Climate Change

Cyclone Idai Response and Recovery Project in Manicaland Province: Final Evaluation Report

CARE International in Zimbabwe and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) Consortium implemented an ECHO funded project in Chipinge and Chimanimani districts. The consortium implemented early recovery interventions, seeking to address the immediate WASH and basic needs of the Cyclone Idai affected populations. The interventions were centered on a community-based integrated approach focusing on building local capacities and empowering communities to regain control over their lives and become more resilient using a robust cash-based component. The project is targeting a total of 9 wards in Chimanimani and Chipinge districts. The project also implemented integrated WASH support interventions in 2 wards in Chipinge district and 1 ward in Chimanimani district whilst implementing the Multi-Purpose Cash Transfer project in 4 wards in Chimanimani district.

The eleven-month project (1 May 2019 to 30 March 2020) aimed to respond to the urgent needs of vulnerable populations through integrated WASH, food security and livelihoods assistance. The overall objective of the project is to provide immediate access to integrated WASH and food security and livelihoods support to the cyclone-affected population.

The consortium conducted an internal final evaluation survey in ward 1 & 4 of Chipinge district and wards 10, 13, 14, 16, 17 & 21 of Chimanimani district for all the interventions to facilitate evidence-based monitoring and evaluation as well as to match targets with the expected project outcomes. The results will be used to draw lessons learnt for future programming. This survey adopted a quantitative and qualitative methodology. A survey questionnaire with close ended questions administered through KoBo collect. Qualitatively, Focus group Discussions with project beneficiaries and Key Informant interviews were sources of data for this assignment. A review of project documents was also done in assessing the intervention. In selecting project beneficiaries to engage in the end line survey, proportional stratified random sampling was employed.

Acknowledgements
The compilation of the project evaluation report was made possible by individuals who dedicated their valuable time. Sincere gratitude to the CARE International and International Rescue Committee (IRC) project staff for their tireless efforts throughout the course of the evaluation. Appreciation goes to the recruited enumerators who participated actively in the collection and processing of the survey data. Special mention also goes to the project staff and managers for the administrative and logistical support during the exercise. The respondents (Cyclone Response and Recovery Project beneficiaries) in Chipinge and Chimanimani are specially thanked for their participation as units of analysis for the evaluation, without them the exercise would not have been possible. Special mention also goes to the CARE & IRC Monitoring and Evaluation unit for analysis and report writing. Read More...

A POLICY BRIEF FOR REDUCING CLIMATE RISKS AND VULNERABILITY FOR THE WOMEN, GIRLS AND SMALL HOLDER FARMERS AMONG PASTORALIST COMMUNITIES

Investments especially mining in pastoral areas across the Horn of Africa countries, while important for national development entails serious environmental impacts and pose climate risks that increases the vulnerability of marginalized groups of people who are already disadvantaged by the semi-arid topography. The women, girls, youth, and smallholder
farmers are particularly affected given that their fragile livelihoods are nature based.

The current regional initiatives aimed at building resilience of the affected communities have not adequately addressed the linkage between livelihood systems and sustainable environment management. The initiatives at national and regional levels tend to use traditional orthodox approaches of “environmental conservation” as sacrosanct for addressing all climate risks.

It is critical that any initiatives to reduce the vulnerability caused by the investments must consider that providing decent livelihoods for the most vulnerable groups is the key to achieving an environment conducive for investment. The interventions proposed in this brief, if well implemented, will address this issue; providing sustainable livelihoods while promoting economic investment. Read More...

STRENGTHENING RESILIENCE AND PROMOTING INCLUSIVE GOVERNANCE PROGRAM (STRENPO): Experiences of advocacy and action for climate change resilience

Care International in Uganda presents to you experiences and lessons learnt while implementing Strengthening Resilience and Promoting Inclusive Governance for Women and Youth in Vulnerable Communities Project (STRENPO). At Care we are using the nexus of humanitarian and long-term development to build resilience that bridges humanitarian action and sustainable development. Our approach to increasing resilience operates in synergy with gender transformation and inclusive governance.

We also show the models used to empower citizens such as engaging duty bearers, building civil society organizational capacity to engage with the duty bearers and claim citizens’ rights and provide information to citizens, build organization legitimacy and support multi-stakeholder platforms for engagement and informing policy processes. Read More...

Where the Rain Falls Phase III (2017 – 2019): Final Evaluation Report

In 2009, the Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) initiative started as a three-year research project investigating the impact of rainfall variability on food and livelihood security, and migration.

