Child Nutrition

Gender Equity and Women’s Empowerment: The Journey So far; The Experience of the ENSURE Program

The ENSURE Food Security Program is a USAID-funded, five-year intervention designed to profoundly and sustainably impact 215,000 vulnerable and food- insecure Zimbabweans in Manicaland and Masvingo Provinces. The program is a shared commitment by four partners and one service provider—World Vision, CARE, SNV, SAFIRE and ICRISAT—who work together to mainstream gender equity and natural resource management in the three key areas of maternal and child nutrition and health, agricultural production and marketing, and community resilience.

The success of ENSURE can be portrayed through the accounts of thousands of women and men whose lives have been changed through its various programme interventions. Tangible gender transformative changes can be noticed on several dimensions: joint household decision making; reduced violence against women; increased women’s leadership in community leadership; men assisting women with household chores and childcare; women’s ownership of high value productive assets; and increased access and control over income.
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EVALUATION FINALE DU PROJET USAID/NUTRITION – WASH DANS LES REGIONS DE KOULIKORO, SEGOU ET MOPTI

La présente étude vise, en effet, à évaluer l'efficacité de la stratégie nutritionnelle intégrée de l'IRP combinant nutrition, agriculture, eau, assainissement et hygiène (WASH) pour améliorer l'état nutritionnel des femmes enceintes et allaitant et des enfants de moins de 2 ans.

Les principaux indicateurs du projet dans le domaine de la nutrition aussi bien chez les enfants de moins de 2 ans que les femmes en âge de procréer (réduction de la prévalence de l’émaciation, du retard de croissance, de l’émaciation, de l’anémie, amélioration du régime alimentaire minimum acceptable pour les enfants de moins de deux ans et du défit énergétique chronique, de l’anémie et amélioration du régime alimentaire minimum acceptable) ont tous favorablement évolués entre la situation de départ et la situation actuelle. Par contre, aucune valeur de l’indicateur initialement prévu n’a été atteinte par le projet. Il en est de même pour les indicateurs WASH. Cependant, la motivation des bénéficiaires pour soutenir le projet et ses acquis ont été observé. Les bénéficiaires se disent favorables à la poursuivre les activités réalisées après le retrait du projet. Il s’avère nécessaire de poursuivre les activités du projet pour lui permettre d’atteinte des objectifs fixés. Read More...

Kore Lavi Title II Program Haiti – Midterm Evaluation

This reports presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations related to the Kore Lavi mid-term evaluation.

DESCRIPTION OF KORE LAVI. Kore Lavi’s Theory of Change holds that positive and lasting transformation must happen within interrelated domains: (1) where the effective social safety net programming and complementary services reach the most vulnerable populations and protect their access to food while building self-reliance; (2) that achieve breadth and depth in behavior and social change needed to tackle under-nutrition among vulnerable women and children; and (3) that institutionalize accountability, transparency and quality of delivery for mutually reinforcing social protection programs under the leadership of MAST.

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY. The evaluation employed three data collection methodologies: document review, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions.

PRIMARY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS.
At the time of the MTE, Kore Lavi had completed data collection in 16 communes demonstrating the ability to adapt and innovate to address the initial data quality problems that existed at the beginning of the program.

In terms of its implementation on the ground, the food voucher scheme is operating well in identifying voucher recipients and enrolling them in the program, distributing food to beneficiaries via paper or electronic vouchers, recruiting and managing the network of collaborating vendors, enforcing policies governing the scheme and overseeing operations. Food received by beneficiary households from both paper and electronic vouchers is inevitably shared with non-household members, including neighbors and even strangers. The VSLA scheme has effectively provided a mechanism by which large numbers of vulnerable women and men living in program communities can save and access small loans at reasonable interest rates to invest in their businesses or children’s education or for other purposes.

