COVID 19

Community Health Needs Assessment – Where Health Services Are Not Accessible in “White Areas” of Ghazni, Paktya and Khost provinces

Between 15-25 December 2019, CARE Afghanistan carried out Rapid Needs Assessments (RNA) in selected communities in Ghazni, Paktya, and Khost provinces, with specific focus on communities in congested areas where conflict-affected populations reside – specifically AOG controlled areas with lack of government or NGOs providing services, including health services.

The aim of the assessment was to assess the condition of needs, vulnerabilities and access issues – both for the population and for CARE - in the selected communities within mentioned provinces to help inform a proposal to ECHO for health and some integrated GBV and nutrition interventions.

Results of the rapid assessment in the confirmed an ongoing lack of access to basic services (with acute gaps in access to trauma care services, SRH and GBV services). Given chronic conflict, lack of humanitarian assistance, poor outlook for the population and lack of available basic services, all those interviewed emphasized a strong need to meet their basic humanitarian needs, more particularly, the existing need for health response. Both respondents and local authorities also identified health and trauma care support as priority assistance, and emphasized its criticality because of remoteness and very long distance from nearest health facilities. Read More...

Pacific COVID 19 RGA March 26 2020

Novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is having devastating impacts globally. As of 26th March, 414,179 confirmed cases and 18,440 deaths have been recorded across 178 countries. To date, the Pacific has confirmed cases in Guam, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Fiji, PNG, and suspected cases in Samoa. In most Pacific countries, access to quality health services including intensive care is limited. Food security and livelihoods are particularly vulnerable to shocks due to semi subsistence lifestyles and a high reliance on the informal sector for income.

A COVID-19 outbreak in the Pacific could disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways including adverse impacts to their education, food security and nutrition, health, livelihoods, and protection. Women are the primary care givers in the family and are key health care front line responders placing them at increased risk and exposure to infection. Maternal and sexual reproductive health needs continue in an emergency but risk being de-prioritized. COVID-19 risks increasing women’s workloads, caring for children as schools close and the sick. Additionally, there is a risk of increased family violence in a region where pre-existing rates of violence against women are already very high.

Men's gender roles and norms need to be taken into account in order to ensure that men are properly targeted to help reduce their vulnerability to illness and to leverage their roles as leaders and decision makers in the home and in the community to help prevent the spread of the disease. Read More...

Australia COVID19 RGA April 1 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a healthcare crisis but is having far-reaching impacts on the economy and the social fabric of countries. Australia is no different. While the proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, various groups are impacted differently. Women and people with disabilities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who have poorer health outcomes are at a higher risk of infection. Barriers in accessing information and medical and other health services exacerbate this higher risk. Women make up almost 80 per cent of the health and social assistance industry, and this means more women than men will be on the frontline of the response to COVID-19, putting them at higher risk of exposure.
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the Australian economy, with the Australian Government estimating one million people could be made unemployed. The impact on the economy is compounded by the destruction of local businesses and homes during the recent bushfire season. Four-fifths of employed Australians (80 per cent) work in industries providing services, such as health care, education, and retail. These sectors are the hardest hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19. Many part-time and casual workers, of which women comprise the majority, are most likely to be laid off or given shorter hours during the crisis and post-crisis. Unpaid caring labour falls more heavily on women because of the existing structure of the workforce and gendered social norms. Women are paid less and perceived to have more flexibility from doing casual or part-time jobs. As a result, women will be expected to undertake unpaid care work. Read More...

COVID Needs Assessment Urban Areas and Azraq Camp

The overall aim of this rapid needs assessment is to better understand the impact of both COVID-19 and the containment measures and restrictions implemented by the Government of Jordan on CARE Jordan’s beneficiaries, which include the elderly, pregnant and lactating women, people with disabilities (PwDs) and households with serious health risks and needs. Read More...

Global COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis April 1

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation classified COVID-19 as a pandemic.1 Disease outbreaks affect women, girls, men, boys, and persons of all genders differently, to say nothing of the wide variety of at-risk and marginalised groups. The compounding complexities of development and humanitarian contexts can have disproportionate effects on women and girls, as well as those at-risk and vulnerable groups. CARE International identified the need to highlight the gender and intersectional impacts of the COVID-19 crisis.
To achieve this, CARE first developed a policy brief to review lessons learned from previous public health emergencies. CARE then adapted its Rapid Gender Analysis toolkit to develop the Global Rapid Gender Analysis on COVID-19, conducted in consultation with the International Rescue Committee (IRC). This report is for humanitarians working in fragile contexts that are likely to be affected by the COVID-19 crisis. It is organised around broad themes and areas of focus of particular importance to those whose programming advances gender equality and reduces gender inequalities. It seeks to deepen the current gender analysis available by encompassing learning from global gender data available for the COVID-19 public health emergency. Read More...

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