Uganda

PROMOTING SOLAR POWERED ENERGY EFFICIENT STOVES IN KYANGWALI REFUGEE SETTLEMENT PROJECT (PROSPERS)

This report presents the results of the baseline survey on the project “Promoting Solar Powered Energy Efficient Stoves in Kyangwali Refugee Settlement”. Kyangwali settlement is one of the eleven (11)1 refugee settlements in Uganda with a population of over 12,780 refugees who mainly come from DRC (118,390 refugees); South Sudan (3,383 refugees); Rwanda (1,124 refugees); Burundi (107 refugees); Kenya (11 refugees); Somali (7 refugees) and Sudan (2 refugees) (UNHCR, 2020). It is located in Kikuube district in Western Uganda bordered by DRC in the West, Hoima district in the North and Kagadi in the South.
This innovative clean energy project is being implemented by CARE International in Uganda in partnership with African Clean Energy (ACE) and Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) and is supported by the Dutch Relief Alliance Innovation Fund. It aims at improving the accessibility of quality and affordable clean energy solutions to refugees (particularly women) in the Kyangwali refugee settlement. The project’s innovative package includes two complementary programs namely; a) The User Referral Bonus (URB) model whereby the ACE package (ACE one stove + smart phone + solar powered lamp) will be made affordable to refugees in Kyangwali settlement and host communities, by allowing for payment in installments and also enabling URB participants to earn waivers on their monthly instalments through recommendation of peers; and b) Briquetting program whereby the first ten groups (farming cooperatives/VSLAs) which enroll at least half of their members into the URB will be supported with knowledge and equipment for clean, biomass briquette production, and also empowered to set up their own briquetting businesses. Read More...

Uganda Case Study External End Evaluation Partners for Resilience 2016-2020 programme

This report presents the findings and analysis from the evaluation of the PfR II Uganda country case. It is one of five case studies that were requested in the Terms of Reference (ToR) and subsequent exchanges with the PfR Evaluation Management Team (EMT) during the inception phase. The report starts with a short description of the PfR II Uganda country programme, followed by a clustering of findings and judgements along the structure of the evaluation matrix which had been agreed upon with the PfR EMT during the inception phase. The report ends with a section that lists a number of emerging observations and preliminary conclusions from this case. The annex compiles the documents reviewed, the persons interviewed and the results of the outcome harvesting workshop which was conducted at the end of the Uganda country visit. This visit was carried out by Mr George Kasumba, local consultant, and Mr Matthias Deneckere, ECDPM. The Uganda evaluation was supported by desk research conducted by ECDPM staff members Matthias Deneckere and Ashley Neat prior to the country visit. Read More...

Community Scorecard in Emergencies Learning Brief

To be effective and equitable towards global populations, humanitarian organizations must adhere to the core standards and principles on quality humanitarian response. Since the inception of ideas on the centrality of local participation in aid in the early 2000s and the more recent evolution of that concept into accountability towards affected populations, the humanitarian community has sought to turn this doctrine into reality.
Accountability in humanitarian response requires that organizations carry out their efforts in an ethically and legally responsible manner that is inclusive of the communities they are seeking to serve. Of UNICEF’s nine Core Humanitarian Standards (depicted here to the right), three specifically refer to mechanisms of accountability towards affected peoples: response is based on communication, participation and feedback; complaints are welcome and addressed; actors continuously learn and improve. In practice this could include centralizing the voices of affected peoples by engaging communities in needs and performance assessments and decision-making. Achieving this is often hindered by the constraints inherent to conflict settings such as lack of localization of assistance, communication between actors, and exploration of needs.
CARE’s Community Score Card
Seeking to actualize these principles of community participation and accountability into our programming, CARE developed the Community Score Card as part of a project aimed at developing innovative and sustainable models to improve health services. Working in crisis settings requires an understanding of the lived experiences of people, the power dynamics, and micro-politics that inform humanitarian response approaches. It also requires bridging the gap between civil society organizations, local and national governments, international non-governmental organizations, and impacted communities. Social accountability approaches do this by connecting citizens with those responsible for providing services. The Community Score Card (CSC) is a participatory social accountability mechanism for assessment, planning, monitoring and evaluation of services. Designed for ease of use and adaptation into any sector with a service delivery scenario, the CSC brings together users and providers of a particular service or program to jointly identify service utilization and provision challenges, mutually generate solutions, and work in partnership to implement and track the effectiveness of those solutions in an ongoing process of quality improvement. The CSC has five phases: (I) planning and preparation; (II) conducting the scorecard with the community; (III) conducting the scorecard with service providers; (IV) interface meeting where the all parties present their findings in the presence of duty-bearers and then jointly develop action plans; and (V) monitoring of the action plans and evaluation of overall process. Read More...