This research culminated in a global policy report (2012) and the development of more action-oriented community-based adaptation (CBA) pilot projects in each India, Thailand and Bangladesh. A second phase (2014 – 2016), and later a third phase (2017 – 2019), aimed to scale results, impacts and lessons learned to date for broader support for, and uptake of, CBA methods and approaches.

In October 2019, CARE France engaged an International Consultant to lead WtRF’ first multi-county evaluation. As per the Terms of Reference (TORs) for this evaluation (see Annex IV) the main objectives of the evaluation are two-fold:
(i) to assess the degree of achievement of the WtRF global and specific objectives in India and Thailand respectively; and
(ii) to extract common and/or comparable lessons learned about factors contributing to and hindering achievements (e.g. barriers and enablers) Read More...

Informe Final de Evaluación Proyecto Nutriendo el Futuro Fase II

El Proyecto Nutriendo el Futuro Fase II se ejecutó en el marco de la alianza CARE y Cargill, en apoyo a cuatro países del área centroamericana: Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua y Costa Rica.
Su objetivo fue contribuir a que los productores/as y microempresarios/as de las áreas rurales y periurbanas del área de influencia de Cargill mejoraran la calidad de vida de sus familias, garantizando su seguridad alimentaria y el manejo sostenible de sus recursos naturales. El mismo se implementó por un período de 36 meses, entre septiembre de 2016 y agosto de 2019. El Proyecto brindó apoyo directo a un total de 84 comunidades, 1,606 pequeños productores/as, 968 microempresarios/as y 25,968 niños y niñas en edad escolar. Más del 50% de los beneficiarios (12,863) fueron mujeres y niñas. Read More...

ROM Review: Initiative REVANCHE: Résilience et Adaptation aux Variabilités Climatiques, pour une Sécurité Alimentaire et Nutritionnelle Durable au Tchad, Régions de Wadi Fira, Guera et Ouadaï.

PERTINENCE. La mise en oeuvre de l’action REVANCHE a confirmé la pertinence de la stratégie PRO-ACT Résilience qui a été à l’origine de sa conception et du choix du mode d’exécution du projet permettant la sortie de l’urgence et l’ancrage d’un développement durable au sein des communautés cible. Les réponses proposées sont appropriées pour satisfaire les besoins des bénéficiaires et soutiennent la Plan nationale de renforcement de la résilience des populations tchadiennes. La pertinence est maintenue tout au long de l’exécution car le projet répond aux besoins des plus vulnérables par des actions à effets immédiats par du cash qui permet l’accès
à l’alimentation et aux soins de santé.

EFFICIENCE. La mise en oeuvre s’est révélée efficiente et propice à une bonne progression vers la réalisation des résultats recherchés. Le projet a connu un retard dans son démarrage mais dont les causes relèvent, pour la plupart d’entre elles, de facteurs externes au projet lui-même.

EFFICACITÉ. Le projet a été efficace à livrer la majeure partie des produits planifiés, notamment ceux consistant en travaux et réalisations d’ouvrages physiques et en appuis méthodologiques et logistiques aux parties étatiques et ONG partenaires.

DURABILITÉ. La problématique de la durabilité se pose encore en termes de capacité des communautés à s’approprier les apports du projet. Quatre ONG nationales ont pris part à l’exécution du projet REVANCHE et ont bénéficié d’un paquet de formations et du coaching progressif de CARE et OXFAM. Mais les organisations communautaires de base (organisations paysannes, groupements féminins, artisans réparateurs de pompes, groupe pour le système d’alerte précoce, GIE d’ouvriers maçons, …) qui constituent le socle de la stratégie de durabilité de l’action sont encore à un stade embryonnaire et requièrent des appuis et une mise en réseau entre eux et avec les services publiques Read More...

Mid-Term Strategic Review of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity

CARE commissioned a Mid-Term Strategic Review (MTSR) of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity to formulate recommendations for the remaining life of the project to increase effectiveness in achieving sustainable impact. The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is being implemented in 27 Woredas in the three regions of Tigray, Amhara, and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples and is just over the midway point in its five-year life from December 5, 2016, through December 3, 2021. The purpose of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is to reduce food insecurity and increase resilience for 97,900 chronically food insecure households that are enrolled in the fourth cycle of the Government of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP4), enabling them to graduate with resilience from the PSNP4.

The MTSR for the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity was a formative evaluation exercise intended to provide guidance on ways to improve the effectiveness of the program in achieving intended impact.

