Special Evaluation/Report

‘IF WE DON’ T WORK, WE DON’ T EAT’ Syrian Women Face Mounting Food Insecurity a Decade into the Conflict

Ten years ago, the lives of many Syrians changed profoundly as anti-government demonstrations escalated into violent conflict between forces allied to the Government of Syria and armed opposition groups. The resulting humanitarian crisis is one of the worst of our time – 6.7 million Syrians remain internally displaced; an estimated 13 million people are in need1 and 12.4 million live with food insecurity.

In recent months, the situation has deteriorated even further as the COVID-19 pandemic, mass displacements, natural
disaster, economic collapse and ongoing hostilities have combined to create a situation wherein households are
finding it increasingly difficult to meet their basic needs, including for food.

Average food prices in Syria increased by 236% in 2020 – and food prices are more than 29 times higher than the five year pre-crisis average, causing many families to resort to negative coping strategies. This includes eating fewer
or smaller meals to get by. Furthermore, due to the loss or reduced capacity of male heads of household to death, injury, disappearance or emigration in search of work, many Syrian women are now the sole or primary breadwinners for their families, bearing the full burden of providing for their families with limited livelihood opportunities. About 22% of Syrian households are now headed by women; this is up from only 4% prior to the conflict. Even in households where the male head of household is working in some capacity, dire economic circumstances have pushed women to find some source of income to help with household expenses. In both cases, women are thrust into the ‘provider’ role in a way that most had not previously experienced. Read More...

Our Best Shot: Frontline Health Workers and COVID-19 Vaccines

Fully realizing the social and economic benefits of halting COVID-19 requires investing in a fast and fair global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines. CARE estimates that for every $1 a country or donor government invests in vaccine doses, they need to invest $5.00 in delivering the vaccine.

Investments in frontline health workers are a critical component in this comprehensive vaccination cost. Of the $5.00 in delivery costs, $2.50 has to go to funding, training, equipping, and supporting health workers—especially women—who administer vaccines, run education campaigns, connect communities to health services, and build the trust required for patients to get vaccines. For these investments to work, they must pay, protect and respect women frontline health workers and their rights—a cost that is largely absent from recent WHO estimates on vaccine rollout costs. No current global conversations or guidance on vaccine costs includes the full cost of community health workers or long-term personnel costs.

Investing in a fast and fair global vaccine distribution will save twice as many lives as maximizing vaccine doses for the wealthiest countries in the world. Even better, investing in vaccine equality will speed up economic recoveries in every country in the world. For every $1 invested in vaccines in less wealthy countries, wealthy countries will see $4.80 of economic benefit because economies can fully re-open sooner. Failing to make this investment could cost wealthy economies $4.5 trillion in economic losses.

Current global debates are focused so narrowly on equitable access to for vaccine doses that they largely overlook the importance of delivering vaccines—and the key role women frontline health workers play in vaccine delivery. Of 58 global policy statements on vaccines, only 10 refer to the costs of delivery at all—and these are primarily technical advisories from the World Health Organization. No government donors are discussing the importance of vaccine delivery systems that are necessary to ending COVID-19. Only one statement—from Norway—refers to the importance of women health workers as part of the solution to ending COVID-19.

As new and dangerous strains of COVID-19 emerge in countries that are struggling to access the vaccine and control the pandemic, every day we wait for fair global vaccination allows for more contagious strains that spread around the world. The more chances the virus has to mutate in non-vaccinated populations, the higher the risk for everyone. Comprehensive global vaccine delivery plans that make sure the vaccine gets to people who need it—and that those people are ready to get the vaccine when it arrives—are the only way to end this threat. No one is safe until everyone is safe.
Read More...

Revue De La Litterature Pour L’etude Qualitative de L’analyse Genre Dans La Region de Mopti

Equality between men and women is one of the goals of development programs. Today, almost all USAID-funded DFAPs are required to integrate the “Gender Mainstreaming” into their programmatic framework and into their implementation in order to achieve this end. The Harande program, funded by FFP (USAID) is no exception to this requirement. This is why Harande intends to carry out a gender analysis in the Mopti region, more specifically in the communes of Youwarou, Tenenkou, Bandiagara and Douentza. But, as a prelude to the gender analysis, a review of the literature is recommended by the program. This review is based on the documents available from CARE, SAVE, HKI, UNICEF, UN WOMEN, technical services, etc., relating to gender, gender-based violence and masculinity in Mali in general and Mopti in particular. This documentary review also aims to bring out the lessons learned from the various partners, in relation to the Harande program framework and which are likely to help the program. Review is 28 pages long. Read More...