SO3 social behavioral change communications interventions are, on the whole, well designed and well implemented. Care Groups, moreover, appear to be an effective methodology for mobilizing women and communicating critical SBCC messages. Community health agents and Lead Mothers play a critical role in SO3 activities. While they are, for the most part, doing a good job and are satisfied with their roles, they also have a number of legitimate concerns related to the lack of monetary compensation and reimbursement for expenses incurred. The program has done a good job identifying and reaching the targeted women and infants.

Kore Lavi has taken a holistic approach to gender integration from design to implementation and has made a conscious and good faith effort to integrate gender considerations in each of the four program SOs.

Kore Lavi has prioritized information management and has demonstrated a clear institutional interest in improving knowledge and learning.

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Baseline Study of the Title II Development Food Assistance Program in Haiti

In fiscal year 2013, the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded funding to CARE International and its partners, Action Contre La Faim International (ACF) and the U.N. World Food Programme (WFP), to implement a Title II development food assistance program in Haiti.1 The four-year Kore Lavi Program directly supports the Government of Haiti’s (GOH) social protection efforts. The overall objective of the program is to reduce food insecurity and vulnerability by supporting the GOH in establishing a replicable safety net system and expanding capacities for preventing child undernutrition.

KEY FINDINGS.
The Title II program area residents face challenges in all four pillars of food security: (1) availability of food, (2) access to food, (3) utilization of food and (4) stability.

Survey results indicate that 57.5 percent of households suffer from moderate hunger and 13.5 percent of households suffer from severe hunger.

An HDDS of 6.2 indicates that households in the Kore Lavi Program area typically can access and consume 6 of 12 basic food groups. Qualitative data indicate that food consumption is pragmatic at the household level. Individual families eat what is available, what they can grow or what they can afford to purchase. Despite these challenges, many respondents spoke ardently to beliefs about the cultural significance of certain foods, while also holding strong opinions on imported food in comparison to locally produced food.

The household survey data show that 69 percent of all households have an adequate level of food consumption, 22 percent score at the borderline level, and 9 percent score at the poor level.

Across the Kore Lavi Program area, 43.6 percent of households currently live in extreme poverty (less than the international poverty line of USD$1.25 at 2005 prices), with average daily per capita expenditures of constant USD$ 2.10.

The household survey data show that 40 percent of households use an improved drinking water source and 16 percent of households use a non-shared improved sanitation facility.

As measured by body mass index (BMI), the nutritional status of women 15-49 years of age who are not pregnant or two months post-partum is generally satisfactory despite a lack of dietary diversity.

The survey data reveal that 8 percent of children under five years of age in the Kore Lavi Program area show signs of being moderately or severely underweight, and 19 percent of children under five years of age are stunted.

Across the qualitative data, views about gender equality tended to be polarized, rooted historically and in tradition. Read More...

Emergency Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Nutrition for Crisis Affected Communities in East Darfur and South Darfur, Sudan, 2017-2019

The project under evaluation was a two-year project implemented in one locality in South Darfur and three localities in East Darfur during the years 2017 and 2019. The Project was implemented by CIS in partnership with two local organizations and in cooperation with the State institutions.

The intervention activities are tailored to address urgent lifesaving needs of the vulnerable communities through improving communities’ access to WASH facilities and nutrition services. Where, the two components are expected to complement each other and the resultant outcomes are expected to reflect on the improvement of maternal and child health in particular.

The ccomparison of the actual implementation with the planned showed that the types of the activities implemented conform to the planned and that planned outputs are almost completed in accordance with the plan in quantitative and qualitative terms. while the number of beneficiaries reached exceeded the target by about 30%.
As immediate outcomes, IDPs and refugees’ camps expressed improvement in their access to safe drinking water, where 98.6% indicated obtaining water from protected sources. They also revealed satisfaction with availability of water by 65% of the HHs and the water distance has been cut to about 320 m in SD and to 106 m in ED, with an average water distance of 213 meter.

