Women's Economic Empowerment

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

RAPPORT DEFINITIF BASELINE PROSPER II Thriving Cocoa Community Cargill

Cette étude dont l’objectif était de déterminer la situation actuelle des ménages producteurs de cacao dans les treize (13) nouvelles communautés sélectionnées du Projet PROSPER II sur les quatre (04) axes d’intervention du projet : (i) la gouvernance communautaire ; (ii) l’inclusion financière et des compétences entrepreneuriales des femmes ; (iii) la diversification des sources de revenus des ménages agricoles incluant la nutriton ; (iv) les solutions alternatives communautaires au travail des enfants ; afin que puissent être mesurés les changements qui interviendront après les trois (03) prochaines années de mise en œuvre, en utilisant la même approche, a démontré que la situation actuelle desdits ménages n’est guère réluisante. C’est ce que l’analyse des résultats combinés aux sources sécondaires et primaires notamment la collecte de terrain et les discussions de groupe nous permet d’indiquer. [97 pages]. Read More...

A Social Impact Analysis of CARE’s ‘Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment ’ Project

The Enhancing Women’s Voice to Stop Sexual Harassment project (STOP), an initiative of CARE Australia, has been working since 2017 to prevent and address the under-reported problem of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector. At the time of writing, STOP is the only initiative that addresses this issue on a multi-country scale within the sub-region. Operating across a pool of garment factories in four Mekong countries—Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam—STOP aims to enhance women’s voice and economic rights at both the national and factory levels. Based on a socio-ecological model of violence prevention, CARE Country Offices (COs) are working with participating factories to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less SH through the implementation of standardised SH reporting mechanisms and rigorous training programs. Supported by CARE Regional staff, each CARE CO engages with relevant country, regional and international stakeholders to strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address SH in the workplace.

In 2018, CARE Australia commissioned a consortium of researchers from UNSW Sydney and UNSW Canberra to undertake an independent evaluation the STOP project and provide a separate Social Impact Assessment (SIA) focused on Cambodia STOP as the particular case study. The SIA is intended to complement the findings of the Final Evaluation (FE) of the STOP, as implemented in the other three project sites. The SIA and the Final Evaluation should be read as two parts of a single whole. The UNSW team drew upon a range of evaluative sources including factory surveys, focus group discussions and key informant interviews with factory workers, middle management and government officials. A conceptual framework is also advanced in order to better capture the nuances of social impact and gender transformation, and to provide a rigorous basis on which to evaluate STOP’s development and implementation in Cambodia. [94 pages]. Read More...

Integrated GBV prevention and response in Northeast Nigeria Endline Report

Context The ECHO-GBV prevention and response is an integrated GBV and livelihood project which was implemented as an entry point for CARE Nigeria into GBV-standalone initiatives. The project was funded by European Commission Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) under the supervision of CARE France. The project anticipated to provide direct service to displaced vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys and vulnerable host community members in Bama and Ngala, majority of the project participants were women and girls and indirectly benefits to the larger community. The intervention was anticipated to reach a total of 7,832 project participants. The global objective of the project was to contribute to the protection of the lives of vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys most affected by the crisis in northeastern Nigeria. The specific objective of the project was to enhance the access of newly displaced, vulnerable women, men, girls, and boys to life-saving GBV prevention and response services through coordinated, principled humanitarian support and community-based prevention activities. The project had six expected results:
• R 1. GBV prevention, care, and response services available and accessible to newly displaced individuals and vulnerable host community members at risk of or affected by GBV.
• R 2. Awareness, knowledge, and application of humanitarian principles and SEA prevention and response principles improved among humanitarian actors and security forces.
An end-line study was conducted as a part of the project monitoring and evaluation strategies and framework to review its projects before, during, and after the post-implementation phase. The endline was conducted by CARE Nigeria in August 2020 [31 pages]. Read More...

Building Sustainable Livelihoods for Refugees and the Poor, especially Women

The project “Building Sustainable Livelihoods for Refugees and the Poor, especially Women” is a sixteen-month’s project that was implemented by CARE Jordan between April 2019 and July 2020 and funded by Rotary International. The project focused on building the capacity of 175 Jordanian and Syrians entrepreneurs in order to create and accelerate local businesses through conducting small business building and mentoring sessions and distributing toolkits.
The project was implemented in East Amman area which is classified as one of the less fortunate areas in Jordan.
The overall goal of this project was building the capacity of entrepreneurs, community leaders, local organizations, and community networks to support economic development in impoverished communities; developing opportunities for productive work; and reducing poverty in underserved communities. [53 pages]
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ESTUDIO DE SATISFACCIÓN SOBRE SERVICIOS PROMOVIDOS POR EL PROYECTO ALMA LLANERA – INTEGRACIÓN SOSTENIBLE DE REFUGIADOS Y MIGRANTES VENEZOLANOS Final Evaluation

