rapid needs assessment

A Glimpse on Poor and Extreme Poor Pregnant and Lactating Women’s Situation in Sunamganj, amidst COVID-19

The global pandemic COVID19 outbreak has crippled the economy after the nationwide lockdown imposed by the Bangladesh government since the end of March 2020 and has thrown millions of its population into poverty and food insecurity. Sunamganj, district is highly susceptible to natural hazards such as heavy rain, storm, thunderstorm, flash flood, which severely affect their livelihood and food and nutrition security where the COVID19 crisis has speeded up the devastation of daily livelihood. While writing this report the total number of infected corona patients in Sunamganj was 1162 and nine died. To better understand how pregnant and lactating women in the poor and the extremely poor household of Sunamganj district, are experiencing and adapting during this COVID 19 crisis, Collective Impact for Nutrition (CI4N), CARE Bangladesh conducted a rapid mobile-based survey from May 14 to 23, 2020. This report represents unofficial survey findings to keep a finger on the pulse of the food and nutrition security situation in rural Bangladesh. Read More...

Community Health Needs Assessment – Where Health Services Are Not Accessible in “White Areas” of Ghazni, Paktya and Khost provinces

Between 15-25 December 2019, CARE Afghanistan carried out Rapid Needs Assessments (RNA) in selected communities in Ghazni, Paktya, and Khost provinces, with specific focus on communities in congested areas where conflict-affected populations reside – specifically AOG controlled areas with lack of government or NGOs providing services, including health services.

The aim of the assessment was to assess the condition of needs, vulnerabilities and access issues – both for the population and for CARE - in the selected communities within mentioned provinces to help inform a proposal to ECHO for health and some integrated GBV and nutrition interventions.

Results of the rapid assessment in the confirmed an ongoing lack of access to basic services (with acute gaps in access to trauma care services, SRH and GBV services). Given chronic conflict, lack of humanitarian assistance, poor outlook for the population and lack of available basic services, all those interviewed emphasized a strong need to meet their basic humanitarian needs, more particularly, the existing need for health response. Both respondents and local authorities also identified health and trauma care support as priority assistance, and emphasized its criticality because of remoteness and very long distance from nearest health facilities. Read More...

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