Tanzania

TAMANI (Tabora Maternal and Newborn Health Initiative) Impact Evaluation

According to the 2015-2016 DHS survey, Tabora region has the highest percentage population (45.8%) in the lowest wealth quintile in the country, which reflects high levels of structural inequality that have a direct bearing on reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health outcomes.(2) Polygamy is most prevalent in the Western zone with approximately one-third of marriages polygamous, contributing to high fertility rates. Tabora has a low contraceptive prevalence rate of 21.9%, and the Western Zone has the highest levels of teenage childbearing in Tanzania (38%). The latest DHS survey (2015-2016) indicated that 44.3% of women in Tabora deliver at home.

Given this context, the international aid organization CARE began reproductive health programming in Tabora in 2012 with the aim of improving maternal and reproductive health. This paper presents an impact evaluation of CARE’s second stage of reproductive, maternal and newborn health programming in Tabora, the Tabora Maternal and Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI), which builds on the experience of CARE in the region and spans from 2017-2021. Read More...

Tabora Maternal & Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI): Year 4 results

The Tabora Maternal and Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI) is a five-year project led by CARE in partnership with the Government of Tanzania’s Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children (MoHCDGEC) and the Prime Minister’s Office for Regional and Local Government (PO-RALG). Implementing partners include the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada (SOGC), the Association of Gynecologists and Obstetricians of Tanzania (AGOTA), the Canadian Society for International Health (CSIH), McGill University’s Institute for Health & Social Policy, and Ifakara Health Institute (IHI). The project is financially supported by the Government of Canada and is closely aligned to Government of Tanzania (GoT) health polices, strategies and guidelines.
The Annual Report covers the period of April 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021.The report provides an analysis on operations to date against the Year Four Annual Work Plan. This report also highlights how the project
pivoted to respond to the COVID-19 global pandemic and includes reporting on COVID response programming as approved by GAC in March 2020. Read More...

COVID-19 Response in Tabora Tanzania (Bloomberg)

CARE Tanzania builds on its successful partnership with the Government of Tanzania’s Regional Health Management Team (RHMT) in Tabora Region. Leveraging funding from the Government of Canada as part of the Tabora
Maternal Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI), CARE’s Bloomberg-funded COVID-19 activities builds on efforts to improve access of and quality of health services across health facilities and communities to challenge harmful gender norms.
In partnership with the Government of Tanzania, activities cover all 8 districts in Tabora Region. CARE provides technical support and training to Community Health Workers, who are supported by the government in their duties.With the onset of COVID-19, CARE Tanzania quickly implemented a digital survey to understand the impacts of COVID-19. The majority of female respondents reported increases in gender-based violence and harassment, with COVID-19 restricting women’s access to resources and decision-making. Read More...

Taking Care of Our Mountains

On Friday December 11, we celebrated International Mountain Day, which was designated in 2003 by the United Nations to bring attention to the vital importance of conserving mountain ecosystems and the critical environmental services they provide.
To highlight the importance of mountain ecosystems and uplift the voices of women, girls, and other marginalized groups that suffer disproportionately from their destruction, we are sharing a report that outlines some of CARE’s initiatives to protect mountains. Developed in collaboration with and under the leadership of CARE Peru, this report highlights inclusive and innovative solutions for mountain conservation by showcasing three case studies from CARE Peru, CARE Ecuador, and CARE Nepal and examples from CARE Tanzania and CARE Guatemala. [20 pages]. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Go Green Project in Tanzania: Access To Sustainable Energy Solutions in Moshi, Hai and Same Districts in Kilimanjaro Region

The Go Green was a three-year project (2017-2019) seeking to increase the number of women in Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania, who adopt and directly benefit from clean energy products through an innovative market-based approach. The objective of this evaluation was to assess the efficiency, effectiveness, relevance, and sustainability (evaluation criteria) of project implementation and, in particular, to document the results of the project in relation to its overall objective and expected results as defined in the project document. Additionally, the evaluation identified good practices and lessons learned which can be used when designing similar interventions in the future.

This project is working in three districts of Moshi, Hai and Same. The Kilimanjaro Region is one of the worst affected in
Tanzania by the impacts of climate change and variability with observed increase in temperature, decrease in precipitation levels, floods and droughts. Go Green is directly links with the private sector to improve last mile distribution at district and village level, thereby increasing disposable household income for women entrepreneurs. Read More...

