Gender Assessment

BASELINE SURVEY AND GENDER ANALYSIS FOR “STAND UP, SPEAK OUT: BREAKING THE SILENCE AROUND GENDER BASED VIOLENCE AMONG ETHNIC MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN NORTHERN VIETNAM”

CARE Vietnam (CVN) in coordination with stakeholders is implementing the Project titled Stand Up, Speak Out: Breaking the silence around gender based violence among ethnic minority communities in Northern Vietnam, which is a part CARE’s Remote Ethnic Minority Women’s Program. In CVN’s programming, Gender based violence (GBV) is considered as one of the three focus thematic areas. Within the REMW Program, GBV will be addressed through three dimensions: a) Protection (legal protection, literacy, reform), b) Prevention and Response (engaging with initiatives of others, promoting access to services), and c) expanding the scope of the national agenda to focus on GBV. ”Stand Up, Speak Out” project (SUSO) aims to promote all of the three dimensions for addressing GBV: Protection (legal protection, literacy, reform), through Prevention and Response (engaging with initiatives of others, promoting access to services) and through expanding the scope of the national agenda to focus on GBV.
Proposed actions will challenge the harmful gender norms that accept and normalize GBV in ethnic minority communities, by taking a multi-level, multi-sectoral approach. The project will tackle the taboo nature of GBV by increasing the awareness and understanding about GBV among ethnic minority community members, authorities and service providers. It will work with service providers to improve the support services available for ethnic minority survivors of GBV. At the policy level the project will strengthen implementation of the National Action Plan on GBV through the development of tools and processes that align with the National Action Plan’s priorities and by undertaking advocacy in partnership with an alliance of Vietnamese civil society organisations (CSOs). The project will use a rights based approach to tackle intersectional discrimination by targeting ethnic minority groups in remote and rural areas and being sensitive to GBV survivors with disabilities.
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Livelihoods Advancement for Marginalized Populations (LAMP)

CARE International’s Livelihood Advancement for Marginalized Populations (LAMP) project aims to create job opportunities and address the constraints faced by marginalized populations – Internally Displaced People (IDP), returnees, women, and youth – in securing jobs and business opportunities.
This gender analysis and baseline survey for the LAMP project is intended to create benchmarks for its key indicators and to help LAMP prioritize its interventions. The findings of this study will be used to create the baseline values of the key outcome indicators outlined in the LAMP Activity Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Plan (AMELP) and inform appropriate interventions regarding livelihoods advancement and gender related activities.
CARE/LAMP and CBMC purposively selected the four provinces of Kabul, Khost, Ghazni and Balkh as intervention areas under LAMP. Random sampling was used to select a sub-group of intervention household groups and systematic random sampling was used to select a control group of respondents. Data collection enumerators and field supervisors were trained on the data collection tools and methodology to trail the approach with a sub-set of households prior to the survey. Focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) with secondary stakeholders provided qualitative and local context and a means to triangulate household survey findings. CBMC conducted three FGDs and three KIIs in each province, except for Kabul where KIIs were not possible due to the time constraints of government stakeholders and officials. The secondary stakeholders reached in this study were the MORR, MOWA, MAIL and MOLSAMD. Read More...

Rapid Gender and Protection Analysis Cyclone Kenneth Response Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique

On 25 April 2019, as Mozambique was responding to the devastation caused by Cyclone Idai five weeks previously, Tropical Cyclone Kenneth hit the northern part of the country causing widespread devastation, flooding and displacement.
In a part of Mozambique experiencing significant poverty and instability caused by complex conflict dynamics1, women, men, boys and girls in the province of Cabo Delgado had limited resilience to withstand the shock of a cyclone. Early reports indicated that certain groups were hit particularly hard, including female-headed households, pregnant and lactating women, people with disabilities, the elderly, and boys and girls. This was confirmed by the Rapid Gender and Protection Analysis (RGPA).
COSACA,2 a consortium comprised of CARE International, Oxfam and Save the Children, identified four districts of the Cabo Delgado province to focus its analysis based on ongoing and planned operations: Ibo, Quissanga, Macomia and Metuge Districts as well as Pemba Town. The RGPA was built up progressively over the data collection period through 39 focus group discussions (FGD), 34 key informant interviews (KII) and observational safety audits.
Mozambique has the thirteenth highest level of women’s participation in parliament in the world yet, at the same time, a third of women report experiencing violence, reflecting entrenched gender inequalities within society.3 These inequalities contribute to women and girls appearing to be the worst-affected by Cyclone Kenneth, subject to greater food insecurity and increased risk of gender-based violence. This is in line with global evidence on the disproportionate, gendered impact of disasters and conflict.4 Humanitarian responders must account for the different experience of crisis felt by women, men, boys and girls, and ensure actions are tailored accordingly. Moreover, those responsible for recovery programming should use the opportunity to address inequalities and transform harmful gender norms where possible. Read More...