Evident progress has been made along communities’ access to and use of latrines, including women, where, 89.3% and 86.1% of target community members indicated their access to and regular use of latrines. The created hygiene awareness has induced the required positive changes in hygiene and sanitation attitude and practices among communities.

In overall, the treatment of malnutrition reached 80% of the cases and for both girls and boys the cure rate is 75% also for both sexes and the Number of MAM cases treated ranges between 10 to 15 daily, while number of PLW treated ranged between 4 to 7 women daily.

Ultimately, The WASH and nutrition interventions the project delivered so far have addressed emergency humanitarian needs of the IDPs and host communities, without which their lives would have been at great risk. The inadequate unsafe water sources are now more accessible, clean and healthy. The personal hygiene and environment has much improved due to increased awareness and positive change in attitude and practices. VSLAs have added a new livelihood means for women and their families by starting to save and becoming economically active and contributing to households’ budget.
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SECOND TREND SURVEY REPORT 2ND DRAFT MAZIKO PROJECT (NUTRITION FOUNDATIONS FOR MOTHERS AND CHILDREN)

This report presents results of the 2014 second trend survey carried out by CARE Malawi, in March, 2014. The report is the source of information of outcome indicators for children, lactating and pregnant mothers’ wellbeing which include health, nutrition, water and sanitation gender and social empowerment. In addition to presenting values for the specific indicators CARE Malawi values the report because it provides valuable information on the status of its activities on women and children in term of access to basic needs such as food, nutrition and health. The report also reveals the progress made over the two years towards the contribution of MAZIKO to the wellbeing of children and caregivers in Kasungu and Dowa. [127 pages] Read More...

FINAL REPORT ENDLINE SURVEY: WARUNG ANAK SEHAT (WAS) PROGRAM

The WAS program scheme is originally conceptualized in 2011 by a national food company with a non-government organization as the local partner. Since 2016, CARE is responsible as the local partner for the initiation or continuation of Warung Anak Sehat in 350 schools across 4 different locations in Indonesia. In several areas, Warung Anak Sehat was first initiated by other organization and then continued by CARE. The WAS scheme consists of establishment of food kiosks which provides healthy food inside or outside schools. These kiosks are set up and run by vendors (usually female) who are provided with skills, tools and equipment. [27 pages] Read More...

Home-based ECD parent education and support program: Impact Evaluation Short Report

The CARE ECD program has been operational in the two districts of Funhalouro and Homoine in Inhambane Province since 2013. The program is focused around once-a-week, home visits to vulnerable families by volunteers. This report outlines the results of the impact evaluation (using a control study and qualitative and quantitative data and conducted between 2014 and 2016). The results prove conclusively that impact has been made on caregiver status, child status and the caregiving environment – the pillars of ECD as identified by the Essential Package. The program was funded by The Hilton Foundation. [32 pages] Read More...

ECD Program Impact Evaluation Report

The long-term impact aim of the program was to improve comprehensive developmental outcomes, as defined by the Essential Package, for children under five years of age. The aim of the research into the program was to evaluate program impact through nested quantitative and qualitative studies with the ultimate objectives of: i) Assessing whether the ECD program improved child development and nutritional outcomes and, if improvements did occur, ii) Determining which program components contributed significantly to that impact in the different environments. These components included nutrition, social accountability and ECD interventions. The CARE ECD program was funded by the Hilton Foundation from 2013 to 2016. [106 pages] Read More...

Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement through Market Expansion (PRIME) Endline Survey Report

Beginning in 2012, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) launched a 5-year project, named the Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement through Market Expansion (PRIME), to increase vulnerable communities’ resilience to climate change and reduce hunger and poverty. This endline report presents findings on whether PRIME achieved its overall objective in the Afar, Oromiya and Somali woredas where it was implemented. It also recommends further investigations prior to developing additional interventions (e.g. PRIME Phase Two), and considerations for defining any future monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan. [64 pages] Read More...

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