Gender Assessment

Gendered Violence Research Network: Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment Final Evaluation – Vietnam

CARE Australia, through its partner CARE Country Offices (COs), has been working to prevent and address the issue of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector since 2017. STOP is funded by CARE Australia and the Australian Government through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP) and the Gender Action Platform (GAP).

STOP is aligned with CARE International’s organisational remit of working in gender transformative ways to cultivate gender equality and justice and uses an adapted version of the World Health Organisation’s ‘socio-ecological model of violence prevention.

STOP’s key objectives can be summarised as follows:
1. To support garment factories in developing effective workplace mechanisms to respond to sexual harassment.
2. To make female garment factory workers feel safe enough to report sexual harassment, and through engagement with garment factories, enable them to do so without negative consequences.
3. To strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address sexual harassment in the workplace. STOP works with participating factories to implement STOP’s Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention Package (WSHPP) to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less sexual harassment. This is achieved using a ‘social norms approach’ at the individual, factory, and societal levels. [32 pages] Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Um Rakuba Camp and Tunaydbah Settlement, Eastern Sudan April 2021

Since 9 November 2020, Ethiopian and Eritrean asylum seekers have been arriving in Eastern Sudan, fleeing a military escalation in the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia. Eastern Sudan is facing multiple challenges including high levels of food insecurity, flood recovery, increased militarisation on the Sudan and Ethiopia border, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of mitigation and containment measures. As of 17th April (latest situation report), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Government’s Commissioner for Refugees (COR) registered 62,850 individuals who have crossed the border into Eastern Sudan. It is estimated that 36% of the arrivals are female and 64% are male. Further estimations show that 27% of the arrivals are children (0-17years); out of which 8% are below 5 years. Elderly (+60years) comprise 4% and Adults (18-59 years) 69% of the arrivals. Of those who arrived, data as of January 2021, showed 15,056 are women and girls of reproductive age and 1,365 currently pregnant women. Primary data collection, through FGDs, KIIs and Individual Stories, took place between 16-18th February 2021, in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement.

RGA objectives were to:
• Better understand, the main needs, priorities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys,
as well as at-risk groups in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement
• Identify how CARE and the wider humanitarian community can adapt and design targeted services
and assistance to meet these needs, ensuring we do no harm. Read More...

CARESOM RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS AUGUST 2021

This RGA aimed to gather gender-related information especially gender roles, responsibilities, barriers, misconceptions, social norms, policies, and support systems available for survivors of Gender-Based Violence. The analysis covers five geographical areas within Somalia (Somaliland, Puntland, Galmudug, South West and Banadir) comprising 10 regions and 20 districts. This analysis employed both a qualitative and quantitative assessment using desk reviews, household questionnaires, Focus Group Discussions(FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), and individual stories. In total, 2,437 households were interviewed (72.5% female and 27.5% male) while 51 FGDs and 26 KIIs were conducted. The assessment was conducted within CARE Somalia Program areas and households were randomly selected while FGDs and KIIs participants were purposively selected based on gender, age, availability, location and knowledge of topics under investigation. Data was collected by 36 enumerators (16 females and 20 males) using KOBO Collect and analysed using SPSS, PowerBI and Excel. The findings have been presented using graphs, tables, maps, descriptive and inferential statistics. Below are the key findings and recommendations from the assessment. [50 Pages] Read More...

Analyse Rapide Genre : Tremblement de terre du 14 août en Haïti

Haïti est enclin à des catastrophes naturelles de plusieurs sortes : cyclones, tempêtes tropicales, éboulements, inondations et tremblement de terre. En moins de douze ans, deux terribles tremblements de terre ont secoué le pays, entrainant des dommages énormes en vie humaine et en perte de toute sorte. Alors que le pays ne s’était pas encore remis des séquelles du premier séisme de magnitude 7.0 en 2010, un deuxième de magnitude 7.2 vient s’abattre le 14 août 2021 au sud du pays dont la plupart des sections communales affectées sont enclavées et difficiles d’accès. Selon le Gouvernement d’Haiti, on peut à date dénombrer 2 248 morts, 12 763 blessés et 329 personnes portées disparues.
Cette catastrophe vient augmenter le lot des préoccupations auxquelles est confrontée la société haïtienne en pleine crise politique, suite à la mort du président de la République en juillet 2021 et au cœur de toute sorte d’insécurité dont le kidnapping. Le pays continue à faire face à la COVID-19 qui a entrainé 588 morts sur un total de 21 124 cas, craignant jusqu’à présent des conséquences qui seraient dues aux éventuelles variantes. Ce désastre qui frappe sévèrement tous les secteurs d’activités de la vie nationale est également survenu en pleine saison cyclonique et à la veille de la rentrée scolaire. Il vient instaurer une situation humanitaire que les leçons tirées des crises antérieures permettront de mieux gérer.
C’est dans ce contexte particulièrement complexe qu’ONU Femmes et CARE, sous le leadership du Ministère à la Condition féminine et aux Droits des femmes (MCFDF) et en coordination avec la Direction Générale de la Protection Civile (DGPC), ont lancé l’Analyse Rapide Genre qui se veut une évaluation rapide de l’impact du tremblement de terre d’août 2021 sur les femmes, les hommes, les filles et les garçons, incluant les personnes en situation de vulnérabilité, afin d’éclairer la réponse humanitaire en cours en Haïti dans l’immédiat, ainsi que les efforts de redressement à moyen et à long terme. Cette étude est faite en partenariat avec l’Equipe spéciale genre de l’équipe humanitaire en Haiti et a obtenu le soutien financier, technique et logistique des partenaires suivantes : Fondation Toya, IDEJEN, UNFPA, OCHA, OMS/OPS, ONUSIDA, PAM, PNUD, et UNICEF.
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Rapid Gender Analysis, Drought in Afghanistan July 2021

