Gender Assessment

Ukraine Rapid Gender Analysis (Primary Data) May 2022

"It is no longer very scary whether a rocket will arrive or not from the sea, but it is scary that we will die of starvation.”
The lives of people across Ukraine have been profoundly impacted by the humanitarian crisis brought on by the invasion on 24 February 2022. As of 29 April, 5.5 million refugees have already fled Ukraine,1 and the number of internally displaced people (IDPs) has reached 7.7 million. Of those who have fled the country, it is estimated that 90 per cent are women and children, while most men aged 18–60 are required to stay behind under martial law. Based on current data from the International Organization for Migration, 60 per cent of the adult internally displaced population are female, while 40 per cent are male. As the crisis quickly evolves, so do the needs and priorities of women and men across Ukraine.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA), carried out by UN Women and CARE International, seeks to draw attention to the gender dynamics in the humanitarian crisis resulting from the war in Ukraine. The RGA also proposes recommendations for humanitarian leadership, actors and donors to ensure consideration of the gendered dimensions of risk, vulnerability and capabilities in response to this crisis.
The RGA is a progressive publication based on both primary and secondary data sources that compares pre-crisis data with up-to-date information as the situation evolves. This RGA builds upon the RGA Ukraine Brief (http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/rapid-gender-analysis-ukraine/) developed by CARE International during the first week of the war and on the UN Women and CARE RGA published 29 March6 based on an analysis of secondary data. For this report, the RGA team reviewed English, Ukrainian and Russian sources and interviewed 179
women and men from local communities across Ukraine, as well as representatives from civil society organizations (CSOs), UN agencies and government bodies. Particular effort was made to ensure that the voices of women and men in vulnerable situations and from different marginalized groups were included. Read More...

Gender Analysis of CARE Ethiopia-Resilience in Pastoral Areas Activity (RiPA) North Project

The purpose of the gender analysis is to provide information on gender-related rights in pastoral context and unpacks issues, factors and reasons on how gender relations will affect the achievement of the RiPA goals. Moreover, it also aims at identifying the key and existing discriminatory social and gender norms that are relevant to and responsible for perpetuating gender inequality in the pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in the targeted Regions and Woredas. To achieve this, CARE’s gender analysis framework called the ‘Good Practices Framework’ was used. The study was conducted in Somali, Afar and Oromia. Eight Woredas were selected from the 3 regions namely: Shabelle, Kebrebeya, Erer and Afdem from Somali region; Gewane and Afambo from the Afar region, and Babille and Meiso from the Oromia region. The survey, 40 KIIs and 56 FGDs data collection techniques were used to collect data from the targeted groups. A total of 402 (325 female and 77 male) participants took part in the survey. Read More...

STRENGTHENING WOMEN AND YOUTH AT RISK OF GENDER BASED VIOLENCE Challenges and opportunities for enhancing resilience, with a focus on urban contexts and adolescent girls

This learning brief documents challenges, capacities and opportunities of women and youth at risk of gender based violence (GBV), in particular in urban areas in Northern Uganda. It summarizes key findings from various studies of the Women and Youth Resilience Project (WAYREP), including two Rapid Gender Analyses, the baseline, knowledge model papers, and a qualitative assessment.
The learning brief informs WAYREP’s learning agenda which aims at:
 Gaining a better understanding of the livelihood and safety, security, and wellbeing challenges that marginalised and vulnerable communities face in urban poor and settlement settings with a focus on girls,
 Identifying and documenting effective and sustainable support strategies to alleviate challenges, namely poverty and gender-based violence (GBV), in the nexus, urban and COVID 19 context.
WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. Read More...

CARE RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS IN SYRIA: 11 years of crisis

”Life is mentally and physically exhausting. We can no longer go to hospitals because healthcare and medicines are so expensive. My children eat less. They no longer have milk because I had to sell my cows. We eat a lot less and we no longer eat vegetables because they are expensive” --- Woman living in a camp in Northeast Syria ---
* 90% of people live below the poverty line
* 12.4 million people are food insecure
* 50% of water systems DO NOT WORK Read More...

