Midterm evaluation

Evaluation à mi-parcours du Projet « Partenariat Contre le Trafic, l’Exploitation des Enfants et les Violences faites aux Filles aux Femmes (PACTE pour les Enfants et les Femmes) »

L’évaluation du Projet « Partenariat contre le Trafic, l’Exploitation et les Violences faites aux Filles et aux Femmes (PACTE pour les Enfants et les Femmes) » a fait ressortir les points suivants.
D’un point de vue pertinence, les objectifs du projet PACTE sont en phase avec ceux de la Politique Nationale de Protection de l’Enfance (PNPE) et répondent à des problèmes existants bel et bien dans les communautés :
 Pour 90% des personnes enquêtées, les phénomènes de trafic, d’exploitation et de violences faites aux filles et aux femmes sont effectivement une réalité, et 47% estiment que cela existe bel et bien dans leurs localités ;
 80% reconnaissent les phénomènes de trafic, d’exploitation et de violences faites aux filles et aux femmes comme des fléaux et trouvent qu’il faut s’en préoccuper.
Un an et demi après le début de la mise en oeuvre, l’évaluation révèle aussi que l’arsenal d'acteurs s’investit selon leurs domaines de compétence et parcelles de pouvoir à l’exercice d’éradication des phénomènes de trafic des enfants et des violences basées sur le genre identifiés dans les zones :
 Les acteurs impliqués dans la mise en oeuvre sont bien emmaillés sur les espaces couverts.
 Les groupements AVEC installés par les équipes des ONG et OSC partenaires de CARE Bénin/Togo dans les communes d’intervention du projet sont des creusets d’échanges qui facilitent la mise en oeuvre des activités du projet.
 186 leaders ont une bonne connaissance du projet et 6% sont impliqués dans la dénonciation des cas de violence envers les enfants et les femmes dans leur communauté. Read More...

Strengthening Rural Development Models in Georgia (ENPARD II) Midterm Evaluation

Strengthening Rural Development Models in Georgia seeks to build on the success found by Mercy Corps, CARE and People in Need as they introduced the LEADER model for rural development to the municipalities of Borjomi, Lagodekhi and Kazbegi. In addition to continuing to implement this community-led local development approach, they were tasked with providing more national-level support for other Georgian LEADER implementations with the support of ELARD, a Europe-based not for profit organisation.

A series of interviews and focus groups held with beneficiaries, implementing agencies and other stakeholders provided a very positive picture of the impact being delivered by the LEADER model in these three municipalities, particularly in terms of increased engagement with local governance, community cohesion and economic participation.

Results further suggested that the growing presence LEADER in Georgia’s rural municipalities was positively moving Georgian rural governance in the direction envisioned by the Georgian Government and the Delegation of the European Union, that is, towards a state of alignment with the European Common Agricultural Policy.

The main difficulty identified is that Georgian Government policy looking forward appears to be wavering with regards to its commitment to the LEADER model, despite the levels of investment provided by the EU. Read More...

Kore Lavi Title II Program Haiti – Midterm Evaluation

This reports presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations related to the Kore Lavi mid-term evaluation.

DESCRIPTION OF KORE LAVI. Kore Lavi’s Theory of Change holds that positive and lasting transformation must happen within interrelated domains: (1) where the effective social safety net programming and complementary services reach the most vulnerable populations and protect their access to food while building self-reliance; (2) that achieve breadth and depth in behavior and social change needed to tackle under-nutrition among vulnerable women and children; and (3) that institutionalize accountability, transparency and quality of delivery for mutually reinforcing social protection programs under the leadership of MAST.

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY. The evaluation employed three data collection methodologies: document review, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions.

PRIMARY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS.
At the time of the MTE, Kore Lavi had completed data collection in 16 communes demonstrating the ability to adapt and innovate to address the initial data quality problems that existed at the beginning of the program.

In terms of its implementation on the ground, the food voucher scheme is operating well in identifying voucher recipients and enrolling them in the program, distributing food to beneficiaries via paper or electronic vouchers, recruiting and managing the network of collaborating vendors, enforcing policies governing the scheme and overseeing operations. Food received by beneficiary households from both paper and electronic vouchers is inevitably shared with non-household members, including neighbors and even strangers. The VSLA scheme has effectively provided a mechanism by which large numbers of vulnerable women and men living in program communities can save and access small loans at reasonable interest rates to invest in their businesses or children’s education or for other purposes.

SO3 social behavioral change communications interventions are, on the whole, well designed and well implemented. Care Groups, moreover, appear to be an effective methodology for mobilizing women and communicating critical SBCC messages. Community health agents and Lead Mothers play a critical role in SO3 activities. While they are, for the most part, doing a good job and are satisfied with their roles, they also have a number of legitimate concerns related to the lack of monetary compensation and reimbursement for expenses incurred. The program has done a good job identifying and reaching the targeted women and infants.

Kore Lavi has taken a holistic approach to gender integration from design to implementation and has made a conscious and good faith effort to integrate gender considerations in each of the four program SOs.

Kore Lavi has prioritized information management and has demonstrated a clear institutional interest in improving knowledge and learning.