CARE Perú viene ejecutando desde setiembre del 2019 el Proyecto Alma Llanera (el Proyecto) en las regiones de Lima, Callao, La Libertad, Piura y Tumbes con el objetivo general de mejorar la autosuficiencia y la integración de los/as refugiados/as y migrantes venezolanos/as vulnerables en Perú a través de un mayor acceso a los servicios de protección, salud mental y apoyo a medios de vida.
El objetivo general de la investigación ha sido medir el nivel de satisfacción de la población atendida por el Proyecto ante los niveles de seguridad en y alrededor del lugar donde habitan, así como con los servicios de protección, salud mental y apoyo psicosocial que ellos/as o sus familias reciben del Proyecto y/o del Estado. 98 pages. Read More...

Unconditional Cash Grant (UCG) Post Distribution Monitoring Report

In response to dire need of women headed household in Kabul whose economy was severely impacted  by the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting continued lockdown, CARE Afghanistan implemented an  emergency response project. Due to the weak health system and limited capacity to deal with major disease outbreaks, communities in different part of country was significantly affected both directly from the COVID-19 and resulting socio-economic impacts. In addition to weak health system, poverty, limited job opportunity, people reliance on daily work, retailing combined with political turmoil putting pressure on the country’s capacity to effectively provide inclusive response and required coordination and response. CARE over three months’ period - officially started in 01st May ending July 31, 2020 implemented an Emergency Response Fund (ERF) project through which provided livelihood cash based response and as well as COVID-19 Health response through scale up existing health project implemented in Kabul. The health response involved provision of hygiene/antiseptic kits to the 1700 most vulnerable HHs and 150 PPE to health center; provision of un-conditional cash grant to the 525 most vulnerable women headed households of Kabul Women Association (KWA) member to help them cover Health and/or livelihoods needs during quarantine period and provision of health and hygiene awareness to the target population most vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreak. Read More...

Ethnic Minority Women’s Empowerment in Vietnam

Women in remote ethnic communities in Vietnam are not equally benefiting from the remarkable economic growth over the past decade. They experience high levels of poverty, unequal participation in economic opportunities, limited options to adapt to changes in the climate, and have a limited voice in decisions that affect them. CARE’s Ethnic Minority Women’s Empowerment project (EMWE), supported by Australian Aid, works with ethnic minority women to overcome these challenges. Read More...

Laos Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 July 2020

As of 29 June 2020,10,280,397 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 505,145 deaths have been recorded across 213 territories countries and territories and 2 international conveyances. To date, the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) has confirmed 19 cases, mainly in the Vientiane Capital. The Government of Lao PDR has acted swiftly since the first reported infection to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Since 13 April 2020, no new confirmed cases have been reported.

Although Lao PDR has been able to avoid the worst health impacts of the pandemic, prevention measures such lockdown, closure of schools and businesses, social distancing and travel restrictions, have had significant economic and social impacts across the country. Gender roles, relations and norms within Lao society have influenced the impact of these measures on different genders. Drawing on primary and secondary data, this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has found that the pandemic has both reinforced traditional gender norms as well as provided opportunities for men and women to work together to address the current crisis. This reflects broader gender roles and relations in Lao society in which forces of modernization are challenging and changing traditional gender norms. Read More...

Applying Behavioral Science to Humanitarian Cash & Voucher Assistance for Better Outcomes for Women in MENA

Ideas42 and CARE International conducted research in three of CARE’s countries of presence—Iraq, Jordan, and Turkey—to develop a thorough understanding of the contexts in which women recipients in these settings receive, make decisions on, and use CVA to support themselves and their households. In the pages that follow, we aim to share behavioral insights that shed new light on the many challenges facing women when using CVA in humanitarian settings in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. In summary, some of the key design principles that can increase the impact of CVA for women include minimizing the mental burdens placed on women throughout the transfer process, priming women to affirm positive identities at key times, making the full range of what CVA can be used for visible, and framing CVA in ways that encourages planning and careful consideration of spending priorities.

Though the guidance is best used during project assessment and design, it can be adapted to different phases in the project cycle. Users are encouraged to ensure that a wider range of specialists participate in discussions seeking to incorporate the guidance—including CVA Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) teams, and sector specialists or technical leads. It can also be used as a point of reflection for evaluation or after-action reviews. In addition, the involvement of program support staff and senior management will be valuable to ensure that the points are actionable and properly resourced. Overall, we hope that this guidance at the least starts a wider conversation on applied behavioral science in the humanitarian space and encourages humanitarian organizations to work to implement behaviorally-informed programs with CVA. Read More...

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