Sanitation

Impact Socio-Economique du COVID-19 chez les Jeunes au Niger

Le COVID-19 est une maladie infectieuse découverte à Wuhan (Chine) en décembre 2019. Elle est transmise principalement d’une personne à une autre par le biais de gouttelettes respiratoires expulsées par le nez ou par la bouche lorsqu’une personne malade tousse, éternue ou parle.

Le Niger ne fait pas exception des pays épargnés par le COVID-19. A cet effet, le Gouvernement s’est active à mettre en place avec l’appui des partenaires techniques et financiers des mesures pour lutter contre le virus . Ces mesures ont permis un contrôle efficace de la maladie. Parmi celle-ci, on peut citer la suspension ou limitation des passagers pour les transports en communs, le couvre-feu, l’isolement de la ville de Niamey etc.

Ces mesures bouleversent malheureusement tous les secteurs économiques. Selon le rapport publié par Dispositif National de Prévention et de Gestion des Crises Alimentaires, ces mesures auront un impact sur les dépenses des ménages:
• La mise en quarantaine et le couvre-feu pourraient augmenter de 30% les dépenses liées
à l’alimentation (hausse des prix) ;
• La réduction du temps de travail, la présence des enfants à la maison pourront occasionner
une augmentation de 10% des dépenses d’énergie et d’eau de 30% dans les centres urbains
• L’interdiction des cérémonies sociales (mariage, baptême, funérailles) pourrait faire baisser les dépense y afférentes de 30% dans les villes chef-lieu des régions et de 50%
dans celle de Niamey ;
• Les dépenses liées à la communication pourraient augmenter de 50% à Niamey et 20%
dans les autres centres urbains à cause du confinement (saturation des réseaux);

Les dépenses des ménages liées principalement à l’hygiène corporelle et équipements sanitaires pourront augmenter de 50% en milieu urbain et 10% en milieu rural.

C’est dans ce cadre que Youth Tea, un laboratoire pilote initié par CARE International au Niger a décidé de conduire une analyse sur l’impact socio-économique du coronavirus sur les jeunes filles et garçons en milieu urbain et rural (Communes de Niamey et de Bermo). Read More...

Cyclone Idai Response and Recovery Project in Manicaland Province: Final Evaluation Report

CARE International in Zimbabwe and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) Consortium implemented an ECHO funded project in Chipinge and Chimanimani districts. The consortium implemented early recovery interventions, seeking to address the immediate WASH and basic needs of the Cyclone Idai affected populations. The interventions were centered on a community-based integrated approach focusing on building local capacities and empowering communities to regain control over their lives and become more resilient using a robust cash-based component. The project is targeting a total of 9 wards in Chimanimani and Chipinge districts. The project also implemented integrated WASH support interventions in 2 wards in Chipinge district and 1 ward in Chimanimani district whilst implementing the Multi-Purpose Cash Transfer project in 4 wards in Chimanimani district.

The eleven-month project (1 May 2019 to 30 March 2020) aimed to respond to the urgent needs of vulnerable populations through integrated WASH, food security and livelihoods assistance. The overall objective of the project is to provide immediate access to integrated WASH and food security and livelihoods support to the cyclone-affected population.

The consortium conducted an internal final evaluation survey in ward 1 & 4 of Chipinge district and wards 10, 13, 14, 16, 17 & 21 of Chimanimani district for all the interventions to facilitate evidence-based monitoring and evaluation as well as to match targets with the expected project outcomes. The results will be used to draw lessons learnt for future programming. This survey adopted a quantitative and qualitative methodology. A survey questionnaire with close ended questions administered through KoBo collect. Qualitatively, Focus group Discussions with project beneficiaries and Key Informant interviews were sources of data for this assignment. A review of project documents was also done in assessing the intervention. In selecting project beneficiaries to engage in the end line survey, proportional stratified random sampling was employed.

Acknowledgements
The compilation of the project evaluation report was made possible by individuals who dedicated their valuable time. Sincere gratitude to the CARE International and International Rescue Committee (IRC) project staff for their tireless efforts throughout the course of the evaluation. Appreciation goes to the recruited enumerators who participated actively in the collection and processing of the survey data. Special mention also goes to the project staff and managers for the administrative and logistical support during the exercise. The respondents (Cyclone Response and Recovery Project beneficiaries) in Chipinge and Chimanimani are specially thanked for their participation as units of analysis for the evaluation, without them the exercise would not have been possible. Special mention also goes to the CARE & IRC Monitoring and Evaluation unit for analysis and report writing. Read More...

Integrated Basic Emergency Assistance to Conflict-Affected and Vulnerable Communities in Yemen Project

CARE Yemen has been implementing an OFDA-supported “Integrated Basic Emergency Assistance to Conflict-Affected and Vulnerable Communities” project in four districts (Sudah, As Sawd, Jabal Yazid, and Maswar) of Arman Governorate; two districts (Ash Shagadirah and Ku’aydinah) of Hajjah Governorate; and three districts (Alrujum, Jabal Mahweet, and Hafash) of Al-Mahweet Governorate Yemen. The goal of the project is to improve the basic living conditions, and facilitate early recovery and resilience of internally displaced persons and host communities affected by conflict in Yemen. This project seeks to meet the critical WASH and basic living needs of the most vulnerable households living in the targeted districts so that lives are saved, suffering is alleviated, and human dignity is maintained. The specific objectives of the project are: reduce morbidity from WASH-related diseases of vulnerable IDPs and host communities; enable the most vulnerable IDPs and host communities to meet their basic and immediate needs, and increase their asset base; and improve the food security and nutritional status of the most vulnerable host communities. Read More...

