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DEC Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I & Phase II Final Evaluation Report

Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) has been implementing a 25-month program of DEC-funded Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I and Phase II, running from 1 October 2018 through 31 October 2020. The project aims to help secure livelihoods recovery for the most vulnerable households in Central Sulawesi who were affected by the major earthquake and tsunami in 2018.
In DEC Phase 1, the emergency response was delivered in the sector of WASH and Shelter to support the disaster-affected people. In DEC Phase 2, the recovery period focused in WASH and livelihood programs, particularly for female-headed households. In both phases, YCP was working in collaboration with PKPU/ HI, as local implementing partner. Overall, the DEC provided supports with the amount of about USD 1 million for 25-months project period and reached to more than 28,000 people.
This evaluation is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the project’s achievements, lessons learned, and recommendations for future actions for similar project within YCP. The evaluation focused on research questions that assess criteria in Core Humanitarian Standards: Appropriateness & relevance; Effectiveness; Timeliness; Strengthening of local actors; Communication, participation and feedback; Coordination with and complementarity to other actors; Continuous learning and improvements; Support for staff; and Management of resources, as well as assessing cross cutting Issues, consists of: Gender sensitivity; Social inclusion and; Accountability.
This report is 54 pages long. Read More...

Programme Sante USAID/Kenya Ciwara Rappor D’Analyse de L’Enquete D’Evaluation Finale

The program is part of Strategic Objective 6 (SO 6) which aims to increase the use of high impact services and improve health behaviors / practices. These services relate to the survival of the child (vaccination, malaria, diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, nutrition and vitamin A). The final evaluation takes place two years after the mid-term evaluation and four years after the baseline evaluation. The report is 55 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation Finale du Project USAID/Nutrition WASH


The Mission of the United States Agency for International Development in Mali (USAID / Mali) through the NGO Care Internationale entrusted Kurugan Fuga Consulting with the final evaluation of the USAID / Nutrition and Hygiene project in the regions of Koulikoro, Ségou and Mopti in Mali. At the end of this program, which spanned a 5-year implementation period from October 2014 to September 2018 extended in 2019, its final evaluation was required. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of the IRP's integrated nutritional strategy combining nutrition, agriculture, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) to improve the nutritional status of pregnant and breastfeeding women and children of less than 2 years. The report is 80 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation finale du Programme d’Amenagement du Delta Interieur du Niger (PADIN-II)


The Inner Niger Delta Development Program (PADIN-II) in the Mopti Region has been implemented in 24 Communes classified as vulnerable in four Circles of the Mopti Region in Mali. The program, lasting more than five years (Sept. 2013-June 2019), was implemented by a number of stakeholders: technical services and governorate, municipal authorities, NGOs and farmers' organizations. The NGO CARE-Mali was the main operator of the program, which was funded by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bamako to the amount of 7.87 billion FCFA. The goal was to improve the living conditions of 20,000 households (or 120,000 people) of agro-pastoralists and fishermen in the Inner Niger Delta (DIN) and Sourou. The report is 104 pages long. Read More...

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Program II 2016-2019

The Women-Girls Empowerment and Civil Society Governance Project (PEF-GS) called MAAYA DANBE in the local language, is funded by the Norwegian government through CARE Norway for a period of four (04) years (2016-2019) and aims to empower women and girls facing poverty, inequality, violence and social exclusion to claim and realize their human rights. The report is 82 pages long. Read More...

Etude de Base en eau, Hygiene Assainissement et Nutrition

The centrally managed USAID / Washington WASHplus project, led by FHI360 with CARE USA and Winrock International, as key partners, creates and supports interventions that lead to improvements in Water, Hygiene and Sanitation. 'Sanitation and explores and encourages innovation in the WASH sector, including the integration of WASH into related sectors such as nutrition. The report is 66 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation Finale du Projet Washplus de Care Mali Dans la Region de Mopti

The centrally managed USAID / Washington WASHPlus project, led by FHI 360 with CARE USA as a lead partner, creates and supports interventions that lead to improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene, explores and promotes the innovation in WASH, including mainstreaming WASH into related areas such as nutrition. The report is 68 pages long. Read More...

Cambodia COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

The number of COVID-19 cases in Cambodia is quite low (141) however the impact on global supply chains and the livelihood of thousands of factory and migrant workers, who are mostly women, is immense. The loss of income could potentially push families back into poverty and the value of unpaid care work which will increase during the pandemic, is not measured in financial terms, nor seen as a valuable contribution. Additionally, the growth of women’s empowerment which is strongly linked to financial contributions to the household, will decline.

