refugees

AN INTERSECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF GENDER AMONGST ROHINGYA REFUGEES AND HOST COMMUNITIES IN COX’S BAZAR

The Rohingya ethnic minority population in Myanmar have been persecuted over generations and are denied of their fundamental human rights. Violence, discrimination and persecution in Myanmar have eventually led the stateless Rohingya people to flee
to Bangladesh from Rakhine State in successive waves over the last four decades. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, reaching the total number of 914,998 people and constituting the largest refugee camp
in the world. The rapid and sizable influx of Rohingya refugees now outnumbers locals nearly three to one in the two sub-districts, Ukhiya and Teknaf, where refugees and the subsequent humanitarian response have had an impact on the host community.
This inter-agency research is commissioned by ActionAid in collaboration with UNHCR and CARE Bangladesh to investigate how age, gender and diversity issues are addressed in the humanitarian response amongst Rohingya refugees and the host communities. The
quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 03 December 2019 to 07 January 2020. This transdisciplinary research aims to fill a significant gap by providing a critical analysis of the present status of gender relations addressed in humanitarian response, taking into consideration the intersectionality among specific needs based on age, gender and other diversity factors contributing to a person or group’s vulnerability.
This study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the change in context, it has now become even more imperative to adapt existing mechanisms within the ongoing response, especially the need for increased Age, Gender and Diversity (AGD) analysis and monitoring of vulnerabilities. While COVID-19 was not a factor in this report, the recommendations of this report need to be addressed and implemented with the changing context in mind. Read More...

IN THE SHADOWS OF THE PANDEMIC: THE GENDERED IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON ROHINGYA AND HOST COMMUNITIES

Since the onset of global COVID-19 pandemic in December, Bangladesh has been in a state of high alert. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Bangladesh was recorded on 8 March 2020. By 26 March, containment measures were implemented, impacting an already vulnerable population. As of 13 September there have been 337,520 total cases, with 4,401 in Cox’s Bazar and 179 across all 34 refugee camps. However, it is highly likely that these low case numbers are more indicative of negligible testing than of the actual
spread of the virus; the true incidence of the disease is unknown. COVID-19 and the accompanying containment measures have had a significant impact on women, girls, men and boys, including female sex workers, transgender persons and people with disabilities,
across all camps, exacerbating existing conditions, such as overcrowding, movement across hilly terrain, uneven access to a limited number of WASH and health facilities and inadequate access to protection and hygiene resources. This has hindered the ability of refugees to take the necessary preventive measures to limit infections. The host community faces similar difficulties, and, moreover, the containment measures had an adverse economic impact on both host and refugee communities.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) builds on the secondary data analysis done in May 2020 by the Gender Hub, UN Women, CARE and OXFAM. This RGA aims to answer the following research questions:
􀁹 How has COVID-19 impacted women, girls, men and boys and key vulnerable and marginalised groups’ ability to meet their basic needs and entitlements?
􀁹 What achievements made on gender equality and the empowerment of women, girls and LGBTQ+ groups are now at risk of being undone by COVID-19?
􀁹 What new or heightened protection and safety risks are arising from COVID-19?
􀁹 How can women, girls, men and boys, and key vulnerable and marginalised groups articipate and lead in the COVID-19 response?
The research was conducted using primary data collected in Rohingya and host communities in Cox’s Bazar between 15 June and 9 July 2020 to understand the impact COVID-19 has had on age, gender and other social characteristics, and to analyse how the socio-cultural context helps or hinders people’s ability to cope with the crisis. The purpose is to generate evidence to support the design of gender-responsive intervention/strategies for the COVID-19 response in Cox’s Bazar that can be used for advocacy and fundraising purposes. Read More...

