Final

THE EMERGENCY MOBILE HEALTH, NUTRITION & PROTECTION PROJECT IN EASTERN EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN Final Evaluation

This report is presented by Adroit Consult International following a successful evaluation of the Emergency Mobile Health, Nutrition & Protection Project in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan. This main objective of the endline evaluation was to provide information on the impact of the 3 year integrated Health, Nutrition and Gender Based Violence (GBV) project and also measure results at the outcome and impact levels. The evaluation was conducted with project stakeholders such as; Community leaders, Households of beneficiaries, Individual women and men, Children under five, Health workers, Government officials, CSO/NGO partners among others, and covered the areas of Lopa Lafon and Ikotos. The evaluation reached a total of 287 respondents in project implementation areas [27 pages]. Read More...

Ghana Strengthening Social Accountability Mechanism (GSAM) final

USAID/Ghana contracted Social Impact, Inc. to conduct an impact evaluation of USAID’s Ghana Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) program, which aims to increase accountability of local District Assemblies in Ghana. This randomized-controlled trial, impact evaluation tests the effect of two distinct efforts to increase accountability and improve service delivery outcomes at the district level. One-hundred and fifty of Ghana’s districts were matched and randomized into one of three groups: a top-down treatment group that received performance audits conducted by the central government Ghana Audit Service (GAS); a bottom-up treatment group that received civil-society organization (CSO) led scorecard campaigns; and a control group that did not receive either intervention.
Through surveys with citizens, local administrators, and local politicians and through a review of administrative data, we find that both CSO and GAS programming generally reduce citizen satisfaction with projects and services, but this is largely driven by districts that receive negative audit reports. That citizens are correctly attributing bad audit performance to poor-performing DAs is encouraging from the point of view of accountability. This progress with citizens has not, however, translated into many substantial changes in how administrators or politicians manage projects or project budgets. Neither GAS nor CSO programming improve transparency or corruption. GAS programming does reduce the incidence of partisan manipulation of public resources by politicians, and it also increases the perception of partisan manipulation among administrators. This is consistent with GAS sensitizing administrators to partisan manipulation and reducing its actual incidence among DA politicians.
CSO programming increases citizen-reported consultation on recent development, and administrators in CSO districts spend, on average, three hours more responding to constituents. Reasons that the intervention did not have a stronger impact on district officials includes (1) natural limits to the number of citizens reached by the intervention, (2) limited district government capacity and frequent turnover, and (3) local government dependence on federal budget transfers. Read More...

EDUCATION AND PROTECTION FOR SYRIANS IN JORDAN PROJECT ADA Final Evaluation

The “Education and Protection for Syrians in Jordan'' project has been implemented through CARE International in Jordan and funded by ADA. This project is designed to address the needs of vulnerable Syrians and Jordanian citizens, and targeted four urban areas of Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, and Zarqa. The first objective provided conditional cash for the protection and education of vulnerable youth who are at risk of dropping out or have already dropped out of school due to either working or due to the risk of early/child marriage and, therefore, not attending school. The second objective focused on providing vulnerable families with case-management support, following which referrals were made in order to connect these beneficiaries with both internal and/or external services. In addition, interventions included peer-to-peer support group activities, as well as one-day Psychosocial sessions (PS) implemented at CARE community centers that were focused on recreational, educational, and empowerment activities. The third objective provided small business development training and grants to entrepreneurs hoping to establish or expand their businesses. [19 pages]. Read More...

