End of Project evaluation

New Born Survival Project (NBS) Endline Report

Care India carried out in the Newborn Survival project in Ajaygarh block in Panna district of Madhya Pradesh. The project focused on strengthening services in maternal and child health by training of frontline health workers, GNMs/ANMs and creating community awareness on health parameters to be taken care of during pregnancy and delivery. A baseline survey was conducted in the beginning of the project to record the then status of health services being provided and community knowledge and perception on the same. This report presents the end line survey findings after the completion of the project. [92 pages] Read More...

Urban Health Initiative (UHI) Endline Report

The benefits of family planning go beyond the prevention of maternal and child mortality and extend to poverty alleviation, environmental sustainability and the empowerment of women. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is committed to reducing unintended pregnancy in the developing world by increasing access to high-quality, voluntary family planning services. The Urban Reproductive Health (RH) Initiative, initiated in 2009, is one component of the foundation’s strategy that targets the expansion of quality family planning services in selected urban areas of Uttar Pradesh, India; Kenya; Nigeria; and Senegal. To build scientific evidence for urban family planning efforts, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) Project, led by the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), in partnership with the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), conducted an impact evaluation of the country-specific Urban Health Initiative (UHI) program in Uttar Pradesh, India. [102 pages] Read More...

Evaluation of the 2017 Somalia Humanitarian Cash-Based Response

Cash Based Assistance (CBA) has been used by humanitarian organisations in Somalia to assist people
in need since 2003. After several years of poor rainfall, the humanitarian community responded to a famine alert issued in January 2017 with a significant scale-up of funding and programmes. Having originally published a 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) in November 2016, by May 2017, the Somalia Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) revised the HRP upwards to target 5.5 million people needing assistance. The United Nations (UN), Red Cross, Red Crescent Movement and numerous international and national NGOs delivered a wide variety of life-saving and livelihood support CBA to vulnerable people across the country. [72 pages] Read More...

HIV/AIDS Prevention Programme III (HAPP III) in Sierra Leone

The HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (HAPP) III implemented in Sierra Leone, supports the financing of social marketing activities for condoms and the Impact Mitigation Funds (IMF) aimed at mitigating the social impact of HIV/AIDS. The project focuses on the prevention of GBV including FGC; prevention of HIV/AIDS and unplanned pregnancies as well as the empowerment of girls and women.1 The overall goal of HAPP III is to contribute to improved sexual and reproductive health of Sierra Leone. The programme was implemented from June 2013 to July 2017 and granted a no-cost extension to March 2018. This was to make up for 18 months of programme implementation time lost during the outbreak of the Ebola Viral Disease from the 24th May 2014 through 17th March 2016.

The overall purpose of the HAPP III end phase evaluation is to measure improvements in SRHR outcomes (specifically decrease of risk contact of HIV, increased use of condoms by the 15-24 year old generation, reduced stigmatization against people living with HIV and ratio of mother’s age 25-49 years who do not intend their daughters to be subjected to FGC). [70 pages] Read More...

Nutrition at the Center (N@C) Bangladesh Endline

Rates of malnutrition among women and children in Bangladesh are among the highest in the world. Malnutrition is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in many countries. Considering the serious effect of malnutrition, improved nutritional outcomes are intimately tied to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in improving maternal health, reducing child mortality and eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. CARE Bangladesh, in collaboration with Government of Bangladesh (GoB) implemented a Nutrition at the Center (N@C) program in Bangladesh with two-fold strategies that include integrating nutrition in existing community health system and promotion of multisectoral approaches to improve nutrition. Among others, the intervention includes, maternal and child health, infant and young child feeding, water sanitation and hygiene, household food productions, and gender and women’s empowerment. For measuring the impact/effect of this intervention, benchmarks on important nutrition related indicators were established through a baseline survey conducted in the N@C intervention and control areas in 2014. [118 pages] Read More...

Nutrition at the Center Homegrown Project (N@C:H)

Rates of under nutrition among women and children are among the highest in the world. Malnutrition is highly associated with avoidable mortality and morbidity. Improvement of maternal health, reduction of child mortality and eradication of extreme poverty and hunger received high attention in the Millennium Development Goals. The government, NGOs and development partners have come up with innovative ideas and intervention programs to address these issues. Nutrition at the Center (N@C) in collaboration with CARE Bangladesh implemented a program in two under-served upazilas under Sunamganj district, Bangladesh to address malnutrition as well as food security, improved water and sanitation practices, Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) and women autonomy and empowerment in terms of their role in household decision making and attitude towards gender violence. [70 pages] Read More...