Afghanistan has experienced periodic drought over the past 30 years, but none occurring simultaneously with widespread insecurity and a global pandemic—until now. The combined effects of this “triple crisis” are gravely affecting people throughout the country. Knowing that crises affect different groups of people in different ways, CARE Afghanistan conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) from June–July 2021 to assess the gendered effects of the drought, using primary and secondary data. CARE conducted in-person surveys with 352 participants (63.5% female, 36.5% male) in Balkh, Ghazni, Herat, and Kandahar; focus group discussions with 220 women; and key informant interviews with 20 people (20% women and 80% men). Read More...

Host Community Situation Analysis Impact of Rohingya Influx on Host Communities in Ukhia and Teknaf

Bangladesh became host to what is now the biggest refugee camp in the whole world. By November 2017 836,487 FDMN (Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Nationals) fled across the Myanmar-Bangladesh border to settle here mostly in two Upazilas:Ukhia and Teknaf of Cox's Bazar district. By January 2018, it became clear that this would be a prolonged crisis lasting years as the Myanmar government continued dithering about taking them back, and as also the FDMN expressed their unwillingness to go back fearing persecution. As a result of this huge and sudden influx, lives and livelihoods of the host communities have been affected in many ways. Therefore, this Situational Assessment aims to assess both the visible economic and the subtle social impacts of the recent influx on the host communities. Using Oxford’s integration conceptual framework, this assessment has been conducted to chalk out CARE Bangladesh’s future response to the refugee crisis by involving the host communities in the process and addressing their concerns so that the tension between the two communities is defused rather than intensified.
Presence of the refugees has brought about many social and economic changes creating massive pressure on the host communities. Economic activities in the two upazilas have gone through transitions, leading to the emergence of a new market system and reducing employment opportunities for the host communities.
On one hand prices of essentials have shot up almost twice as much, and on the other, due to an unpredictably large number of refugees entering the local labor market wages for day laborers have gone down. Though refugees are living in highly congested camps, they are getting aid materials as well as economic opportunity in the local market. On the contrary, the host communities are finding themselves pitted against the refugees as either their work have been taken away or their earnings significantly reduced. It is true that a few locally influential people owning large tracts of land and businesses are benefitting from the availability of cheap labor, but the poor and the ultra-poor from the host communities are bearing the brunt of these changes. Access to administrative, educational and healthcare needs has diminished. Reduced access and availability of CPR-resultant scarcity of timber, bamboo for shelter, food & cooking fuel created insecurity of accessing resources. Due to security risk of woman and girls mobility has goes down, women income earning opportunity getting reduced; all of this has evidently created tension between the host and the refugee communities and within host community households. If left unaddressed, this tension is likely to rise to the extent of creating potential threats of ethnic conflicts.
In response to these findings of the situational analysis possible types of interventions could be Gender specific livelihoods strengthening initiatives based on diversification of off/on farm activities, Transformative approach to build life free from GBV, Promoting youth leadership and Strengthening service delivery and demand side functions through Inclusive governance.
Read More...