Women and girls in Cambodia face inequalities in many areas such as in employment and payment, division of domestic labour, decision making and participation. Those are likely to further increase in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. An area of specific concern is in the education of girls and boys, from poor families, who do not have the technical infrastructure and capacity to support online home schooling.

The current health system does not have the capacity to deal with an increasing number of COVID-19 cases. Sub- national health facilities are considered low quality and previous health crisis showed that patients will directly consult provincial and national facilities which is going to exceed their capacity.

There is still uncertainty about transmission of COVID-19 which causes fear and creates potential for rumours causing
stigmatisation and discrimination of certain population groups such as foreigners, women working with foreigners as in bar work and Muslim groups.

Gender based violence is common and widely accepted in Cambodia. Globally, intimate partner violence (IPV) may be the most common type of violence women and girls experience during emergencies. In the context of COVID-19 quarantine and isolation measures, IPV has the potential to dramatically increase for women and girls. Life-saving care and support to GBV survivors may be disrupted when front-line service providers and systems such as health, policing and social welfare are overburdened and preoccupied with handling COVID- 19 cases. Restrictions on mobility also mean that women are particularly exposed to intimate-partner violence at home with limited options for accessing support services. Read More...

Latin America & the Caribbean Rapid Gender Analysis April 2020

Asylum seekers and migrants traveling through Central America and Mexico to the U.S. border face a range of risks, but women, girls, and other vulnerable groups—such as members of the LGBTQIA community—are confronted with additional threats to their health, safety, and well-being in their countries of origin, countries of transit, and in the U.S. As a result, asylum seekers and migrants who arrive at the U.S.–Mexico border often carry a heavy burden of trauma from experiences with violence. The lack of a system to appropriately support people on the move deepens pre-existing inequalities and exposes already vulnerable groups to additional, unnecessary, risks.

The U.S. Government’s Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the “Remain in Mexico” policy, returns asylum seekers and migrants from U.S. custody to Mexican territory, compelling them to face months of risk and uncertainty as they wait to complete their asylum processes. The asylum process itself is challenging and unclear, liable to change without warning, and largely opaque to affected populations. The asylum seekers and migrants waiting in Mexico’s Ciudad Juárez city, along the Mexico–U.S. border, face ever-present threats of extortion, gender-based violence (GBV), and kidnappings, which compound their trauma and restrict their freedom of movement and access to critical resources and services. Trauma and fear were the norm of the population that CARE surveyed, not the exception.

Lack of access to complete and reliable information made it difficult for asylum seekers and migrants— including pregnant women and GBV survivors—to make knowledgeable decisions about navigating the asylum process or finding basic services, including health care. Moreover, CARE did not find any mechanisms that allowed asylum seekers and migrants to report concerns or complaints of exploitation and abuse operating at the time of research.

At no point has there been a deliberate effort—by government authorities, policy makers, or those providing the scant services that exist—to systematically assess vulnerabilities and mitigate the risk of harm to at-risk groups. On the contrary, the lack of risk mitigation efforts has allowed several actors to emplace policies that put migrants and asylum seekers at increased risk of harm. For example, asylum seekers and migrants returned from U.S. detention to Mexico are often easily identified by visible markers of their detention, including a lack of shoelaces and the bags that they are issued to carry personal items. This visibility renders asylum seekers and migrants more vulnerable to detention or forced recruitment by armed groups, as well as kidnappings, which at times have taken place on the street directly outside the release area in plain sight of authorities. Read More...

Laos Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 July 2020

As of 29 June 2020,10,280,397 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 505,145 deaths have been recorded across 213 territories countries and territories and 2 international conveyances. To date, the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) has confirmed 19 cases, mainly in the Vientiane Capital. The Government of Lao PDR has acted swiftly since the first reported infection to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Since 13 April 2020, no new confirmed cases have been reported.

Although Lao PDR has been able to avoid the worst health impacts of the pandemic, prevention measures such lockdown, closure of schools and businesses, social distancing and travel restrictions, have had significant economic and social impacts across the country. Gender roles, relations and norms within Lao society have influenced the impact of these measures on different genders. Drawing on primary and secondary data, this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has found that the pandemic has both reinforced traditional gender norms as well as provided opportunities for men and women to work together to address the current crisis. This reflects broader gender roles and relations in Lao society in which forces of modernization are challenging and changing traditional gender norms. Read More...

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