Gender Analysis Uganda – Rhino Refugee Settlement – Omugo Extension and Ariaze

Since the last decade, conflict in South Sudan (SS) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has led to an influx of refugees to Uganda. Across the West Nile region of Uganda, the refuge influx has increased the strain on a chronically overburdened health system and other services.
CARE is working in a consortium of partners1 led by MSI Reproductive Choices (MSI) on a multi-country programme across Uganda, Niger and Madagascar named the ASPIRE Project to identify, test and develop innovative, sustainable and scalable approaches with the aim of reaching some of the world’s most marginalised groups with comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).
To inform key programme design decisions, CARE conducted a gender analysis to understand the gendered dynamics around sexual and reproductive health, including barriers that women, girls, men and boys face with respect to accessing SRHR information, services and products, and present findings to the consortium.
This gender analysis provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis and how the crisis has impacted gender roles, relations and norms. The focus was on refugee women, men, boys and girls currently settled in Rhino Refugee Settlement in the West Nile Region of Uganda. Specifically, the study participants were from Omugo Extension Village 6 and Ariaze B. Read More...

Gender analysis on sexual and reproductive health Niger – Maradi

L’objectif de cette analyse est de donner des recommandations pour la conception des activités du projet afin de garantir que l’intervention s’inscrive dans le «Do no harm» (Ne pas causer des préjudices), et prenne en compte les raisons et les influences les plus profondes sur les comportements et les choix des personnes.
Le consortium en charge du projet représente un partenariat pionnier qui testera des approches innovantes, durables et évolutives pour atteindre certains des groupes les plus marginalisés du monde avec des services complets relatifs à la santé et aux droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR). Face aux chocs permanents auxquels sont confrontés les groupes vulnérables dans les milieux fragiles et affectés par le changement climatique, cette approche globale du projet ASPIRE est fondée sur un cadre de résilience. Alors que le monde en développement est de plus en plus touché par le changement climatique et les crises humanitaires, le renforcement de la résilience devient une priorité essentielle si l’on veut permettre aux groupes vulnérables de s'adapter et de mener une vie saine et épanouie, dont l'accès à des services de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) de qualité est une composante essentielle. Read More...

Analyse genre sur la SSR et la résilience climatique Madagascar – régions ANOSY et DIANA (Gender and Climate Change Resilience Analysis)

Dans le contexte actuel du changement climatique global, les situations de crises induites par ce phénomène touchent beaucoup plus les femmes et les filles qui voient leur vulnérabilité accrue et leur capacité d’adaptation et de résilience réduite. Donner un choix aux filles et aux femmes en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive permet de soutenir leur résistance à faire face aux chocs et facteurs de stress provoqués par le changement climatique. C’est pourquoi le programme ASPIRE souhaite «accroître la résilience des communautés touchées par le changement climatique grâce à des programmes intégrés de santé sexuelle et reproductive, de conservation et moyens de subsistance ».
Ce programme sera mis en oeuvre dans 3 pays dont Madagascar, avec le concours de plusieurs partenaires qui sont MSI Reproductive Choices, Care International UK, Blue Ventures, ThinkPlace et l’Itad. Le programme adopte une approche innovante en utilisant l’approche «Population, Santé et Environnement» (PSE), dont l’objectif est de «renforcer la résilience par des approches intégrées de la santé sexuelle et reproductive, du changement climatique et de la population, de la santé et de l’environnement». Comme cette association est peu fréquente dans le milieu du développement, l’idée est de disposer d’un large éventail de preuves sur la façon dont la prise de décision en matière de SSR participe à l’effort de renforcement de la résilience face au changement climatique. Read More...

Analyse du genre, avec un focus en particulier sur les violences basées sur le genre: Diffa, Niger

La présente étude genre mettant un focus particulier sur les Violences Basées sur le Genre (VBG) s’inscrit dans la mise en œuvre du projet bilatéral MARTAWA ZUROMAYE au Niger et au Nigeria: “ visant à renforcer les efforts centrés sur les survivants et informer pour prévenir et répondre , aux Violences Basées sur le Genre (VBG), en particulier les Mutilations Génitales Féminines et ou l’Excision (MFG/E) et le mariage d’enfant et ou forcé (MEF) dans les communautés touchées par les conflits et l’extrémisme violent dans l’Est du Niger et le nord e du Nigeria».
L’étude a combiné la méthode quantitative, probabiliste auprès des ménages à celle non probabiliste et qualitative à travers les focus groupes et des entretiens auprès des informateurs clés (chef de villages et ou quartiers, leaders d’associations de femmes, et jeunes, leaders religieux, leaders d’associations de professionnels, services techniques impliqués dans la mise en œuvre de la Politique Nationale Genre du Niger, etc.). La combinaison de ces deux approches a permis de mesurer l’ampleur du phénomène et d’en déterminer des causes et conséquences sous-jacentes.
Les résultats de l’étude révèlent que le phénomène des VBG à l’instar de toutes les régions du Niger est une réalité dans la région de Diffa et particulièrement dans les six communes d’intervention du projet. La particularité de cette région est liée à la crise humanitaire en cours qui a aggravé certaines violences et fragiliser davantage les mécanismes de réponses existants.
Les réponses à la question qui porte sur les VBG montrent que la résolution de ces cas est plus du ressort des mécanismes communautaires traditionnels ou familiaux que du système de protection formel.
Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Ukrainian Refugees in Poland

