Full Report

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis Report: Disaster Ready Project, Timor-Leste 2018

Timor-Leste is subject to a range of disaster events, including rapid onset high winds, landslides, flash floods and minor earthquakes, which tend to happen frequently but have a limited humanitarian impact. Higher risk natural disasters include slow onset events such as prolonged rains or droughts, which are particularly severe in La Niña/El Niño years, increasingly affecting communities throughout Timor-Leste. These emergencies are likely to increase in frequency and/ or severity in coming years as a result of climate change. With approximately seventy percent (70%) of the population living in rural areas, reliant on subsistence agriculture and with poor access to infrastructure, services and markets, communities are highly vulnerable to disasters. The high prevalence of malnutrition and inadequate water and sanitation pose additional challenges and impact on communities’ ability to prepare for natural disaster and adapt to the changing environment.

The primary goal of the Gender and Power Analysis is to gain a broader understanding of gender and power dynamics that will affect the success of the Disaster READY project. The objectives of the analysis are to:

- understand how gender and social norms and beliefs influence women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify gender inequalities and harmful social and cultural norms that affect women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify positive trends, factors and role models that can be used to promote and drive transformation of harmful gender norms and practices;
- identify actions that Disaster READY can implement to promote equality in women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- apply the analysis to strengthen existing activities and ensure that they are not gender blind.

Disaster READY is a 4.5 year, $42.5m Australian Government funded program to help Timor-Leste and Pacific Island communities prepare for and build resilience to disasters.

Implemented by Australian NGOS with their local partners, Disaster READY has a specific focus on strengthening the ability of local communities and organisations in the Indo Pacific region, with an initial focus in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, PNG and Timor-Leste.
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Gender and Power Analysis Report: Water for Women Project, Timor-Leste 2018

This is a Gender and Power Analysis for the Australian Aid DFAT funded, Water for Women (WfW) Project commencing July 2018-December 2022. The project will be implemented in Manufahi, Liquica municipalities of Timor-Leste by a consortium of Water Aid and CARE International, who both have strong country presence.

The project will equip each municipality to lead gender transformative, nutrition-sensitive, inclusive, sustainable WASH services to contribute to improvements in health, gender equality and social inclusion. The project will mainstream gender equality and social inclusion approaches by developing and implementing gender and inclusion responsive national and sub-national platforms. Addressing gender inequalities and social exclusion is fundamental to WASH and is embedded in each of the four outcomes of the project:

- Gender equality and social inclusion integrated into effective national WASH systems.
- Women and men share roles and responsibilities in decision making in the household and at
the community level, with a particular emphasis on WASH.
- Municipalities use gender transformative approaches to deliver nutrition sensitive, inclusive,
sustainable WASH services.
- Strengthened National WASH sector knowledge management and learning systems, including
effective exchange between relevant sectors.

The purpose of Gender and Power Analysis (GPA) was to validate the activities already considered for the project but also to identify gender equality and social inclusion gaps within the WASH sector that could be further strengthened by the project. Read More...

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