A Study Report on the Link Between Land Use Planning and Rural Economic Growth through Mobile Applications in the Sagcot Area: A Case Study of Iringa Rural and Kilolo Districts

his study investigated ways in which mobile applications can best be used to link village land use planning and village economic growth so that CARE and its partners will more effectively engage key stakeholders in supporting smallholder farmers to find better ways of using their land to improve their economic wellbeing. This is because, after more than a decade of advocating for the land rights of smallholder farmers, CARE Tanzania is currently looking at how best village land use planning can, in addition to demarcation of village land and issuance of certificates of customary rights of occupancy (CCROs), help to transform the lives of those depending on land as a means of livelihood or identity.

More specifically, this study (a) assessed the extent to which village land use planning in Tanzania improves rural economy in general and the economic wellbeing of smallholder farmers in Tanzania; (b) identified and analyzed the best ways in which mobile applications can be used to link land use planning with rural economy and economic wellbeing of smallholder farmers; and (c) identified and analyzed economic, social, environmental and political factors which help or hinder smallholder farmers with formalized land rights, from improving their economic wellbeing. Read More...

VSLAs as Economic Drivers: Exploring Linkages Between Capital Available within Women’s Savings Groups and Economic Contribution to the Tanzanian Economy

Savings-led microfinance innovation aims to improve access to financial services in remote areas, especially among women. In the past decade, more and more researchers and practitioners have recognized and taken advantage of this informal financial service to help improve lives of the poor. A leading innovator in the field, CARE International, has spawned extensive household- and community-level benefits from its Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) programmes. With about 700,000 members in 28,000 groups in Tanzania, CARE is seeking to measure the potential contribution of VSLAs on the growth of the Tanzanian national economy.
This literature review shows some important insights and establishes a foundation for future research on the topic. Read More...

Village Savings and Loan Associations as Economic Drivers

Exploring impacts of Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) at micro level to understand their potential to contribute to the Tanzanian economy

Savings-led microfinance innovation aims to improve access to financial services in remote areas, especially among women. CARE International has been the leading innovator in the field and has initiated Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) programmes across Tanzania. CARE aims to increase members in Tanzania to 8 million by 2025 with the vison to help improve the national economy. CARE thus commissioned SFTZ to carry out a study that investigates the potential of VSLA contributions to local and national economies.

METHODS. The study was implemented in six villages in Mufindi district, Iringa region; four of which were assigned as treatment and two as control. Treatment villages had 9 to 15 NGO-facilitated VSLAs, and control villages had only two comparable VSLAs.

RESULTS. Analysis of the data at the village level did not provide evidence that VSLA initiatives have contributed to large-scale economic growth except for one risk mitigation sub-indicator. A number of issues hindered the village-level comparison: First, microfinance savings groups were also present in control villages. Secondly, the penetration of savings groups within all treatment villages was low (below 30%, except for one village).

However, at the household level, VSLA membership showed significant impacts on a number of micro-level measures of economic growth. VSLA households had higher household savings, drew on VSLA savings to overcome negative impacts of household shocks, attained greater food security and more diverse diets, achieved better agricultural and business outcomes, and enjoyed greater economic status. Although these differences cannot be directly attributed to the VSLA programme without before-and-after comparisons with a meaningful control group, the positive household impacts suggest that a VSLA programme scaled to a high density within each village could have a positive impact
on the local economy. Read More...

ADVANCING WOMEN’S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT THROUGH FORMAL FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR SAVINGS GROUPS (LINK UP)

LINK Up, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, aimed to link 10,000 Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs) to formal financial institutions; building financial inclusion in Kenya and Tanzania, assessing the impacts of access to formal financial services on VSLAs and their
members and determining whether serving such groups presented a viable business case for financial service providers (FSPs).

Over the course of this program, LINK Up partners have opened 13,165 group savings accounts and have served approximately 322,000 members, 81% of which were women.
To implement LINK Up, CARE partnered with four financial service providers; co-designing and copromoting group products and alternative channel solutions tailored to the needs of savings groups and their members. The collaborations resulted in the creation of four new group-focused products and a host of innovations in the mobile and agent banking solutions deployed to deliver those products. Read More...

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