Nutrition at the Center Endline Report Bangladesh


Rates of malnutrition among women and children in Bangladesh are among the highest in the world. Malnutrition is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in many countries. Considering the serious effect of malnutrition, improved nutritional outcomes are intimately tied to Millennium Development Goals in improving maternal health, reducing child mortality and eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. CARE Bangladesh, in collaboration with Government of Bangladesh (GoB) implemented a Nutrition at the Center (N@C) program in Bangladesh with two-fold strategies that include integrating nutrition in existing community health system and promotion of multisectoral approaches to improve nutrition. Among others, the intervention includes, household food productions, water sanitation and hygiene, maternal and child health, infant and young child feeding, gender and women’s empowerment. For measuring the impact/effect of this intervention, benchmarks on important nutrition related indicators were established through a baseline survey conducted in the N@C intervention and control areas in 2014. [117 pages]
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Nutrition at the Center Endline Report Zambia

From 2013 to 2017 CARE International in Zambia implemented the Nutrition at the Center (N@C) Project in 22 health facilities of Lundazi and Chadiza Districts of Eastern Zambia (15 in Lundazi and 7 in Chadiza district). The impact indicator of the N@C Project was pegged at improving the nutritional status of women (15-49 years) and children whose age was below 3 years old with a focus on reducing stunting generally. During the 4 years of project implementation, a number of activities were successfully implemented; as a result, CARE Zambia decided to institute an endline evaluation whose focus was to assess achievements on several nutrition and general indicators including infant and young child feeding (IYCF), maternal health and nutrition, food security, women empowerment, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), and program participation. The current evaluation also aimed at determining perceived or actual weaknesses and strengths of the N@C project as well as document lessons learned to inform future nutrition programming.
Data was collected from 41 health facilities out of the 46 targeted in Chadiza and Lundazi districts. A structured household questionnaire was used to collect data from women who had children below the age of 3 years in both intervention and non-intervention areas. Of the targeted 1266 women, 1195 were successfully interviewed representing a response rate of 94.4 percent. Four focus group discussions and 12 key informant interviews were also conducted. [58 pages]
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Nutrition at the Center Endline Report Benin/Togo

CARE has implemented an innovative, comprehensive five-year program (2013 – 2017) that aims to reduce anemia in women (age 15-49 years) and stunting and anemia in children (age 0-24 months) by integrating: i) Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition and Health (MIYCNH); ii) Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), iii) Food Security (FS), and iv) women’s empowerment. Nutrition at the Center (N@C) were implemented in 4 developing countries (Bangladesh, Benin, Ethiopia and Zambia). It aimed to develop, document and disseminate highly effective and efficient integrated approaches that substantially improve nutritional outcomes for mothers and children. The program’s objectives were: (i) improved nutrition-related behaviors, (ii) improved use of maternal and child health and nutrition services; (iii) increased household adoption of appropriate water and sanitation practices; and (iv) increased availability and equitable access to quality food. An additional P4P program has been experimented at household level in order to supply communities in animal protein source especially for children feeding.
In Benin, N@C has intervened in two communes of the Oueme department (Dangbo and Bonou) and in 32 villages. By engaging with communities, other partners, the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Family and the Ministry of Agriculture, N@C will build upon this commitment to improve nutritional status. In 2014, INSAE and CARE International conducted the baseline study, which served as guidelines for actions to be taken up to 2017.
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DEC Supported Emergency Response Project in Amran and Abyan Governorates, Yemen

Under the Yemen Crisis Appeal and with the support from Disasters Emergency Committee, CARE Yemen has been implementing two emergency response projects in Abyan and Amran Governorates of Yemen with the aim of responding to the WASH, food insecurity and Cholera/Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) Crisis. This report provides the findings of the evaluation of the two phases of the DEC funded emergency response projects in Sawyer districts of Amran Governorate, Yemen.
The overall purpose of this evaluation was to ensure accountability and identify lessons learned and best practices so as to feed into and inform the decision making process of the project stakeholders, including the donor, beneficiaries, and government counterparts. In addition, the evaluation aimed to objectively assess the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of the project in light of its objectives and provide recommendations for future programming. Furthermore, the evaluation assessed how the project ensured accountability to affected groups, considering the commitments of the Core Humanitarian Standards, and how the project ensured quality of implementation vis-à-vis emergency response standards such as SPHERE. [72 pages]
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