Empowering Sri Lanka’s Tea Plantation Communities Final Evaluation

In May 2017 Chrysalis in partnership with CARE International UK began implementing the Empowering Sri Lanka’s Tea Plantation Communities Project funded by Twinning’s adopting Community Development Forums (CDFs) pioneered by CARE International Sri Lanka. These platforms seek to enhance worker-management relationships so to achieve social and commercial benefits in 7 tea estates in Sri Lanka by May 2019. Since inception the project has reached over 3,500 tea estate workers living in estates operated by three plantation companies with the help of the CDFs, while indirectly providing benefits to over 16,000 worker family members. At its core CDFs seek to transform relationships between management and estate workers, while also providing the estate community with a platform through which to directly influence and shape their development priorities and solutions. Further it serves to help link the community with a host of service providers and socioeconomic opportunities. Undertaken in July and August 2019 the overall objective of the end of project evaluation was to assess the degree to which the project had achieved its intermediate and the final goal and to develop key lessons so to enhance future programming in the sector. The evaluation used a contribution analysis, and a mixed method approach to collect data (e.g. household surveys, focus group discussions, key informant and structured interviews). Data was collected from 7 participating estates operated by 3 companies: Bogawanthalawa Plantations (Bogawana Estate, Kotiyagala Estate, Lethenty Estate and Fetteresso Estate), Malwatte Valley Plantations (Uva Highlands) and Agarapathana (Nayabedde Estate and Dambetenna Estate). Using the proportionate random sampling technique 241 respondents were selected for household surveys, 12 managers were interviewed using structured interviews and 7 focus group discussions were held consisting of 86 representatives from the 7 CDFs. A total of 16 key informants were also consulted [73 pages]. Read More...

Integrated GBV Prevention and Response to the Emergency Needs of Newly Displaced Women, Men, Girls, and Boys in Borno State, North-East Nigeria Final Report

Under the European Commission Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) funding with support of CARE France, CARE Nigeria to implement a Gender Based Violence in Emergencies project. The project was implemented in Bama and Ngala Local Government Areas (LGAs) – Northeast, the goal of the project was to contribute to the protection of the lives of vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys most affected by the crisis in North-eastern Nigeria. The evaluation survey showed that beneficiaries in both intervention LGAs were aware of GBV issues and referral pathways facilitated by the project. There was an increase in the awareness of beneficiaries from the mid-term evaluation; as more respondents were more likely to make a report on GBV related incidences (i.e. sexual violence, sexual exploitation, domestic violence, sexual harassment, and forced marriages). Based on analyzed evaluation data, of the total number of beneficiaries interviewed, the following project activities were most effective in increasing beneficiary GBV knowledge e.g. Use of GBV champions - 87.5% (Ngala 32.9% and Bama 54.6%), Sensitization activities – 91.5% (55.5% in Bama and 36% in Ngala) and provision of livelihood assistance – 66.8% (43.5% in Bama and 23.3% in Ngala).
At the final evaluation, awareness amongst beneficiaries was greater in Bama than Ngala; as project-driven sensitization activities emerged as the predominant means by which beneficiaries were informed of GBV issues and accompanying referral pathways by the project. In spite of CARE Nigeria not having an on the ground presence in Ngala at the time of the final evaluation study (i.e. due to the lack of funding for GBV interventions since August 2020); interviewed beneficiaries remained knowledgeable of GBV issues and referral pathways. [122 pages] Read More...

Kinder und Jugendliche Willkommen KIWI Project III Wirkungsbericht 2020

The KIWI project has been in existence since the beginning of 2016. The pilot phase in North Rhine-Westphalia (January to September 2016) was financed entirely by donations from the alliance Aktion Deutschland Hilft. Funding from the Deutsche Bank Foundation, the RTL Foundation "We Help Children" and the UN Refugee Aid enabled us to expand the program nationwide. Subsequently, we were able to consolidate and further expand KIWI nationwide through funding from the EU's AMIF programme and again from the Deutsche Bank Foundation. The promotion of school projects for the design of diversity and encounters and the awarding of the KIWI prize are part of an accompanying project financed by the Deutsche Bank Foundation. This first impact report according to the Social Reporting Standard includes the results of the third project phase as well as the accompanying project. We also report on the development process of KIWI as a "learning" project. Further funding from the RTL foundation "We help children" gave us the opportunity to transfer the KIWI approach to primary education as part of the KIWI kids pilot project (September 2018 – February 2020). This publication also provides a brief overview of the main results of this pilot phase.

