Women's Economic Empowerment

RAPPORT FINAL IMPACT DES CRISES SUR AUTONOMISATION

Le projet PEF-GS est orienté vers la transformation sociale des relations de pouvoir en matière de : i) d’insécurité alimentaire et de la malnutrition des femmes et des filles en âge de procréer, les enfants de 0 à 5 ans, ii) la transformation des normes et rôles genre, des structures qui perpétuent les inégalités genre au sein du ménage et de la communauté pour une équité du genre. Le projet vise des stratégies de changements sociaux durables en travaillant avec les hommes comme alliées. Il contribue au renforcement des capacités et compétences des organisations de la société civile, engage avec elles des actions de défense des droits des femmes.

Le projet est exécuté dans un contexte affecté par les changements climatiques et les effets de la crise politico sécuritaire qui sévit au Mali depuis 2012. Il intègre des activités qui prennent en compte les changements climatiques, la capacité des ménages à renforcer leur résilience face aux crises climatiques et sécuritaire et la participation des femmes dans les prises de decisions communautaires surtout au niveau des instances de négociation et réconciliation pour la paix. Le projet couvre 30 nouvelles communes dans les régions de Ségou, Mopti et Tombouctou et vise une amélioration des conditions socio-économiques et politiques de 150000 femmes et filles de 15 à 49 ans vulnérables et /ou marginalisées dont 92500 filles des régions de Ségou, Mopti et Tombouctou. Read More...

Women’s Economic Empowerment through Gender Transformative Approaches – Evidence from CARE’s Experience in Middle East & North Africa

CARE defines women’s economic empowerment (WEE) as the process by which women increase their right to economic resources and the power to make decisions that benefit themselves, their families and their communities. Our Theory of Change (as discussed in CARE’s WEE Strategy Document) outlines three conditions necessary for genuine and sustainable economic empowerment for women: increased capabilities, decision-making power and an enabling environment. An integrated approach across all three conditions is required to achieve genuine and sustainable change. Increasing individual women’s capabilities can lead to temporary increases in their economic opportunities and income. However, women’s economic empowerment can only be achieved through also transforming unequal power relations and discriminatory structures.

This Learning Brief is created to provide practical learning and present existing tools applied by CARE Country Offices (COs) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region to encourage a more gender transformative approach to WEE and livelihood programming. This is highly relevant for practicioners from the whole sector working on economic empowerment and livelihood porgramming in fragile settings anywhere in the world. This document can aid a better understanding of gender transformative concepts by livelihood staff, as well as better understanding of the principles of sound economic empowerment by gender staff. This Learning Brief contains many practical insights and allows practicioners to understand how theory and frameworks can have an impact on the actual programming and results on the ground. The Hub encourages teams and practicioners to use this Brief, and the different overviews and examples provided, to reflect on their own work on gender integration, and take steps to move beyond gender responsive programming towards a truly transformative approach for our impact groups.

Learning insights incorporated in the document are based on the learning accumulated by CARE MENA Country Offices (COs) in the last five years under our women’s economic empowerment/livelihood programming. It focuses on two main components of WEE gender transformative programming: economic advancement and gender equality, along with approaches related to engaging men and boys. The evidence of these lessons learned is based on: 1) revision of documentation of more than 12 long term and short term WEE/livelihood programs implemented by CARE in Jordan, Syria, Egypt, West Bank & Gaza, Caucasus and the Balkans, 2) interviews with key informants including gender champions from these COs along with other global CARE gender experts who collectively searched for answers to questions in the themes of gender transformative approaches in WEE programming. Read More...

Women’s economic empowerment in emergency contexts: Niger case study

While discussion of the ‘Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus’ continues within the sector, there remains debate as to whether women’s economic empowerment is a luxury, or even feasible in humanitarian contexts where the priority is to keep people alive. Increasingly, however, humanitarians are seeing interventions aimed at women’s economic empowerment in emergency contexts as a key tool to increase protection and support people in crises to live in dignity. CARE set out to analyse whether financial inclusion strategies like community-led savings groups may in fact represent a way to not only respond to crises, but also to build resilience against them, even in highly fluid contexts.

In June 2018, CARE teams conducted fieldwork in two areas where it is implementing ongoing humanitarian interventions. CARE organised focus groups and interviews with communities and individuals in Diffa and Konni where it has delivered humanitarian assistance. The interventions combined blanket cash distributions, and the establishment of savings and credit groups which also provided women with life skills and business training to set up small businesses.

Within a crisis setting, combining a savings group structure including income generation support with humanitarian assistance such as food and non-food items (NFIs) helped women not only to meet basic needs in a more sustainable way, but also improved their independent access to and control over money.