Baseline Survey Report for a WASH project in West Mosul

This is a baseline survey report for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage System" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
There are two priority issues to be addressed by this project: a) significant health risks posed by accumulation of solid waste in key arteries of West Mosul (Cree stream), precluding the effective flow of gray water towards the river as well as damaged pipes which serve to remove black water from residential areas (Al-Thawra neighborhood), and b) limited civic engagement and ownership of residential environment, resulting in poor communal hygiene practices and a high burden on local authorities, which are operating under severely reduced capacity to address needs.
A base-line survey was conducted to identify the current water, hygiene and sanitation conditions in the neighborhood, beneficiaries’ specific needs (disaggregated by men, women, boys and girls) and overall awareness towards water, hygiene and sanitation measures. In order to measure the impact of this projects base line data will be evaluated against end line data collected after project closure. Read More...

Endline evaluation of WASH project in West Mosul, Iraq

This is an endline evaluation for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage Systems" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
This project addressed critical needs for sanitation services in West Mosul, as a direct contribution to enable the affected populations to return home. The project aimed to repair two vital sanitation resources/infrastructure in West Mosul and to support the municipal authorities to build their capacity to eventually recover their costs, once the situation allows. Finally, the project intended to mobilize local communities towards greater ownership for their local environment, to avoid the recurrence of such sanitation risks and maintain a cleaner, more habitable environment. In addition to mitigate a number of health risks related to poor sanitation in urban areas, CARE’s engagement aimed to promote social cohesion and community participation among vulnerable populations affected by the conflict.
The End-line project Evaluation is intended to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements and success of the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men,
women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The Evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations that project staff and the stakeholders might use to improve the design and implementation of other related projects and programs. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

Zambia’s First 1000 Most Critical Days Programme (MCDP)

This report presents the results of a mixed-methods, summative evaluation of Zambia’s First 1000 Most Critical Days Programme (MCDP). The MCDP is a bundled, multi-sectoral programme that aims to reduce stunting in Zambia by 50% by focusing on the most critical period for stunting: pregnant and lactating mothers, and children under 2 years of age. The programme focuses on bringing to scale a strategic subset of routine evidence-based interventions proven to reduce stunting: deworming and vitamin A supplementation; family planning; growth monitoring; iron and folic acid supplementation; iodised salt, micronutrients, and breastfeeding; fortified staples and specialised nutritional products; a mother- and baby-friendly hospital initiative; and management of severely malnourished children (National Food and Nutrition Commission of Zambia [NFNC], 2011). These interventions are supplemented by a range of trainings and behaviour change components designed to take advantage of potential complementarities between child health and improved maternal knowledge, WASH practices, and nutritional intake. The programme is led by the Zambia Food and Nutrition Commission (NFNC) and it involves the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Education (MoE), Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries (MoA), the Ministry of Community Development and Social Welfare (MCD), and the Ministry of Local Government and Housing (MLGH). CARE International is the main technical assistance and fund management partner and the MCDP is funded by the Scaling Up Nutrition network (SUN) in Zambia. (359 pages)
Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis – SNNP Region Ethiopia and Gedeo Crisis Response

As of July 14, conflict between Guji Oromo and Gedeo communities displaced over 1 million people (82 per cent in Gedeo; 19 per cent West Guji zones). Internally displaced people (IDPs) stay in cramped public buildings and spontaneous IDP sites while other live with host communities. This massive and sudden population displacement prompted CARE Ethiopia to expand its emergency programme in the South Nation, Nationalities People Region (SNNPR). Consistent with its focus on gender equality, CARE initiated a rapid gender analysis (RGA) to provide gendered data on needs, power relations, access and controls, risks and coping strategies of displaced women, men, boys and girls affected by the conflict.

An RGA mission led by CARE International Rapid Response Team Gender Specialist took place in Dilla town, Gedeb and Yirgachafe woredas (administrative unit in Ethiopia) between 25 and 31 July. Read More...

Comparing sanitation delivery modalities in informal urban settlement schools

This 14 page journal article from the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Hea... Read More...

Analyse Rapide Genre au sein des réfugiés de la RCA et les communautés hôtes à Timangolo, Lolo, Mbilé. Département de la Kadey- Est Cameroun

Depuis décembre 2013, environ 128550 réfugiés sont arrivés au Cameroun repartis entre la région de l’Est (95075), l’Adamaoua (23060), le Nord (3540) et Yaounde (3540). Dans le Département de la Kadey, à l’Est, la majorité de réfugiés vivent dans des villages d’accueil et les autres dans plusieurs sites dont ceux de Lolo, Mbilé et Timangolo qui accueillent 26124 réfugiés répartis dans 7403 ménages.

Ces nouveaux réfugiés M’bororos, viennent ajouter à des anciens refugiés centrafricains de la même ethnie accueillis et installés dans la zone depuis 2005.

En mai 2014 CARE a conduit des évaluations des besoins qui ont permis de développer une stratégie de réponseaxée dans le domaine de l’eau, l’hygiène et l’assainissement (EHA), la santé mentale et l’appui psychosocial (SMPS), la sécurité alimentaire avec comme cible principale les réfugiés et leurs populations hôtes le long de l’axe Bertoua-Kentzou and Batouri-Toktoyo.
Actuellement CARE met en œuvre des interventions sur l’EHA sur le site de Timangolo et la SMPS dans les sites de Lolo et Mbile.
Afin de mieux répondre aux besoins spécifiques des réfugiés, hommes, femmes, garçons et filles, CARE organise une analyse genre dont l’objectif est d’appréhender les besoins, les vulnérabilités et les capacités spécifiques aux hommes, aux femmes, aux garçons et aux filles ainsi que les relations, les normes et pratiques genre au sein des réfugiés dans les sites de Timangolo, Lolo, Mbile et leurs communautés hôtes. Read More...

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