Poland has received the majority of Ukrainian refugees fleeing the conflict. At the time of writing, UNHCR reports that 1,830,711 people have crossed the Ukrainian/Polish border. There has been an outpouring of solidarity in Poland for the Ukrainian refugees. Polish authorities and citizens mobilised swiftly. For example, a law was passed to allow Ukrainians to stay in Poland for 18 months and receive an identification card that facilitates their access to cash assistance and services. Third country nationals (TCNs) have 15 days to find a way out of Poland. The sheer scale and pace of the refugee influx is already creating cracks in the response. Many of these cracks have important gender and protection consequences. This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) researched by CARE highlights the most significant gender and protection issues for Ukrainians in Poland and flags urgent actions required to address them. This RGA of Ukrainian Refugees in Poland builds on the RGA Brief for Ukraine published in February 2022. The RGA is based on observations from site visits to Medyka border crossing, Przemsyl train station, Korczowa Reception Centre, Krościenko border crossing as well as Warsaw train station and accommodation centres; conversations with organisers at these sites – both official and volunteers – and with refugees and Polish Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs). The RGA also benefits from consolidating and triangulating information coming out from multiple reports and online coordination meetings. Read More...

She Told Us So (Again)

COVID-19’s impacts around the world are worse than they were in September 2020. Far from a return to “normal,” women and girls CARE works with around the world are saying that their situation continues to get worse as COVID-19 drags on amid other crises. Fati Musa in Nigeria says, “Women have suffered a lot during the pandemic, and we are not yet recovering from this hardship.” 55% of women were reporting gaps in their livelihoods as a priority in 2020. Now that number is 71%. For food insecurity, the number has jumped from 41% to 66%.
Since March of 2020, CARE—and more importantly, the women CARE works with—have been warning that COVID-19 would create special challenges for women and girls, above and beyond what men and boys would face. Tragically, these women were exactly right. What they predicted even before the WHO declared a pandemic has come true. In September 2020, CARE published She Told Us So, which showed women's and men's experiences in the pandemic so far. In March 2022, updated data shows that the cost of ignoring women continues to grow. For more than 22,000 people CARE has spoken to, COVID-19 is far from over. In fact, the COVID-19 situation has gotten worse, not just for women, but for men, too.
Ignoring the voices of women, girls, and other historically marginalized groups has worsened the situation for everyone—not just for women. Men are more than twice as likely to report challenges around livelihoods, food insecurity, and access to health care as they were in 2020, and are three times more likely to report mental health challenges—although they are still only two-thirds as likely as women to report mental health as a priority. As women burn through their coping strategies and reserves, men are also facing bigger impacts over time.

Women have stepped up to the challenge—especially when they get support from each other and opportunities to lead. They are sharing information, preventing COVID-19, and using their resources to support other members of their communities. 89% of women in savings groups in Yemen are putting some of their savings to help others. Women are stepping into leadership roles, "We are women leaders in emergency . . . we have the capacity to say: I have a voice and a vote, I am not going to stay stagnant . . . (participant, Colombia). In Niger, women are saying, “Now we women are not afraid to defend ourselves when a decision does not suit us. We will say it out loud because our rights are known and we know the ways and means to claim our rights.”

Those accomplishments are impressive, but they come at a cost. The constant struggle for their rights, and for even the most basic necessities, is taking its toll. Women are almost twice as likely to report mental health challenges as they were in 2020. As one woman in Iraq describes, “If any opportunity appeared, the man would be the favorite . . . This psychologically affected many women, as they turned to household work which included preparing food and cleaning only.”

To understand these challenges and create more equitable solutions, CARE invests in listening to women, men, and people from marginalized groups to understand the challenges they face, what they need, and the ways in which they lead through crisis. This report represents the voices of more than 22,000 people in 23 countries since September of 2020.
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