Partners for Resilience Country Case Study Indonesia (PFR)

This is a report of the findings of the Indonesia Country study which is one of three country studies being prepared as an input to Evaluation of the PFR II programme. For ease of comparison and to facilitate the preparation of the overall report, this country report is structured according to the seven generic Evaluation Questions (and associated Judgement criteria and indicators) that inform this evaluation. In line with PFR 2 programme design, the overall objective of the Indonesia programme is to localise global agendas and commitments aimed at disaster management, climate change adaptation and working with an eco-system approach. It is recognised that each country faces unique challenges, has different institutional, capacity and resource opportunities/ limitations and have prioritised their responses to these global agenda and commitments in different ways. In this respect, contextualisation to local needs and circumstances is critical [87 pages]. Read More...

Working with Youth at Risk in the Balkans Case Study

Capturing 5 different models of working on prevention of radicalization and extremism in 5 countries in the Balkans capturing core impact elements on youth, parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders/community members that is developed by CARE and partners. (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) [52 pages]. Read More...

Covid-19 Digital Response Case Study

The case study captures and documents the process of YMI’s adaptation to the COVID-19 pandemic during the period March-July 2020 in countries in the Balkans (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) and represents a unique contribution and source for other organizations that are going through the same process of adaptation [38 pages]. Read More...

Scaling up Case Study How to Transform a Transformation

Captures the modalities of scaling up of CAREs gender transformative programming in high schools in Balkan countries (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) used by CARE and local partners [33 pages]. Read More...

Taking Care of Our Mountains

On Friday December 11, we celebrated International Mountain Day, which was designated in 2003 by the United Nations to bring attention to the vital importance of conserving mountain ecosystems and the critical environmental services they provide.
To highlight the importance of mountain ecosystems and uplift the voices of women, girls, and other marginalized groups that suffer disproportionately from their destruction, we are sharing a report that outlines some of CARE’s initiatives to protect mountains. Developed in collaboration with and under the leadership of CARE Peru, this report highlights inclusive and innovative solutions for mountain conservation by showcasing three case studies from CARE Peru, CARE Ecuador, and CARE Nepal and examples from CARE Tanzania and CARE Guatemala. [20 pages]. Read More...

Integrated GBV prevention and response in Northeast Nigeria Endline Report

Context The ECHO-GBV prevention and response is an integrated GBV and livelihood project which was implemented as an entry point for CARE Nigeria into GBV-standalone initiatives. The project was funded by European Commission Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) under the supervision of CARE France. The project anticipated to provide direct service to displaced vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys and vulnerable host community members in Bama and Ngala, majority of the project participants were women and girls and indirectly benefits to the larger community. The intervention was anticipated to reach a total of 7,832 project participants. The global objective of the project was to contribute to the protection of the lives of vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys most affected by the crisis in northeastern Nigeria. The specific objective of the project was to enhance the access of newly displaced, vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys to life-saving GBV prevention and response services through coordinated, principled humanitarian support and community-based prevention activities. The project had six expected results:
• R 1. GBV prevention, care, and response services available and accessible to newly displaced individuals and vulnerable host community members at risk of or affected by GBV.
• R 2. Awareness, knowledge, and application of humanitarian principles and SEA prevention and response principles improved among humanitarian actors and security forces.
An end-line study was conducted as a part of the project monitoring and evaluation strategies and framework to review its projects before, during, and after the post-implementation phase. The endline was conducted by CARE Nigeria in August 2020 [31 pages]. Read More...

Dioptra Costing Tool Case Study Jordan

The Syrian crisis that began in 2011 has caused mass internal and external displacement — about 1.3 million Syrians have migrated to Jordan, mostly living in urban areas outside refugee camps (estimated 81%). An assessment by CARE in 2018 found high unmet needs in food security, shelter, protection, education, and livelihoods among Syrian refugees and Jordanian host community members. Many refugee children have missed the crucial years of early education: about 40% of registered school-age Syrian children are out of school and at risk of child labor and early marriage To address these needs, CARE provides comprehensive protection services to vulnerable refugees and Jordanians in Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, Zarqa, and Karak. These services include, but are not limited to, Protection Case Management, Conditional Cash for Education, and Emergency Cash Assistance. [7pages] Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all