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Mid-Term Strategic Review of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity

CARE commissioned a Mid-Term Strategic Review (MTSR) of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity to formulate recommendations for the remaining life of the project to increase effectiveness in achieving sustainable impact. The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is being implemented in 27 Woredas in the three regions of Tigray, Amhara, and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples and is just over the midway point in its five-year life from December 5, 2016, through December 3, 2021. The purpose of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is to reduce food insecurity and increase resilience for 97,900 chronically food insecure households that are enrolled in the fourth cycle of the Government of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP4), enabling them to graduate with resilience from the PSNP4.

The MTSR for the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity was a formative evaluation exercise intended to provide guidance on ways to improve the effectiveness of the program in achieving intended impact.

Relative to the four global learning questions for the MTSR (see page 4), the MTSR found that the model that the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is implementing is effective for achieving graduation with resilience, but because frontline delivery is constrained by the number of staff, their technical capacities and the degree of supervision and support that they receive, interventions are not always going deeply enough to ensure behavioral change. The program is empowering women both economically and socially through the VESA platform, but there are significant variations between regions; and outside of the VESA, there is some evidence to suggest that women’s empowerment has not yet been well incorporated, especially in value chain participation and MFI linkages. Progress is certainly being made in transferring ideas and knowledge to PSNP counterparts, but that has not yet translated into practice mainly because of resource constraints. Key approaches that need to be added or strengthened in the coming two years include expanding frontline delivery capacities, expanding efforts to ensure that strategies and approaches are well understood by implementation staff at all levels in all partners, ensuring that women’s empowerment is included in all approaches by all partners, and looking for new ways to facilitate access to jobs, either through self-employment or wage employment, for youth from PSNP households.

The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is already doing some very nice work in starting to achieve sustainable impact. The project has strong potential to be recognized as a “great” project if it can make some adjustments.
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Midline Report of the HALOW+ Health Intervention

HALOW+ (an extension of the Health Access and Linkage Opportunities for Workers project) is a partnership among GSK, M&S, and CARE, aimed at increasing Bangladeshi factory workers’ knowledge, empowerment, and access to health services. These workers often have low economic and social status, making it difficult for them to advocate for their needs. Because there is significant room for improvement in workers’ health (e.g., anemia is prevalent), and improved health is not just a benefit to workers but also facilitates greater productivity, this project combines the expertise of the three partner organizations to improve worker health and factory outcomes. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

Revue à mi-parcours « Projet d’appui à la filière halieutique (PAFHa) au Mali »

L’objectif global du PAFHa est de « Contribuer à la réduction de l’insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle au Mali ». Son objectif spécifique consiste à « Améliorer les revenus par un appui au développement de la filière halieutique ». Pour ce faire, le PAFHa vise à aboutir aux 3 résultats suivants :
- R1. La conservation, la valorisation et la commercialisation des produits halieutiques sont améliorées
- R2. La production halieutique (pêche/pisciculture) est développée par des pratiques durables
- R3. Les services techniques gouvernementaux et les organisations professionnelles sont impliqués dans le programme et leurs capacités sont renforcées.
120 campements de pêche et / ou villages de pêche ont été identifiés avec la DNP comme sites d’intervention du projet. Read More...

Safe Schools for Girls Project Midline Evaluation

Throughout the past two decades, Rwanda has made significant efforts to improve the coverage of education to ensure that all Rwandans have access to quality education through the completion of secondary school. Despite policies to increase access to basic education and increase enrolment rates, dropout remains a key issue, especially in secondary school where female students tend to have lower completion rates than male students.

To promote better educational, social, and economic outcomes for students, CARE Rwanda established the Safe Schools for Girls (SS4G) Project. Operating in the Southern Province of Rwanda, the SS4G Project provided holistic support--including academic resources, financial literacy training, and sexual and reproductive health education, and leadership training--to students to address obstacles to secondary education. As the SS4G project passes its mid-way point in 2019, CARE Rwanda commissioned this evaluation to assess trends and changes over time in students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the intervention aims, in order to better understand areas that were performing well and identify those that needed revised efforts. Read More...

Women Income Generation Through Livelihood Development (WIGLD) Project

Women Income Generation Through Livelihood Development (WIGLD) project is a project funded by Beyond the 11th. The project is helping afghan women to improve their economy and to support themselves and their children.

The project has been operational in Afghanistan since 2003. The overall project goal is to contribute to the economic development of vulnerable women. Currently, the project is operational in two sub-districts of Kabul province. The project targets 1,000 women-headed household through the establishment of 56 Community Based Saving Groups (CBSGs). The project beneficiaries receive different support such as teaching them life skills, including basic literacy and numeracy, environmental and basic hygiene, and business development skills and provision of marketing opportunities for their products.

This report is the result of a Midterm Review (MTR) conducted to find out the level of changes made toward project objectives and highlights programmatic strengths and challenges that can inform future efforts of the project in the remaining life span of the project. The review has been conducted by CARE PQ department through with support of daily wage data enumerators who have been hired for a short period. The assessment targeted 278 beneficiaries of the project and has also conducted 10 FGDs to know the insight of the project participants. Read More...

Projet d’appui à la filière halieutique (PAFHa) au Mali

Projet d’appui à la filière halieutique (PAFHa) in Mali is a project that aims to reduce food and nutrition insecurity in Mali by improving incomes through the development of the fishing industry.
PAFHa's goals include:
-Improved Conservation, enhancement and marketing of fish products
-Developed fish production (fishing/fish farming) through sustainable practices
- Strengthened government technical services and professional organisations are involved in the program and their capacities Read More...

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