Las mujeres migrantes y refugiadas venezolanas y su inserción en el mercado laboral peruano: dificultades, expectativas y potencialidades

El trabajo se centró en las regiones de Lima y Callao, La Libertad y Piura, utilizando una aproximación metodológica mixta. A nivel cuantitativo, se analizaron los resultados de la encuesta realizada por CARE Perú, acerca de los medios de vida, medios de protección y salud mental de la población migrante venezolana de Lima y Callao, Piura, La Libertad y Tumbes a inicios de 2020. Con un marco muestral de 503 casos, se obtuvo una perspectiva general sobre diferentes aspectos de la situación laboral de las mujeres migrantes venezolanas en las regiones de estudio. A nivel cualitativo, se realizaron 33 entrevistas semi-estructuradas, que permitieron ahondar en las percepciones de las mujeres venezolanas y de las y los empleadores peruanos. Dada la situación de emergencia sanitaria, a raíz del COVID-19, las entrevistas se llevaron a cabo vía telefónica.

Con respecto a la condición migratoria de esta población, los principales hallazgos son los siguientes: Alrededor del 66% de las mujeres encuestadas tienen entre uno y tres años en el país, lo que coincide con el aumento de los flujos de ingreso durante los años 2018 y 2019. Por su parte, en relación a la documentación migratoria, de las mujeres venezolanas que se encontraban en situación regular, el 56% de ellas contaban con PTP, mientras que el 35% con carné de extranjería.
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COVID 19 IMPACT Assessment Southeast Turkey May 2020

In order to understand the impacts of the COVID-19 global health emergency on the vulnerable or marginalized populations, CARE embarked on an impact assessment in the implementing provinces in Southeast Turkey; namely, Gaziantep, Şanlıurfa and Kilis. The study demonstrates the varied impacts of COVID-19 on the individuals’ lives in terms of education, shelter, WASH, household division of labour, livelihoods and income, negative coping mechanisms, health, mobility and social life as well as protection. The objectives of this assessment are to:
- Understand the impacts of COVID-19 crisis on the needs, coping mechanisms and vulnerabilities among Syrian refugee and vulnerable communities in Southeast Turkey and inform refugee response in Southeast Turkey accordingly.
- Analyse changing gender roles and relations in Southeast Turkey at household level in relation to gender and power differentials
- Provide recommendations on ways in which actors can respond to women, men, girls and boys in Southeast Turkey and provide inclusive and dignified assistance in line with the findings mentioned in above points (not reflected in the infographic though)
that Read More...

WASH in Camps Final KAP Survey in North East Syria

CARE North East conducted an Endline Survey in Areesha and Al Hole camps at Al Hassakeh and Abo Khashab camp in Deir-ez-Zor governorate. In order to achieve the following objective:
• Assess community ability to access the quality of water supply through rehabilitation of water supply networks and chlorination where necessary
• Assess community ability to access to functioning sanitation systems through rehabilitation of sanitation systems and landfills
• Assess community knowledge about maintaining household and community hygiene practices through hygiene promotion.
• Assess the local capacity to sustain these interventions through the development and training of WASH management committees (WMC). Read More...

SHELTER ASSESSMENT – GAZİANTEP AND ŞANLIURFA

Summary of findings from a survey of needs among people in South West Turkey in need of shelter support. Read More...

Strengthening Resilience and Inclusive Governance (STRENPO) Mid-term Review

The Strengthening Resilience and Inclusive Governance Program (STRENPO) is a 4-year programme in the nexus between humanitarian and development work, managed by CARE International in Uganda, in partnership with four Ugandan civil society organisations. The programme commenced in April 2018 for the years 2018-2021.

The overall objective of STRENPO is: Women and youth in vulnerable, natural resource-dependent communities, including refugee settlements, are resilient to shocks and stresses arising from natural resources degradation, climate change, and conflict & displacement.

The overall impression generated from the documents review and the consultations in Uganda is that programme implementation is largely on track compared with work plans; this includes individual partner projects carried out by three ‘old’ partner organisations and RICE-WN as the new partner in the programme. Interventions are well-managed and the STRENPO team in CARE as well as staff in the partner organisations appear dedicated to the implementation of the programme in general and to their particular contribution.