GENDER AND COVID-19 VACCINES Listening to women-focused organizations in Asia and the Pacific

More than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed across at least 176 countries, with over 1.7 billion doses administered worldwide. Combating the pandemic requires equitable distribution of safe and effective vaccines, however, women and girls are impacted by gaps both in the supply side and the demand side that hamper equitable distribution of the vaccine. Evidence reveals that 75 per cent of all vaccines have gone to just 10 countries, and only 0.3 per cent of doses have been administered in low-income countries. Very few of COVID-19 vaccines are going to those most vulnerable. The vaccine rollout in Asia and the Pacific has been relatively slow and staggered amid secondary waves of the virus. India, despite being the largest vaccine developer, has only vaccinated 3 per cent of the population and continues to battle a variant outbreak that, at its peak, was responsible for more than half of the world’s daily COVID-19 cases and set a record-breaking pace of about 400,000 cases per day.5However, the small Pacific nation of Nauru, reported a world record administering the first dose to 7,392 people, 108 per cent of the adult population within four weeks. Bhutan also set an example by vaccinating 93 per cent of its eligible population in less than two weeks. That success could be at risk, given the situation in India and the suspended export of vaccines. Read More...

Rapid Needs Assessment Gaza May/June 2021

CARE conducted a rapid needs assessment in Gaza between May 28 and June 3, 2021 to understand people's evolving needs in the crisis there. This graphic underlines what they found, with a survey of 62 people, including 68% women, 32% men, and 16% people with disabilities. Read More...

Response to the Influx of refugees and returnees from Nigeria in Diffa Region

CARE est engagé à promouvoir l’égalité dans la jouissance des droits et des opportunités pour les hommes, les femmes, les garçons et les filles pauvres affectées par les crises et les catastrophes. Ce focus de CARE vise à améliorer l'intégration explicite du genre aussi bien dans les programmes humanitaire que de développement. Cet engagement est rendu officiel dans la politique Genre de CARE International1, dans sa vision 20202 et dans sa Stratégie humanitaire 2013-2020. Cette stratégie humanitaire met l’accent sur la compréhension et la réponse aux besoins différenciés des hommes, des femmes, des filles et des garçons affectés par les crises et les catastrophes.
L’un des outils utilisés pour améliorer la sensibilité genre des programmes humanitaires de CARE, est « l’analyse rapide de genre » dont l’objectif est d’assurer que les programmes humanitaires prennent en compte de façon adéquate les différents besoins, capacités et contributions des femmes, des hommes, des filles et des garçons. L’analyse de genre renseigne sur qui est touché (femmes, hommes, garçons, filles, femmes âgées, vieillards) ; qui a besoin de protection et comment ; qui a accès à quoi et qu’est-ce qui empêche l'accès ; Comment les différents groupes font face a la
situation; Quelles capacités chaque groupe a ; est-ce que les femmes et les hommes participent à égalité au processus décisionnel – Enfin l’analyse Genre permet de formuler de recommandations programmatiques appropriées.
CARE Niger a entamé un processus d’analyse rapide de genre sur la situation spécifique des refugiés, retournés et populations hôtes en région de Diffa suite à la déstabilisation du nord-est du Nigeria. Un premier rapport a été partagé vers le 25 Août consacrant une première étape de cette analyse en zone peri-urbaine. Ce deuxième rapport complète le premier avec cette fois-ci la situation en zone rural dans la commune de Bosso. Read More...

Nepal Second Phase COVID-19 RGA

Nepal is currently undergoing the devastating effects of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. With the unprecedented surge in COVID-19 infections, the government of Nepal imposed prohibitory orders since April 29 in Kathmandu valley. Similarly, District Administration Offices (DAOs) in 75 out of 77 districts in the country have enforced prohibitory orders to break the chain of COVID-19 spread.1 As the country is reeling under the weight of increasing infections and death rates with fragile health infrastructure, there has been less attention to and evidence on gender and socio-economic impacts of the crisis on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.
Global evidence from the previous year suggests that the pandemic led to disruption of social, political and economic systems and deepening of pre-existing gender and social inequalities. UN study 2020 highlights that the distribution of effect of any disaster or emergency correlates with the access to resources, capabilities, and opportunities which systematically make certain groups more vulnerable to the impact of emergencies, in particular women and girls.2 Women and girls in Nepal are particularly vulnerable to the immediate and long-term health and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic because of the pervasive inequalities in gender norms and structures.
The RGA conducted by CARE Nepal in partnership with Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC), UNWOMEN and Save the Children Women 2020 had shown that women’s unpaid care work and unequal division of labor were exacerbated because of closure of schools, public spaces, and care services. In addition, men’s loss of jobs and income and use of savings on gambling and alcohol had led to increased household conflict and women’s vulnerability to domestic violence. The study also revealed that 83 per cent of respondents lost their jobs; the hardest hit among them being women working as daily wage workers. The pandemic had also aggravated intimate partners and gender based violence for women and girls especially from marginalized groups such as Dalits, gender and sexual minorities (LGBTIQ++), women with disabilities, and adolescent girls. Read More...

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