COVID 19

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Global Trends June 2020

In the three months since CARE released its first Rapid Gender Analysis of COVID-19, the situation has evolved quickly and spread globally. CARE has continued to closely monitor this situation, by conducting context-specific analyses in 5 regions covering 64 countries. This has included conversations and data collection with more than 4,500 women.
This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis. It also reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls—and for men and boys—as the crisis deepens. Our recent research reveals:
• The highest immediate priorities 3 months into the crisis are food, income, and rights—including concerns around Gender Based Violence, caregiving burdens, and mobility. Women and girls show these needs most acutely, but they also rise to the top of men and boys’ priorities in COVID-19.
• Women’s burdens are increasing. As frontline workers in the health system, as survivors of Gender Based Violence, as the people primarily responsible for food, cleaning, and childcare—especially with schools closed, women confirm that their burdens are rising, and so is the stress around them.
• Women are displaying remarkable leadership, but are still unable to access most decision-making, around COVID-19 and around daily life. They are also quickly approaching the end of their safety nets.
In this context, this document provides updated recommendations to focus on lessening the immediate impact on women and providing the chance to build back equal. These recommendations cluster around:
• Urgently addressing top priorities of food, income, and rights by expanding safety nets—both in the immediate response and in long-term ways for all people to provide their own food and livelihoods.
• Reducing women’s burdens by providing extra support for caregiving, services for GBV prevention and response, and investing in women healthcare workers.
• Prioritizing women’s leadership by creating space for women leaders at all levels of the response, and consistently listening to women’s perspectives and data as the crisis evolves.
Read More...

Indonesia Rapid Gender Assessment in Response to COVID-19

Following the first reported COVID-19 case in Indonesia, Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) had immediately started to prepare its response package to support communities in areas where it operates. Given the mobility restriction, it had been quite challenging to prepare the response package particularly in preceding the response with much more detailed field-based needs assessment. This Rapid Gender Assessment (RGA) was prepared almost simultaneously with the delivery of the first stage of the response. While it has been limited in its use for the first stage response, it is intended to guide YCP’s next stage of response which will be aimed at mitigating the social economic impact of COVID-19, emphasizing the needs of women and access to the support. This RGA will serve as the basis for further in-depth study or assessment to support detailed design of the support schemes and other assessments that other development partners are planning to undertake.
Information on the local situation and needs were gathered from the projects’ database and information from the local governments and partners. Therefore, the first stage of YCP’s response consist of preventive and protective measures from the virus transmission which was aimed at the communities in general.
Specifically, the RGA has the following objectives:
1. To analyze the impact of COVID-19 and the needs of the communities especially the vulnerable groups such as women and children, the elderlies, people with disabilities and other vulnerabilities;
2. To inform the design of COVID-19 response based on the identified needs of the different groups, focusing on: (i) paid and unpaid productive works; (ii) gender relations and decision-making process; (iii) basic services; (iv) safety and security with respect to gender-based violence; (v) influence of faith and religion; (vi) access to information and technology; (vii) WASH and livelihood; and (viii) child protection and education. Read More...

Iraq COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of June 2020, Iraq is experiencing drastic increase in the number of people who contracted COVID-19 compared to the preceding months. With the everchanging context of COVID-19, women, girls, men and boys in Iraq have been affected differently; and they developed different coping mechanisms. Furthermore, their roles within households have been directly impacted by the crisis, and their participation and access to services also have reflected the gendered dynamics of the COVID-19. There has been an increase in the protection and gender-based violence risks identified and reported, and women and girls are disproportionately affected by these risks. Read More...

Vietnam Rapid Gender Analysis May 2020

Vietnam reported its first known case of COVID-19 on 23 January 2020. As of 19 May, the country had 324 confirmed cases, with 263 recoveries and no deaths.
In Vietnam, COVID-19 presents a range of contextual challenges including high numbers of migrant workers, high numbers of employees in the garment industry, many people working in the informal sector, and linguistically and culturally diverse ethnic minorities. The impacts of COVID-19 on vulnerable groups, such as migrant workers, informal workers, garment factory workers, and ethnic minorities are further marginalising these groups, exacerbating poverty and inequality and increasing their exposure to other social, economic and protection risks.
Women in Vietnam have historically been underrepresented in public decision-making processes, a trend that is reflected in high-level decision-making structures on COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their country should respond to it. Read More...

Myanmar COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis version 1

As of 7 June 2020, there have been 228 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Myanmar,1 and new cases continue to be confirmed.2 Myanmar’s humanitarian and conflict dynamics, high poverty rate, flow of returning migrants, high numbers of internally displaced people and urban slum-dwellers, and high proportion of workers in the informal sector present a range of challenges in the context of COVID-19. These factors tend to make prevention and control measures more difficult, while also intensifying the potential impacts of a larger outbreak, if it were to occur.
Despite the relatively low number of verified cases within its borders to date, the pandemic has already had an outsized economic impact in Myanmar. Migrant workers, informal sector workers including sex workers, and garment sector workers have all been disproportionately affected. Women in Myanmar have traditionally been under-represented in public decision-making processes, a trend which is continuing in structures established to respond to COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their communities and country respond to it, increasing the risk of a COVID-19 response that does not adequately address the needs and priorities of the most vulnerable women and girls. Read More...

Impact Socio-Economique du COVID-19 chez les Jeunes au Niger

Le COVID-19 est une maladie infectieuse découverte à Wuhan (Chine) en décembre 2019. Elle est transmise principalement d’une personne à une autre par le biais de gouttelettes respiratoires expulsées par le nez ou par la bouche lorsqu’une personne malade tousse, éternue ou parle.