A baseline survey was undertaken in late 2018 and is assessed as a well-planned and executed activity. The study focused on measuring resilience and the result was a sophisticated framework of criteria for categorising indicators of capacity to anticipate and respond appropriately to climate changes. Important information also came out from the Gender Sensitive Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Analysis (G-CVCA) that were undertaken by mid-2019.

- It is therefore recommended to introduce a more diversified approach to the interventions that targets impact groups directly, building on findings from the baseline survey and the G-CVCAs.
- It is recommended that STRENPO continues a strong follow-up to the CAAPs in order to facilitate funding of activities of priority to the involved communities and relevant to the programme’s objectives.
- It is therefore recommended that STRENPO during the coming two years increases the focus on using potential avenues for best practices replication and other catalytic effects.
- It is recommended that the STRENPO partners together selects a handful of the outlined ‘strategic actions’ for further development and specification.
- It is recommended that some of the capacity gaps that have key relevance for the programme are selected, so that it can be decided what type and how much support to the capacity development interventions the programme is able to offer.
- It is recommended that STRENPO in early 2020 reviews its potentials for engaging in stronger partnerships with the private sector, using a market driven analytical approach to determine appropriate interventions and relevant value chain and private sector actors to engage with.
- It is recommended that the STRENPO team engages in a discussion with CARE Danmark to further clarify their understanding and expectations regarding the programme’s inclusion of innovative climate change prevention solutions and a transformative approach to resilience.
- It is recommended that STRENPO undertakes a quick review of its results framework, with the intention to reduce the number of indicators, but also to allow a breakdown on some indicators into refugees and hosts. The revision should also aim at reducing and/or combining the qualitative indicators and progress markers. It is furthermore recommended to review and revise the phrasing of result areas and the Theory of Change, taking note of the suggestions made during the MTR workshop.


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Final Evaluation of the Project Building resilience among refugees and their Jordanian hosts

From the period 1/09/2017- 31/08/2019, CARE International in Jordan implemented a project titled “Building resilience among refugees and their Jordanian hosts” and the project aimed at supporting vulnerable Syrian refugees and Jordanians to enhance resilience and protection, especially from gender-based violence (GBV), through improved access for men and women to dignified, sustainable livelihoods in the Syria crisis highly-impacted areas of Amman, Zarqa and the Azraq refugee camp, while promoting social cohesion between Syrians and vulnerable Jordanians through joint programming and the provision of dignified solutions for long-term urgent cash needs.

Findings
• An effective project design and proposal document which included all components of a proposal document and it is considered to be a strong basis for an effective implementation process.
• Availability of planning documents to include detailed work plans, log frames, need analysis.
• Availability of M&E system.
• Conformity with donor regulations and standards.
• The implemented project responded to a number of strategies to include the Jordan Response plan and CARE International annual plans and strategies.

Conclusions:
According to literature and desk review we conclude the following;
• Project’s provided documents in design and planning phases in addition to the implemented M&E process supported to accelerate the effectiveness of project operations and implementations and this is evident through the desk review and interviews with consortium partners who acknowledge this aspect.
• It is evident that the project was designed to respond to national strategies like the Jordan Response Plan 2018-2020.
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CARE’s ONE NEIGHBOURHOOD APPROACH

Summary of CARE’s “One Neighbourhood Approach,” a programme approach that bridges several areas of expertise – shelter, housing and settlements, infrastructure, livelihoods, markets and economics, community-based protection mechanisms and community regeneration, and through which inclusive governance is mainstreamed. CARE recognised the importance of working with the whole community, so individuals are targeted according to need, while the wider neighbourhood is improved through communal spaces and shared infrastructure. The needs, concerns and rights of both landlords and tenants are addressed through tripartite rental agreements generating greater tenure security over a longer period alongside physical improvements to the building and living space and shelter conditions.

The “One Neighbourhood Approach” in Lebanon has been funded by BPRM since 2015 over a three-phase project in Tripoli and Beirut, with US $7 million cumulatively reaching over 5,000 people directly through household-level shelter interventions and 20,000 people through community infrastructure, both refugees themselves or hosts. Phase 4 of this intervention is due to start in 2018. Read More...

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