Das KIWI-Projekt existiert seit Anfang 2016. Die Pilotphase in Nordrhein-Westfalen (Januar bis September 2016) wurde vollständig aus Spenden des Bündnisses Aktion Deutschland Hilft finanziert. Eine Förderung durch die Deutsche Bank Stiftung, der Stiftung RTL „Wir helfen Kindern“ sowie der UNO-Flüchtlingshilfe ermöglichte uns die bundesweite Ausdehnung des Programms. Im Anschluss konnten wir durch eine Förderung aus dem AMIF-Programm der EU und wiederum der Deutsche Bank Stiftung KIWI bundesweit konsolidieren und weiter ausbauen. Die Förderung von Schulprojekten zur Gestaltung von Vielfalt und Begegnung und die Verleihung des KIWI-Preises sind Bestandteil eines durch die Deutsche Bank Stiftung finanzierten Begleitprojektes. Dieser erste Wirkungsbericht nach Social Reporting Standard umfasst Ergebnisse der dritten Projektphase sowie des Begleitprojektes. Außerdem berichten wir über den Entstehungs- und Entwicklungsprozess von KIWI als „lernendes“ Projekt. Eine weitere Förderung durch die Stiftung RTL „Wir helfen Kindern“ gab uns die Chance, den KIWI-Ansatz im Rahmen des Pilotprojekts KIWI kids (September 2018 – Februar 2020) auf den Primarschulbereich zu übertragen. Diese Publikation enthält auch einen Kurzüberblick über die wesentlichen Ergebnisse dieser Pilotphase. [64 pages]

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Strengthening Access to Emergency Primary Health and Protection Services for Most- affected Vulnerable Returnees and Host Families in Ninewa Governorate, Zummar sub-district

With the objective of Increasing access to quality and equitable health care and protection services for vulnerable women, men, boys and girls conflict-affected populations in Zummar primary health care centre (PHCC), underserved and epidemic-prone communities and improving civic participation of local residents, CARE’s interventions targeted highly prioritized areas of Zummar surrounded villages and Zummar PHCC in need of rehabilitation as well as continuing to provide a variety of essential medicine and laboratory supplies for NCD treatment. The SRMH service package included medication (such as oxytocin ampoule, methergine vaginal tablet and suppositories) and medical consumables including suture materials, sterile and non-sterile gauze, gloves to meet needs of patients visiting Zummar PHCC through close collaboration with the Ninawa Directorate of Health (DoH) as the local authorities are currently overwhelmed by the scale of needs to enable affected populations to return home. The project also distributed dignity kits packages to GBV survivors, mainly, vulnerable women and adolescent girls based on pre identified criteria and continued to avail safe space for women and children. The provision of safe space allowed the female patients to concentrate on their medical consultations with the doctors at the PHCC and meaningfully participate in awareness sessions delivered by CARE at the free space within the PHCC without worrying about the safety of their children.
The endline evaluation seeks to analyze the endline values for key SRMH and protection indicators as stated in the project documents in the targeted areas and to assess, impact and effectiveness of programming to successfully track accomplishments of the project, relevance and sustainability of the project after the implementation through the usage of quantitative and qualitative data. The evaluation also looked into areas of success as well as challenges faced implementing activities in Zummar sub-district. [28 pages]. Read More...

Building Sustainable Livelihoods for Refugees and the Poor, especially Women

The project “Building Sustainable Livelihoods for Refugees and the Poor, especially Women” is a sixteen-month’s project that was implemented by CARE Jordan between April 2019 and July 2020 and funded by Rotary International. The project focused on building the capacity of 175 Jordanian and Syrians entrepreneurs in order to create and accelerate local businesses through conducting small business building and mentoring sessions and distributing toolkits.
The project was implemented in East Amman area which is classified as one of the less fortunate areas in Jordan.
The overall goal of this project was building the capacity of entrepreneurs, community leaders, local organizations, and community networks to support economic development in impoverished communities; developing opportunities for productive work; and reducing poverty in underserved communities. [53 pages]
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SEMI-DURABLE SHELTER CONSTRUCTION AND THE TRIPLE NEXUS A study of the multisector ECHO-funded PAMUNOR project in southern Chad

LA CONSTRUCTION D’ABRIS SEMI-DURABLES ET LE TRIPLE NEXUS Une étude portant sur le projet d’assistance multi-sectorielle d’urgence financé par ECHO pour les réfugiés centrafricains et les communautés hôtes (PAMUNOR) au sud du Tchad