Le Niger ne fait pas exception des pays épargnés par le COVID-19. A cet effet, le Gouvernement s’est active à mettre en place avec l’appui des partenaires techniques et financiers des mesures pour lutter contre le virus . Ces mesures ont permis un contrôle efficace de la maladie. Parmi celle-ci, on peut citer la suspension ou limitation des passagers pour les transports en communs, le couvre-feu, l’isolement de la ville de Niamey etc.

Ces mesures bouleversent malheureusement tous les secteurs économiques. Selon le rapport publié par Dispositif National de Prévention et de Gestion des Crises Alimentaires, ces mesures auront un impact sur les dépenses des ménages:
• La mise en quarantaine et le couvre-feu pourraient augmenter de 30% les dépenses liées
à l’alimentation (hausse des prix) ;
• La réduction du temps de travail, la présence des enfants à la maison pourront occasionner
une augmentation de 10% des dépenses d’énergie et d’eau de 30% dans les centres urbains
• L’interdiction des cérémonies sociales (mariage, baptême, funérailles) pourrait faire baisser les dépense y afférentes de 30% dans les villes chef-lieu des régions et de 50%
dans celle de Niamey ;
• Les dépenses liées à la communication pourraient augmenter de 50% à Niamey et 20%
dans les autres centres urbains à cause du confinement (saturation des réseaux);

Les dépenses des ménages liées principalement à l’hygiène corporelle et équipements sanitaires pourront augmenter de 50% en milieu urbain et 10% en milieu rural.

C’est dans ce cadre que Youth Tea, un laboratoire pilote initié par CARE International au Niger a décidé de conduire une analyse sur l’impact socio-économique du coronavirus sur les jeunes filles et garçons en milieu urbain et rural (Communes de Niamey et de Bermo). Read More...

Latin America and the Caribbean rapid gender analysis for COVID-19

Women and girls across Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) are facing a terrifying mix of increased domestic violence and care burden, as well as a lower access to income and jobs, and potential social unrest as a result of the coronavirus outbreaks.

The LAC region has the highest levels of inequality in the world, with wide gaps in living standards across countries, regions, sectors, and socioeconomic spheres. When coupled with the pervasive gender inequality that persists, the response to Covid-19 in LAC becomes immeasurably more complicated. CARE International and UN Women joined forces in Latin America, and the Caribbean on this report which presents a series of recommendations aimed at ensuring a more effective gender-inclusive response in the region. The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) for COVID-19 is a tool designed to provide information about the different needs, risks, capacities, and coping strategies of women, men, boys, girls, and gender-diverse people during the COVID-19 crisis. This RGA is part of the iterative RGA process for the LAC region and is intended as a programming tool for humanitarian actors. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis CARE Morocco (English, French)

This analysis is based on a qualitative survey carried out in the field with the various beneficiaries of CARE Morocco's projects. A questionnaire was developed for the occasion and completed through phone calls by the field teams in different intervention areas of CIM. It should be noted that the survey did not focus on a large number of respondents, but rather on qualitative responses with the leaders of CARE Morocco beneficiary groups such as Village Savings and Loans Associations, cooperatives, educators from the education sector, and other partner associations at the local level. Secondary data were also drawn from various national reports and studies, in particular those conducted by the High Commission for Planning and the National Observatory for Human Development. Read More...

Analyse Rapide Genre pour COVID-19 Cameroun Mai 2020

Les effets nuisibles induits de cette pandemie affectent plusieurs secteurs et touchent différemment les filles, les garçons, les femmes et les hommes.Ces effets sont perceptibles sur le plan psychologique, sanitaire, economique et social. Globalement, les popluations les plus impactées sont les ménages pauvres en milieu urbain dépendant du secteur informel. Du fait de leur rôle d’encadrement et de soins à la famille, les femmes et les filles sont fortement impliquées dans la sphère sanitaire. Nombre d’entre elles sont sages-femmes, infirmières, aides-soignantes ou agentes de santé communautaires, des rôles qui les placent en première ligne et les exposent à la pandémie. La fermeture des écoles augmente la charge du travail domestique, qui leur incombe habituellement ; les restrictions des déplacements affectent les secteurs des services et du travail informel, dans lesquels elles constituent la majorité de la main-d’oeuvre ; et les tensions qui les accompagnent a aussi augmenté les violences conjugales et d’autres formes de violence basée sur le genre.
Bien que les femmes et les filles soient les plus impactées par cette pandémie au Cameroun, leur manque de leadership leur faible implication dans les sphères de prise de décision au niveau du ménage et dans la communauté fait en sorte qu’elles sont quasiment exclus des comités de gestion de crise. Read More...

Uganda COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

The novel corona virus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic has been widely reported to have distinct gendered implications in countries around the world.1 This rapid gender analysis (RGA) seeks to explore the implications of COVID 19 in specific areas in northern Uganda to inform current CARE Uganda programming in the region, as well as to serve as reference to any other stakeholders working in the area and with similar target groups. The specific locations this RGA covers are: Omugo settlement, Palabek
settlement, Gulu municipality, Arua municipality, Moyo district and Lamwo district.

This study looks at how COVID 19 is affecting men, women, boys and girls, from refugee and non-refugee backgrounds, in the urban, rural and settlement contexts. It follows earlier RGAs2 conducted prior to the outbreak of the pandemic and seeks to identify where there have been changes of note as a result of the pandemic. On this basis, it provides a number of recommendations to donors and for implementing organisations. Read More...

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