Cash Vouchers

Restoring Water Supply System and improved Sanitation and Hygiene Practices in West Mosul, Iraq – Phase III Endline

With funding support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Czech Republic (MoFA Czech), CARE implemented a six-months project aimed at restoring water supply system and improved sanitation and hygiene practices in West Mosul, Iraq. The project is implemented in West Mosul in Al-Zanjili, Al-Ghazlani, Rajam Hadeed and Al-Jadeed neighbourhoods targeting IDPs, host communities and returnees with 47,500 direct beneficiaries. Through the approval of a modification in October 2020 the scope of work was expanded on both the environmental sanitation and water rehabilitation components of the project, increasing the project target population by an additional 25,000 beneficiaries, making the total number of the beneficiaries 72,500.
The endline evaluation seeks to analyze the endline values for key water, hygiene and sanitation project indicators planned in the proposal and to assess the impact and effectiveness the project, relevance and sustainability. The study used a mixed methodology, including a quantitative survey on 560 respondents in Al-Ghazlani (271) and Al-Zanjili neighbourhoods (289), and qualitative interviews with key informants from the neighbourhoods and the stakeholders from the government [27 pages]. Read More...

Emergency Response After Action Review for CARE Ghana’s Response to the 2019 Floods in Upper East Region Final Evaluation

Torrential rains in the Upper East region of Ghana occurred from the 2nd to the 15th of October 2019. The continuous rains led to flooding in all the fifteen (15) administrative districts/municipalities which resulted in the collapse of buildings, deaths and displacement of a sizeable percentage of the population . The most affected districts were; Builsa North, Kassena Nankana Municipal, Bongo, Kassena Nankana West, Builsa South, Tempane and Talensi .
CARE International in Ghana, collaborated with government agencies namely National Disaster Management Organization (NADMO), National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE), Ghana Health Service (GHS) and Information Service Department in the region to respond to the emergency. Key interventions implemented as part of the emergency response were the distribution of food and non-food relief items, cash disbursements, Covid-19 risk communication to victims in four worst affected districts. The districts are; Bongo, Talensi Builsa North and Kassena Nankana Municipal. The relief items included; rice, oil, gari, sugar, Winimix, maize, beans, fish aqua tabs, sanitary pads, buckets bar soap and cloth. Additionally, cash to the tune of GHC 814.00 per flood affected household was disbursed through mobile money system and physical distribution to a total of 700 flood victims across the four districts in three tranches. The cash transfers were meant to enable beneficiaries rebuild after the disaster [12 pages]. Read More...

Restoring Water Supply System and improved Sanitation and Hygiene Practices in West Mosul, Iraq – Phase III Baseline

With funding support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Czech Republic (MoFA Czech), CARE will implement a six - months project aimed at restoring water supply system and improved sanitation and hygiene practices in West Mosul, Iraq. The project will be implemented in West Mosul Zenjele and Ghazlani neighborhoods targeting IDPs, host communities and returnees with 47,500 direct beneficiaries.
The baseline assessment targeted areas identified as high priority by Directorate of water that are in need of rehabilitation and replacement of non-functional parts of water infrastructure. Local authorities are currently overwhelmed by the scale of needs and require support from donors and humanitarian agencies, as a direct contribution to enabling affected populations to have durable solutions through sustainable restoration of services such as water and sanitation. The project will directly support repair of two vital water infrastructure at Ghazlani water treatment plant and Yarmouk booster pumping station in the area of West Mosul while supporting the Municipal Authorities by building their capacity to eventually recover their costs.

The purpose of the Baseline Survey was to obtain a better understanding of the current situation in relation to water supply, sanitation and hygiene amongst the population in the target areas, and establish baseline benchmarks on key project indicators, which will enable the level of success of the project to be measured at the project end. The results of the baseline survey will later be used to evaluate the extent to which the project has met the desired impact post project implementation compared against project endline results.
The baseline assessment assesses:
• Access to safe water and sanitation situation pre-implementation.
• Challenge of solid waste management systems and existence practices.
• Hygiene education sessions on household level
• knowledge, perception, attitude and practice in relation to hygiene, water and sanitation.
[24 pages] Read More...

EDUCATION AND PROTECTION FOR SYRIANS IN JORDAN PROJECT ADA Final Evaluation

The “Education and Protection for Syrians in Jordan'' project has been implemented through CARE International in Jordan and funded by ADA. This project is designed to address the needs of vulnerable Syrians and Jordanian citizens, and targeted four urban areas of Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, and Zarqa. The first objective provided conditional cash for the protection and education of vulnerable youth who are at risk of dropping out or have already dropped out of school due to either working or due to the risk of early/child marriage and, therefore, not attending school. The second objective focused on providing vulnerable families with case-management support, following which referrals were made in order to connect these beneficiaries with both internal and/or external services. In addition, interventions included peer-to-peer support group activities, as well as one-day Psychosocial sessions (PS) implemented at CARE community centers that were focused on recreational, educational, and empowerment activities. The third objective provided small business development training and grants to entrepreneurs hoping to establish or expand their businesses. [19 pages]. Read More...