En novembre 2019, deux membres de l’équipe mondiale chargée des abris d’urgence de CARE International Royaume Uni a effectué une visite de deux semaines dans le sud du Tchad afin d’évaluer la composante Abris dans le cadre du projet PAMUNOR (Projet d’Assistance Multisectorielle d’Urgence pour les Nouveaux Réfugiés Centrafricains et des Communautés Hôtes) qui est financé par ECHO et géré par CARE Tchad. Ce projet cherche à promouvoir un environnement sûr et sécurisé, notamment en fournissant des abris semi-durables, et à favoriser les moyens de subsistance pour améliorer la sécurité alimentaire et atténuer les stratégies d’adaptation négatives adoptées par les réfugiés centrafricains (RCA) nouvellement arrivés, ainsi que par les membres vulnérables au sein de la communauté hôte. L’un des objectifs spécifiques visant à promouvoir un « environnement sécurisé » consistait à réduire les risques de violence basée sur le genre (VBG) et à assurer une médiation intra et intercommunautaire afin de garantir la coexistence pacifique – condition préalable indispensable à la protection et à la mise en œuvre de l’autosuffisance. L’évaluation s’est intéressée aux détails techniques et opérationnels de la composante Abris et a cherché à comprendre comment cette dernière s’intégrait à une approche programmatique plus large dans le contexte local. Elle a également examiné ses liens avec les différents mécanismes communautaires bénéficiant du soutien du projet. Le succès de la mise en œuvre s’explique par cette approche intégrée qui répond à la fois aux besoins urgents et fondamentaux en termes d’abris et de réduction des risques liés à la VBG, jette les bases pour la sûreté et la sécurité, et génère un environnement propice au développement des moyens de subsistance et favorable à la naissance d’aspirations et d’ambitions en termes d’éducation, de formation et d’apprentissage. Il est important de mentionner l’éventail de mécanismes qui a été mis en place par la communauté pour atténuer les conflits communautaires et la violence basée sur le genre, fruit d’un processus inclusif qui favorise la viabilité et l’appropriation. Les processus de renforcement de la coexistence pacifique, de la cohésion sociale et visant à favoriser l’intégration locale font partie intégrante de l’approche suivie par le projet, l’objectif recherché étant l’autosuffisance, et ils incarnent incontestablement le « troisième côté du triangle » au cœur du nexus Humanitaire-Développement-Paix. De ce point de vue, le projet permettrait de tirer de précieux enseignements programmatiques qui pourraient s’avérer pertinents dans d’autres contextes, au Tchad ou dans d’autres pays, connaissant des déplacements prolongés, un conflit communautaire de faible intensité, des besoins humanitaires et des opportunités de renforcement de la résilience, de l’autosuffisance et de la viabilité.

Two members of CARE International UK’s global Emergency Shelter Team conducted a two-week visit to southern Chad in November 2019 to evaluate the shelter component of CARE Chad’s ECHO-funded PAMUNOR project (Projet d’Assistance Multisectorielle d’Urgence pour les Nouveaux Réfugiés Centrafricains et des Communautés Hôtes / Project to provide multisectoral emergency assistance to newly displaced Central African Republic refugees and host communities). This project seeks to support safe and secure living environments, including through the provision of semi-durable shelters, and to stimulate livelihoods, improving food security and reducing negative coping mechanisms amongst newly arrived refugees from Central African Republic (CAR) as well as vulnerable members of the host community. A specific focus on supporting a “secure environment” was through reducing the risks of genderbased violence (GBV) and mediating within and between communities to ensure peaceful coexistence as a necessary pre-requisite for protection and the establishment of self-sufficiency. The evaluation was achieved by looking closely at the shelter component in technical and operational detail as well as by probing its connection to a broader programmatic approach within the local context and its links to various community mechanisms supported through the project. Effective implementation has been achieved through this integrated approach that simultaneously addresses urgent and fundamental needs for shelter and GBV-risk reduction while laying the foundations for safety and security and creating an enabling environment for the development of livelihoods and the growth of aspirations and ambitions for education, training and learning. Of particular note is the range of mechanisms to reduce community conflict and gender-based violence established through a highly effective community-led and inclusive process that brings sustainability and ownership. Processes of strengthening peaceful co-existence, social cohesion and stimulating local integration run through the project’s approach, seeking to catalyse self-sufficiency, and arguably represents the “third side of the triangle” within the humanitarian-development-peace nexus. In this regard, the project could provide valuable programmatic lessons to other contexts in Chad or elsewhere where protracted displacement, low-level community conflict, humanitarian needs and some opportunities for strengthening resilience, self-sufficiency and sustainability are present. [94 pages] Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

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