources (MoWR) in Somaliland, have just concluded implementation of a 30-month project titled Haraad Reeb, which was funded by BMZ – Germany Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The thrust of the project was to build the resilience of target communities against drought-related shocks. The project focused on rural semi-sedentary populations living in small village-towns and spread across the eastern regions – Togdheer, Sool and Sanaag. Some activities were also implemented in Sahil, Hargeisa and Awdal regions.
The project performance against set indicators was excellent; indictors were met or surpassed. Implementation effectiveness was evident in the wide coverage, beneficiary participation, gender considerations, coordination mechanism, and in monitoring and evaluation strategies. CARE-MoWR had a robust working relationship, outlined in a joint MoU and applied at all levels – national, regional, districts and village. CARE had sufficient, qualified and motivated project staff while MoWR attached an engineer to the project.
Backed by evidence, the project designers realized that insufficiency of investments is not the core problem facing the rural water supply subsector. The core problem was identified as poor strategies to support operation and maintenance of the established systems. Due to this problem, there has been little to show for millions of dollars that the INGOs and UN agencies have invested in the subsector over the last two decades (1995-2015).
At the policy level, the project addressed the institutional lacuna that has existed regarding community management of water systems. This was done by supporting the MoWR to develop the community water management manual. The evaluation found that the manual is a great step forward. However, it also found that the manual requires review, consensus, reediting and advocacy with a view to giving it a national appeal, acceptance and application. In particular, the proposed 3-person management unit is too restrictive and not adequate for inclusive and participatory regime. Read More...

Emergency Food Assistance for Somalis

With funds from the United States Agency for International Development/Food for Peace USAID/FFP), CARE implemented the Emergency Food Assistance for Somalis (EFAS) project from April 2017-May 2018 in the Sanaag and Sool regions of Somalia/Somaliland benefiting 13,882 households. Respondents and CARE felt that the impact was positive. The cash transfer helped recipients met basic needs, improve credit, positively impacted local markets and promoted impendence for women in shopping. Mobile money was an efficient delivery mechanism allowing for a fast project start-up, and beneficiaries access to fund. Mobile money service providers were inefficient in coordinating for service delivery but CARE took measures to counter this. CARE’s project approaches were efficient especially the use of the Biometric Beneficiaries Registration System, expeditated administrative processes, and staff deployment, but they were also viewed as bureaucratic. (41 pages) Read More...

Emergency Food Assistance for Somalis After Action Review

CARE implemented the Emergency Food Assistance for Somalis (EFAS) project over twelve months (April 2017 – March
2018) the Sool and Sanaag regions of Somalia/Somaliland. With funding from USAID, the project provided unconditional cash transfers to communities in need in 135 villages under Caynabo, Lascanod, Cerigabo, Celafweyn and Badhan Districts to 13,182 households (HH). As part of the project evaluation, CARE sought to complete an After-Action Review (AAR) with the staff who supported the project implementation. (26 pages) Read More...

Adaptation Learning Programme (ALP) for Africa Narrative Report

This 103 page report for the Adaptation Learning Programme (ALP) covers an extension period from July 2015 to June 2017. The extension period was funded by UKAid at the Department for International Development and Denmark’s Fund for Climate and Environment for NGOs managed by Civil Society in Development, as well as funds from the Australian Development Agency. The original ALP goal was maintained in the extension period: ‘to increase the capacity of vulnerable households in sub-Saharan Africa to adapt to climate variability and change,’ while the purpose was slightly modified: ‘Community-based adaptation (CBA) approached for vulnerable communities incorporated into development policies and programmes in Ghana, Kenya, and Niger, and replication ongoing in other countries in Africa.’ Read More...

Haraad reeb (quenching the thirst) ii final report

This 74 page report highlights the impacts of the German-government funded Haraad Reeb project. CARE and its principal partner, the Ministry of Water Resources (MoWR) in Somaliland, have just concluded implementation of a 30-month project titled Haraad Reeb, which was funded by BMZ – Germany Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The thrust of the project was to build the resilience of target communities against drought-related shocks. The project focused on rural semi-sedentary populations living in small village-towns and spread across the eastern regions – Togdheer, Sool and Sanaag. Some activities were also implemented in Sahil, Hargeisa and Awdal regions.
The project performance against set indicators was excellent; indictors were met or surpassed. Implementation effectiveness was evident in the wide coverage, beneficiary participation, gender considerations, coordination mechanism, and in monitoring and evaluation strategies. CARE-MoWR had a robust working relationship, outlined in a joint MoU and applied at all levels – national, regional, districts and village. CARE had sufficient, qualified and motivated project staff while MoWR attached an engineer to the project.
Backed by evidence, the project designers realized that insufficiency of investments is not the core problem facing the rural water supply subsector. The core problem was identified as poor strategies to support operation and maintenance of the established systems. Due to this problem, there has been little to show for millions of dollars that the INGOs and UN agencies have invested in the subsector over the last two decades (1995-2015).
At the policy level, the project addressed the institutional lacuna that has existed regarding community management of water systems. This was done by supporting the MoWR to develop the community water management manual. The evaluation found that the manual is a great step forward. However, it also found that the manual requires review, consensus, reediting and advocacy with a view to giving it a national appeal, acceptance and application. In particular, the proposed 3-person management unit is too restrictive and not adequate for inclusive and participatory regime. Read More...

Diriswanaag food security and livelihoods baseline survey report

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