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

Evidence Review of Women’s Groups and COVID-19: Impacts, Challenges, and Policy Implications for Savings Groups in Africa

It has been more than a year since COVID-19 lockdowns began, and economic recovery is a top priority for governments, donors, and international financial institutions (IFIs) worldwide, including in sub-Saharan Africa. Targeted investments that increase community resilience and spur economic growth will mitigate some of the negative economic consequences of this crisis. Investment in women’s economic resilience and social support is para- mount, considering that the crisis may reverse recent progress in gender equality. Around the world, women’s groups, such as self- help groups, savings groups, and health groups, play an important role in communities; evidence shows promise in their role in promoting women’s empowerment and economic outcomes. They encompass many models, but all bring women together around a shared purpose, such as financial inclusion, livelihoods, health, and women’s rights.
This brief focuses on one specific type of women’s group in sub-Saharan Africa: savings groups. Savings groups are a common form of women’s group and serve as a reliable mechanism for people in sub-Saharan Africa to save money. Members of savings groups pool small weekly savings into a common fund, which members can then borrow against, creating opportunities for investments and women’s empowerment. Savings groups show mixed, but promising, results in improving economic and social outcomes. This brief, written by a consortium of researchers and practitioners, presents emerging evidence from studies in diverse African contexts— with a deep dive into Nigeria and Uganda—on how COVID-19 has affected savings groups and how these groups have helped mitigate the pandemic’s negative consequences in sub-Saharan Africa.
This report is 23 pages long. Read More...

Digital Subwallets and Household Dialogues

This document reports the results of a women's financial inclusion intervention in rural Uganda from 2017 to 2019. Two innovations were tested among adult females: (1) a mobile banking service with digital subwallet folders labelled for women and (2) the same service coupled with a course of seven household counselling sessions aimed at equalizing the influence of women and men in the context of family money management.

The theory of change underpinning the project recognized that women's power over their own money, as well as their participation in household decision-making were very limited. Providing married women with greater autonomy and voice in household decision-making, it was proposed, would facilitate achievement of their own financial goals especially those believed to alleviate poverty, such as keeping children in school. The mobile banking service was meant to provide privacy and autonomy, while achieving voice was expected to occur as the result of the couples counselling sessions, which emphasized transparency, sharing, and collaboration. Importantly, the theory of change recognized that women's experience of empowerment takes place in the context of a struggle against disempowerment and often entails group solidarity.

The research was multimethod: a randomized controlled trial (RCT), administration of two scientifically validated psychological scales, bank data on the accounts, two exhaustive surveys, and 100 semi-structured interviews. The sample size was 1,423. The research design had two treatment groups and a control. Read More...

Uganda COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

The novel corona virus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic has been widely reported to have distinct gendered implications in countries around the world.1 This rapid gender analysis (RGA) seeks to explore the implications of COVID 19 in specific areas in northern Uganda to inform current CARE Uganda programming in the region, as well as to serve as reference to any other stakeholders working in the area and with similar target groups. The specific locations this RGA covers are: Omugo settlement, Palabek
settlement, Gulu municipality, Arua municipality, Moyo district and Lamwo district.

This study looks at how COVID 19 is affecting men, women, boys and girls, from refugee and non-refugee backgrounds, in the urban, rural and settlement contexts. It follows earlier RGAs2 conducted prior to the outbreak of the pandemic and seeks to identify where there have been changes of note as a result of the pandemic. On this basis, it provides a number of recommendations to donors and for implementing organisations. Read More...

A POLICY BRIEF FOR REDUCING CLIMATE RISKS AND VULNERABILITY FOR THE WOMEN, GIRLS AND SMALL HOLDER FARMERS AMONG PASTORALIST COMMUNITIES

Investments especially mining in pastoral areas across the Horn of Africa countries, while important for national development entails serious environmental impacts and pose climate risks that increases the vulnerability of marginalized groups of people who are already disadvantaged by the semi-arid topography. The women, girls, youth, and smallholder
farmers are particularly affected given that their fragile livelihoods are nature based.

The current regional initiatives aimed at building resilience of the affected communities have not adequately addressed the linkage between livelihood systems and sustainable environment management. The initiatives at national and regional levels tend to use traditional orthodox approaches of “environmental conservation” as sacrosanct for addressing all climate risks.

It is critical that any initiatives to reduce the vulnerability caused by the investments must consider that providing decent livelihoods for the most vulnerable groups is the key to achieving an environment conducive for investment. The interventions proposed in this brief, if well implemented, will address this issue; providing sustainable livelihoods while promoting economic investment. Read More...

STRENGTHENING RESILIENCE AND PROMOTING INCLUSIVE GOVERNANCE PROGRAM (STRENPO): Experiences of advocacy and action for climate change resilience

Care International in Uganda presents to you experiences and lessons learnt while implementing Strengthening Resilience and Promoting Inclusive Governance for Women and Youth in Vulnerable Communities Project (STRENPO). At Care we are using the nexus of humanitarian and long-term development to build resilience that bridges humanitarian action and sustainable development. Our approach to increasing resilience operates in synergy with gender transformation and inclusive governance.

We also show the models used to empower citizens such as engaging duty bearers, building civil society organizational capacity to engage with the duty bearers and claim citizens’ rights and provide information to citizens, build organization legitimacy and support multi-stakeholder platforms for engagement and informing policy processes. Read More...

Up-Scaling Community Resilience through Ecosystem-based Disaster Risk Reduction (Eco-DRR) Project: Baseline Report

The Ecosystem based Disaster Risk Reduction project will contribute to addressing the current challenges through a combination of activities to increase the ability of communities to anticipate, absorb, adapt, and transform towards the impact of hazards such as drought and floods, enhance the capacity of district local governments, CSOs and the private sector to improve, inclusive and effective multi-stakeholder governance at catchment level to foster sustainable development that takes a landscape approach, is risk-informed and eco-sensitive.

The study objectives were to determine the baseline status on selected outcome and output indicators as established in the ECO DRR PME plan, and to provide specific and achievable recommendations on possible improvement.

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