Relative to the four global learning questions for the MTSR (see page 4), the MTSR found that the model that the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is implementing is effective for achieving graduation with resilience, but because frontline delivery is constrained by the number of staff, their technical capacities and the degree of supervision and support that they receive, interventions are not always going deeply enough to ensure behavioral change. The program is empowering women both economically and socially through the VESA platform, but there are significant variations between regions; and outside of the VESA, there is some evidence to suggest that women’s empowerment has not yet been well incorporated, especially in value chain participation and MFI linkages. Progress is certainly being made in transferring ideas and knowledge to PSNP counterparts, but that has not yet translated into practice mainly because of resource constraints. Key approaches that need to be added or strengthened in the coming two years include expanding frontline delivery capacities, expanding efforts to ensure that strategies and approaches are well understood by implementation staff at all levels in all partners, ensuring that women’s empowerment is included in all approaches by all partners, and looking for new ways to facilitate access to jobs, either through self-employment or wage employment, for youth from PSNP households.

The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is already doing some very nice work in starting to achieve sustainable impact. The project has strong potential to be recognized as a “great” project if it can make some adjustments.
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Promoting Resilient Livelihoods in Borana (RESET II) – Midterm

RESET II project, which began in October 2016, has been implemented for 42 months with a total budget Euro 6,586,291 and is financed by European Commission through European Union Trust Fund (EUTF). Implemented through a multi stakeholders consortium which included CARE Ethiopia, Oromo Self Help Organization (OSHO) and Action Against Hunger (AAH), the project was designed to address root causes of displacement and irregular migration in Arero, Miyo, Dire, Moyale, Dillo and Dhas Woredas within the Borena Zone, Oromia region. With the overall aim of enhancing the resilience of over 100,000 PSNP and other vulnerable communities, of which over 70,000 are women covering 21,000 households in total, the project results framework consists of five outcomes i.e. improved access and coverage of health and nutrition, diversified and increased livelihood opportunities and incomes, improved Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) capacity, enhanced research and knowledge management systems and reduced barriers to women empowerment. In order to achieve the above aim, the project partners employed CARE’s Pastoralist Resilience Casual Model (PRCM) using proven CARE’S Village Saving and Loan Association (VSLA), Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (CVCA), Social Analysis and Action (SAA), Participatory Scenario Planning (PSP) and AAH’s as well as Assisting Behavior change (ABC) methods and approaches throughout the project implementation.

The main purpose of this evaluation is to assess the progress, achievements, constraints and lessons learnt from the implementation of the project and to produce sufficient evidence that would help achieve the project overall objective. With that in mind, while the primary audiences for the evaluation are the consortium partners and the European Union, the secondary audience could also include relevant sector government offices and other Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) implementing similar projects as lessons learned here may guide similar programming. Read More...

CARE – FANRAPAN Post-Project Evaluation of Climate Resilient Agriculture Practices

CARE and FANRPAN share common approaches to sustainable economic and social development. We jointly recognize the challenges to inclusive agricultural development in Africa. We also recognize the importance of agriculture research, policy advocacy and capacity strengthening, all of which are needed to improve agricultural production and productivity. This study is an integral part of these shared objectives and is a collaborative effort of the CARE and FANRPAN teams in Mozambique.

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Final Project Evaluation Northern Uplands – Promoting Climate Resilience

The Northern Uplands - Promoting Climate Resilience (NU-PCR) is implemented by CARE International in Lao PDR in partnership with the Comité de Coopération avec le Laos (CCL) and the Sustainable Agriculture and Environment Development Association (SAEDA). The project, funded by the European Union (EU), CARE Denmark, and OXFAM (OHK), is designed to improve the resilience of local ethic communities in Phongsaly to the impacts of climate change and to strengthen the capacity of government authorities and local ethnic communities. The objective of the project is to enable improved resilience of remote ethnic upland communities, in particular women, to the impact of climate variability and change, and contribute to the achievement of MDGs 1, 3, and 7. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the project’s success in implementing activities and in attaining the project’s goals and expected results.

NU-PCR has implemented a wide variety of activities to increase the resilience of ethnic communities to climate change and climate variability. The project has been successful in achieving its objectives and expected results. Improvements in households’ resilience to climate change have been validated from results of the end-line study in comparison to baseline values. Project support for cardamom and tea production; intercropping galangal, pineapple, and fruit trees; piloting rattan, bee keeping, and soybeans; vegetable gardening; improved rice production; mushroom production; fishponds; and support to women’s savings and loans groups has resulted in reducing the impact of climatic hazards and improving villagers’ incomes.
(69 pages) Read More...

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