Special Evaluation/Report

Partners for Resilience Country Case Study Indonesia (PFR)

This is a report of the findings of the Indonesia Country study which is one of three country studies being prepared as an input to Evaluation of the PFR II programme. For ease of comparison and to facilitate the preparation of the overall report, this country report is structured according to the seven generic Evaluation Questions (and associated Judgement criteria and indicators) that inform this evaluation. In line with PFR 2 programme design, the overall objective of the Indonesia programme is to localise global agendas and commitments aimed at disaster management, climate change adaptation and working with an eco-system approach. It is recognised that each country faces unique challenges, has different institutional, capacity and resource opportunities/ limitations and have prioritised their responses to these global agenda and commitments in different ways. In this respect, contextualisation to local needs and circumstances is critical [87 pages]. Read More...

Working with Youth at Risk in the Balkans Case Study

Capturing 5 different models of working on prevention of radicalization and extremism in 5 countries in the Balkans capturing core impact elements on youth, parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders/community members that is developed by CARE and partners. (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) [52 pages]. Read More...

Covid-19 Digital Response Case Study

The case study captures and documents the process of YMI’s adaptation to the COVID-19 pandemic during the period March-July 2020 in countries in the Balkans (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) and represents a unique contribution and source for other organizations that are going through the same process of adaptation [38 pages]. Read More...

Scaling up Case Study How to Transform a Transformation

Captures the modalities of scaling up of CAREs gender transformative programming in high schools in Balkan countries (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) used by CARE and local partners [33 pages]. Read More...

Taking Care of Our Mountains

On Friday December 11, we celebrated International Mountain Day, which was designated in 2003 by the United Nations to bring attention to the vital importance of conserving mountain ecosystems and the critical environmental services they provide.
To highlight the importance of mountain ecosystems and uplift the voices of women, girls, and other marginalized groups that suffer disproportionately from their destruction, we are sharing a report that outlines some of CARE’s initiatives to protect mountains. Developed in collaboration with and under the leadership of CARE Peru, this report highlights inclusive and innovative solutions for mountain conservation by showcasing three case studies from CARE Peru, CARE Ecuador, and CARE Nepal and examples from CARE Tanzania and CARE Guatemala. [20 pages]. Read More...

Integrated GBV prevention and response in Northeast Nigeria Endline Report

Context The ECHO-GBV prevention and response is an integrated GBV and livelihood project which was implemented as an entry point for CARE Nigeria into GBV-standalone initiatives. The project was funded by European Commission Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) under the supervision of CARE France. The project anticipated to provide direct service to displaced vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys and vulnerable host community members in Bama and Ngala, majority of the project participants were women and girls and indirectly benefits to the larger community. The intervention was anticipated to reach a total of 7,832 project participants. The global objective of the project was to contribute to the protection of the lives of vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys most affected by the crisis in northeastern Nigeria. The specific objective of the project was to enhance the access of newly displaced, vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys to life-saving GBV prevention and response services through coordinated, principled humanitarian support and community-based prevention activities. The project had six expected results:
• R 1. GBV prevention, care, and response services available and accessible to newly displaced individuals and vulnerable host community members at risk of or affected by GBV.
• R 2. Awareness, knowledge, and application of humanitarian principles and SEA prevention and response principles improved among humanitarian actors and security forces.
An end-line study was conducted as a part of the project monitoring and evaluation strategies and framework to review its projects before, during, and after the post-implementation phase. The endline was conducted by CARE Nigeria in August 2020 [31 pages]. Read More...

Dioptra Costing Tool Case Study Jordan

The Syrian crisis that began in 2011 has caused mass internal and external displacement — about 1.3 million Syrians have migrated to Jordan, mostly living in urban areas outside refugee camps (estimated 81%). An assessment by CARE in 2018 found high unmet needs in food security, shelter, protection, education, and livelihoods among Syrian refugees and Jordanian host community members. Many refugee children have missed the crucial years of early education: about 40% of registered school-age Syrian children are out of school and at risk of child labor and early marriage To address these needs, CARE provides comprehensive protection services to vulnerable refugees and Jordanians in Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, Zarqa, and Karak. These services include, but are not limited to, Protection Case Management, Conditional Cash for Education, and Emergency Cash Assistance. [7pages] Read More...

Turkey Case Studies On Syrian Refugees

A collection of case studies about shelter, livelihoods, and protection with Syrian refugees as they tell their stories of getting through their crisis. Read More...

Renewing a Long-Term Strategic Partnership: Lessons learned from 20 years of collaboration in global health and development between CARE and Emory University

Over more than 20 years, CARE USA (CARE) and Emory University (EU) – principally within the Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH) – have collaborated across global health and development sectors, including water and sanitation (WASH), maternal and child nutrition, food security, HIV/AIDS, and women’s empowerment. This collaboration has included joint research projects, training for CARE field staff, student employment and training, guest lectures by CARE staff at Emory, and employment opportunities at CARE for former Emory students following graduation.
Several high-profile joint research projects have included SWASH+ (Kenya: 2006-2019) and the Tipping Point Project (Nepal: 2019-pres). School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene plus Community Impact (SWASH+) was a 13- year project that is an exemplar of the impact of CARE and Emory collaborations. It has resulted in over 20 publications from both institutions, including policy papers that have contributed significantly to increasing the scale, impact, and sustainability of school WASH interventions in Kenya. The Tipping Point project aims to empower adolescent girls and their communities to delay marriage and to promote girls’ rights in Nepal and
Bangladesh.
RSPH researchers commenced a four-year partnership with CARE to strengthen the rigor and visibility of the impacts of this program. These projects have resulted in co-funded grants, peer-reviewed manuscripts, and conference presentations (see Appendix A for a complete list). [21 pages] Read More...

Women’s Economic Empowerment in Protracted Crisis: Syrian Refugee Women in Southeastern Turkey

As Syrian refugee crisis entered its ninth year, the protracted nature of the crisis has become more prominent, with the need of better integration of humanitarian response and development goals. Livelihoods activities with their long-term focus play an important role in humanitarian development nexus. This research is conducted to review and discuss best practices and potential risks for women’s economic empowerment (WEE) projects in protracted crisis in general, and in southeastern Turkey context in particular. The following report should be of interest to any humanitarian organization that conducts livelihoods projects for Syrian refugees in SET region, and that shares the commitment to achieve a more gender-equal society.
In general, women face additional social obstacles to reach economic resources, which span from unpaid care work to gender norms regarding women’s being provider. Majority of Syrian women in Turkey are not actively seeking employment because of their childcare responsibilities, not getting permission to work from either their husband or extended family, care of disable and elderly in the household, and housework. Designing a livelihoods program without considering these additional obstacles women face means that the program is not equally approachable for all genders. Hence, women are the ones left behind as they are the less employable. This research clearly shows that the only way to have a sustainable impact on WEE is to ensure not only women’s economic advancement but also women’s empowerment and gender equality. Read More...

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