Dioptra Costing Tool Case Study Jordan

The Syrian crisis that began in 2011 has caused mass internal and external displacement — about 1.3 million Syrians have migrated to Jordan, mostly living in urban areas outside refugee camps (estimated 81%). An assessment by CARE in 2018 found high unmet needs in food security, shelter, protection, education, and livelihoods among Syrian refugees and Jordanian host community members. Many refugee children have missed the crucial years of early education: about 40% of registered school-age Syrian children are out of school and at risk of child labor and early marriage To address these needs, CARE provides comprehensive protection services to vulnerable refugees and Jordanians in Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, Zarqa, and Karak. These services include, but are not limited to, Protection Case Management, Conditional Cash for Education, and Emergency Cash Assistance. [7pages] Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

REDUCIENDO LA VULNERABILIDAD DE LOS MIGRANTES/REFUGIADOS VENEZOLANOS EN PERÚ Informe de sistematización del componente de transferencias monetarias no condicionadas

El proyecto "Reduciendo la Vulnerabilidad de los Migrantes Venezolanos / Refugiados en Perú" se basó en la experiencia exitosa del proyecto piloto Start Fund, que World Vision y Care Perú implementaron previamente, en el cual proporcionaron transferencias de dinero en efectivo no condicionado y multipropósito, para más de 1,125 familias en Tumbes, entregando tarjetas de débito. Con el proyecto se desarrolló una aplicación móvil innovador para inscribir y rastrear a los beneficiarios venezolanos en tránsito que a su vez facilitó la recarga remota de las tarjetas de débito. El proyecto tuvo un gran éxito en la provisión de efectivo a los migrantes con el fin de satisfacer sus necesidades más urgentes, logrando un índice de satisfacción de más del 95% de los beneficiarios.
El proyecto "Reduciendo la Vulnerabilidad de los Migrantes Venezolanos / Refugiados en Perú" desarrolló una estrategia de transferencias de dinero no condicionado con el fin de apoyar a los migrantes en condición de vulnerabilidad y desprotección, el cual funcionó como un mecanismo ágil y eficiente para la gestión de la crisis humanitaria en los migrantes. Siendo el componente de transferencias en efectivo es innovador, Care Perú decidió que se sistematizara la experiencia con el fin de compartirlo con los diseñadores de políticas públicas de protección social y con el Subgrupo en transferencia de efectivo (CBI por sus siglas en inglés) del Grupo de Trabajo para Personas Refugiadas y Migrantes (GTRM) de Perú. Read More...

Unconditional Cash Grant (UCG) Post Distribution Monitoring Report

In response to dire need of women headed household in Kabul whose economy was severely impacted  by the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting continued lockdown, CARE Afghanistan implemented an  emergency response project. Due to the weak health system and limited capacity to deal with major disease outbreaks, communities in different part of country was significantly affected both directly from the COVID-19 and resulting socio-economic impacts. In addition to weak health system, poverty, limited job opportunity, people reliance on daily work, retailing combined with political turmoil putting pressure on the country’s capacity to effectively provide inclusive response and required coordination and response. CARE over three months’ period - officially started in 01st May ending July 31, 2020 implemented an Emergency Response Fund (ERF) project through which provided livelihood cash based response and as well as COVID-19 Health response through scale up existing health project implemented in Kabul. The health response involved provision of hygiene/antiseptic kits to the 1700 most vulnerable HHs and 150 PPE to health center; provision of un-conditional cash grant to the 525 most vulnerable women headed households of Kabul Women Association (KWA) member to help them cover Health and/or livelihoods needs during quarantine period and provision of health and hygiene awareness to the target population most vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreak. Read More...

Applying Behavioral Science to Humanitarian Cash & Voucher Assistance for Better Outcomes for Women in MENA

Ideas42 and CARE International conducted research in three of CARE’s countries of presence—Iraq, Jordan, and Turkey—to develop a thorough understanding of the contexts in which women recipients in these settings receive, make decisions on, and use CVA to support themselves and their households. In the pages that follow, we aim to share behavioral insights that shed new light on the many challenges facing women when using CVA in humanitarian settings in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. In summary, some of the key design principles that can increase the impact of CVA for women include minimizing the mental burdens placed on women throughout the transfer process, priming women to affirm positive identities at key times, making the full range of what CVA can be used for visible, and framing CVA in ways that encourages planning and careful consideration of spending priorities.

Though the guidance is best used during project assessment and design, it can be adapted to different phases in the project cycle. Users are encouraged to ensure that a wider range of specialists participate in discussions seeking to incorporate the guidance—including CVA Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) teams, and sector specialists or technical leads. It can also be used as a point of reflection for evaluation or after-action reviews. In addition, the involvement of program support staff and senior management will be valuable to ensure that the points are actionable and properly resourced. Overall, we hope that this guidance at the least starts a wider conversation on applied behavioral science in the humanitarian space and encourages humanitarian organizations to work to implement behaviorally-informed programs with CVA. Read More...

Gender Implications of Cash Transfers in Malawi

The government of Malawi operates a national safety net program targeting the poorest 10% of the population with unconditional cash transfers and the next poorest 15% with conditional cash transfers through a Cash for Work (CfW) program and vouchers for subsidized agricultural inputs. In 2019 the Government, with support from development partners, has started implementation of an ultra-poor graduation program in nine districts which support ultra-poor households with livelihood grants and complementary services. This safety net is designed to quickly scale to more people or to provide more money to existing participants in case of emergencies.
CARE Malawi set out to identify the gendered implications of this cash programming and how participants’ experiences of cash transfers affected gender equality. To do so, CARE used a combination of literature review and primary data collection with stakeholder consultations, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions (FGDs) at national, district, and community levels. Because of the large-scale cash response to Cyclone Idai in 2019—largely operated through international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)—the study also compared gendered impacts of the government program and NGO humanitarian response. Read More...

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