During emergencies, providing women with humanitarian cash to cover basic needs allowed women in savings groups to continue saving and to invest in income generating activities (IGA), rather than using up capital on food.

If crises continue to hit, the positive impact of savings groups set up in emergencies can become strained. In this case, further cash interventions can preserve small businesses.

Membership of savings groups and receipt of IGAs and life skills training increased women’s income and confidence. Membership of a savings group provides psychosocial benefits to women who are suffering anxiety, depression or trauma by providing a social network that meets and talks regularly. Read More...

Women Income Generation Through Livelihood Development (WIGLD) Project

Women Income Generation Through Livelihood Development (WIGLD) project is a project funded by Beyond the 11th. The project is helping afghan women to improve their economy and to support themselves and their children.

The project has been operational in Afghanistan since 2003. The overall project goal is to contribute to the economic development of vulnerable women. Currently, the project is operational in two sub-districts of Kabul province. The project targets 1,000 women-headed household through the establishment of 56 Community Based Saving Groups (CBSGs). The project beneficiaries receive different support such as teaching them life skills, including basic literacy and numeracy, environmental and basic hygiene, and business development skills and provision of marketing opportunities for their products.

This report is the result of a Midterm Review (MTR) conducted to find out the level of changes made toward project objectives and highlights programmatic strengths and challenges that can inform future efforts of the project in the remaining life span of the project. The review has been conducted by CARE PQ department through with support of daily wage data enumerators who have been hired for a short period. The assessment targeted 278 beneficiaries of the project and has also conducted 10 FGDs to know the insight of the project participants. Read More...

Etude de base du projet « Autonomisation des femmes à travers l’entreprenariat durable »

Report on the Baseline Assessment carried out for the CARE Morocco project AFED (Autonomisation des femmes à travers l’entrepreneuriat durable), also known as WESE in English (Women’s Empowerment through Sustainable Entrepreneurship). This project is implemented in the region of Marrakech between May 2018 and April 2023 and is funded by Global Affairs Canada. Read More...

Labour Rights for Female Construction Workers Cambodia

CARE International in Cambodia (CARE) implemented the three-year Labour Rights for Female Construction Workers (LRCW) project, with funding from the European Union and the Austrian Development Agency, from January 2016 to December 2018 to enhance the protections for women in the construction sector. The project aimed to strengthen the capacity of female construction workers, civil society and government, and increase the voice and influence of female construction workers. The LRCW project partners included the Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training (MoLVT), Cambodian Women for Peace and Development (CWPD), Legal Support for Children and Women (LSCW) and the Building and Wood Workers Trade Union Federation of Cambodia (BWTUC). The target areas included seven districts in Phnom Penh.
The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the progress towards the project’s goal and
outcomes, to evaluate the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability of the
project, to capture lessons learnt, and generate key recommendations for future programming.
The evaluation included quantitative and qualitative methods involving a desk review, interviews
with 171 female construction workers, separate group discussions with 26 female and male
construction workers, and individual interviews with 21 project partner staff and other key
stakeholders. The evaluation took place from 25 January to 25 March 2019, including visits to
ten construction sites in five districts around Phnom Penh. Read More...

Women For Change Cohort 1 and 2

Le présent document est le fruit de la consultation relative à l’évaluation finale du projet Women For Change à Guéyo (Cohorte 1). Ce projet, intervenant dans un contexte où les femmes dans les communauté de la Côte d’Ivoire sont confrontées à des disparités basées sur des croyances sociales et des structures de pouvoir qui sous-estiment leur valeur dans la société et dans ce cas précis, leur contribution à l’agriculture, vise à autonomiser les femmes productrices de cacao et les femmes vivant dans les ménages de cacaoculteurs pour qu'elles participent davantage au développement
communautaire et à la prise de décision sur la gestion des entreprises et des moyens de subsistance des cacaoculteurs à travers 3 piliers : (i) Accès au leadership et à la formation sur les compétences de vie courante (lifeskills) ; (ii) L’engagement des hommes et des garçons, engagement pour l'égalité des sexes, y compris le dialogue des couples ; (iii) L'apprentissage et la recherche pour démontrer le lien entre la productivité et l’autonomisation des femmes.
L’objectif de l’évaluation finale est de démontrer de façon significative l'impact du programme qui devra conserver la spécificité du contexte et des significations culturelles du changement de comportement des femmes et des hommes. Read More...

Impact of the community infrastructure improvement project on women’s economic empowerment

This 43 page report highlights how working with women in the Community Infrastructure Improvement Pr... Read More...

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