Inter-agency Rapid Gender Analysis and GBV Assessment – DRC Refugee Influx, Uganda

Overstretched and underfunded, the humanitarian response for the influx of DRC refugees into Uganda is struggling to meet the large basic needs. This Inter-Agency Rapid Gender Analysis and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) assessment was conducted with the objective of understanding the gender dimensions of the crisis, and needs and vulnerabilities of the refugees in order to inform a more gender responsive humanitarian response. In particular, it aimed to identify the specific GBV risks and vulnerabilities facing the affected population, and provide targeted recommendations to both CARE and other humanitarian actors on how to address these gaps and vulnerabilities.
GBV is a daily reality in Eastern DRC – both within and outside of the ongoing conflicts. Sexual violence has been a longstanding weapon of war used by parties to the conflicts and, increasingly, this sexual violence has extended through to every-day perpetration by civilians. This violence is situated within a society with deeply rooted discriminatory gender norms, in which women suffer entrenched inequality in all spheres of life and where a man’s worth is largely based on his capacity to provide for and protect his family. The sustained conflicts within the country have resulted in decreasing opportunities for men to perform this role, similarly so in displacement in Uganda, where livelihood opportunities are severely diminished.
This assessment found that in conflict, in transit, and in displacement in Uganda, the Congolese refugee population is facing numerous highly traumatic forms of human rights abuses, including various forms of GBV. In the conflict in DRC, sexual violence is systematically perpetrated against women and girls; and kidnapping, physical assault, torture and massacres are used against men and boys. Women and girls often face a compounded risk of additional sexual violence during flight. Read More...

Key findings from CARE’s rapid gender analysis in Rhino and Imvepi settlements, March 2017

CARE has conducted a rapid gender analysis (RGA) during the week of 12th March 2017 in Rhino and the newly opened Imvepi settlements in the Arua district of the West Nile region of Uganda. The following are a set of initial findings pulled out of the analysis to support engagement with ECHO regarding potential work in the West Nile region.

Methodology: RGA can provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis by examining the experiences and relationships between women, men, boys and girls. However, an RGA should be built up progressively, and therefore the forthcoming report will provide an initial but incomplete insight into the gendered situation within the South Sudanese refugee community in West Nile. Read More...

Cyclone Idai Regional Rapid Gender Analysis

CARE International is responding to the impact of Cyclone Idai and the associated floods in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. As part of our response, CARE’s team in each of the countries is currently developing or is planning to develop a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) for the affected regions. An RGA provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis. It is built up progressively using a range of primary and secondary information to understand gender roles and relations and how they may change during a crisis. It provides practical programming and operational recommendations to meet the different needs of women, men, boys and girls of different ages, abilities and other contextually relevant forms of diversity and to ensure we ‘do no harm’. RGA uses the tools and approaches of Gender Analysis Frameworks – such as community mapping; focus group discussions, key informant interviews, safety audit tools and secondary data review - and adapts them to the tight time-frames, rapidly changing contexts and insecure environments that often characterise humanitarian interventions. Read More...

What Works? Reducing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Sexual harassment adversely impacts people and business, it has significant physical and mental health consequences, costs business operations in productivity and efficiency, and can affect the wellbeing of all employees in the workplace. This review draws together insight on promising global approaches to addressing harassment in the workplace. The knowledge, practice, and accountability of employers and industry to workplace health and safety can therefore be based on robust evidence of what works to address this sensitive and pervasive issue. [16 pages] Read More...

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