(Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services (ECRHS) Phase 1 Programme in Sierra Leone)

Publication Date: 01/04/2019

This report presents findings from the end phase evaluation of the Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services (ECRHS) Phase 1 Programme in Sierra Leone, which was implemented from November 2015 to December 2018. The aim of the Programme is to ‘Improve the health status of the population of Sierra Leone’. The Programme was originally designed to provide response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, but also considered a longer-term view and worked towards putting in place preparations putting in place preparations for the transition of an extended health system strengthening (HSS) effort.

The overall purpose of the evaluation was ‘to assess result and impact of the above-mentioned Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services Programme against the Programme goal and outcomes in targeted northern region of Sierra Leone. The evaluation was specifically commissioned to; 1) Assess the Programme result areas in relation to effectiveness, relevance and efficiency of the Programme, 2) assess changes made in general conditions and perspectives, 3) assess need for additional (Programme-) support in future, 4) assess sustainability of achieved results with respective to the DHMTs and Community-based Surveillance (CBS) system, 5) identify the Programme’s key challenges during implementation, and lessons learnt/best practices, and 6)generate concrete recommendations for decision making process regarding health and SRH Programming in the future.

The Evaluation integrated both quantitative and qualitative research methods. 1,608 respondents were randomly selected from across 80 communities for households/individual interviews. This sample included 1,196 female and 412 male respondents. Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were held with community members in 60 communities and 30 key informant interviews (KIIs) were done with CARE, implementing partners, state actors and chiefdom authorities. Twenty-seven (27) Community Health Workers (CHWs) and 5 Water Management Committee members were also interviewed. Also, facility assessment was conducted for -77 PHUs using the Ministry of Health and Sanitation standard tool and case studies/insight stories were further documented from the field interviews.