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Learning from the SAFE Justice Community Score Card: Final Learning Report

The SAFE Justice Community Score Card process was a local adaptation of Community Score Card models used globally and in Nepal in other sectors. Its design was led by CARE Nepal, through a participatory process with DFID and IP-SSJ partners, and focused on GBV response services provided by the Nepal police and Judicial Committees. This report details the final reflections of CARE Nepal and partner project staff on how the process worked and what could be strengthened in future. It also provides a set of recommendations for the sustainability and institutionalization of the CSC in the justice sector.

The CSC models introduced within SAFE Justice and in Search for Common Ground’s Pahunch project (around the same time) were the first to be trialed in the justice sector in Nepal. The CSC model CARE has implemented through SAFE Justice was informed by CARE’s extensive global experience with CSCs, but is also heavily based on the outputs of a co-design workshop with CARE Nepal, Search for Common Ground Nepal, SAFE Justice partners, and DFID Nepal, in Kathmandu in August 2017.1 This local model was documented and set out in a bespoke manual (SAFE Justice Community Score Card: A Field Guide for Nepal),2 and that manual was then updated and re-issued based on findings from a review and adaptation process in 2018, and then again based on the final reflection process outlined in this report (in August 2019).3
Overall, the chosen sectoral focus of the justice sector, and in particular the application of the CSC model in the midst of Nepal’s transitioning subnational governance structure, was an ambitious choice within SAFE Justice. Despite this, the process has demonstrated strong positive results, particularly in terms of improved police-community relations and community awareness of, and connection to, the new Judicial Committees.
However, the context did necessitate a particularly flexible and adaptive approach, in order to shift the structures and stakeholders involved with the CSC, in step with major political changes. While the CSC was not set up as a formal ‘pilot’ per se, CARE tried to treat it as such, scheduling deliberate junctures to reflect on the functioning of the model, hear from frontline staff on what is working and what is challenging, making and documenting concrete adaptations along the way. Read More...

Mid-Term Evaluation of the Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) in Mukuru and Kajiado, 2019

BACKGROUND
The Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) is a five-year (2015-2020) education project that is seeking to empower marginalized in-and out-of-school adolescent girls and boys aged 10-19 years in urban informal Nairobi (Mukuru) and rural Kajiado areas of Kenya. The AEP is focusing on three main areas: (i) adolescent sexual and reproductive health, (ii) economic empowerment and (iii) use of ICT to support and enhance learning.

OBJECTIVES
The specific objectives of the midline study were to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of adolescents on ASRH, gender norms, saving and economic empowerment, financial literacy, youth leadership and decision making, education and schooling.

METHODS
Quantitative and qualitative methods were used.

KEY FINDINGS
- The AEP was associated with likelihood of adolescents seeking SRH services, increased confidence to access SRH services and higher intention to use contraceptives.
- Negative gender norms and harmful traditional practices are prevalent, especially in Kajiado.
- The AEP was associated with increasing adolescents’ likelihood to save.
- At midline, there were increases in adolescents with economic empowerment.
- The AEP was associated with increasing adolescents’ financial literacy.
- The AEP was associated with greater participation in youth groups and improved youth leadership norms.
- The AEP had marginal effects on schooling outcomes such as learning and attendance.
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Emergency Response for Drought Affected Households in Northern Afghanistan Project: Baseline Survey Report

CARE’s Emergency Response for Drought Affected Households in Northern Afghanistan (OFDA) Project has planned to assist 4,100 households in two Provinces (Balkh and Samangan) in Northern Afghanistan. This baseline study was conducted to establish baseline values for indicators of intended outcomes and collect information about the target group prior to intervention. Read More...

End-Line Assessments Report: Emergency Response for Drought Affected Households in Northern Afghanistan Project

CARE implemented Emergency Response for Drought Affected Households in Northern Afghanistan project since between August 2018 and August 2019. Initially the project was designed for a 12 months’ period, but the project received approval from donor for a no cost extension following CARE request for a month NCE in order to offset the setback experienced in identifying/selecting local partner’s for the project. The project, was therefore completed in 13-month timeframe.

The project was aimed at improving health, economic condition, hygiene behaviors and practices, and protection for the most vulnerable people affected by drought in Northern Afghanistan. Through this project CARE responded to humanitarian needs of 4,100 HH (24,600 individual) vulnerable IDPs and host communities affected by seasonal drought, including the most affected children in two selected provinces of Balkh and Samangan provinces. In addition, most vulnerable women headed household/their adult children received support through multi-purpose cash as well health, and hygiene awareness interventions.

This report summarize key findings and results of end line assessment conducted in the intervention areas targeted under the project in order to evaluate the project’s effectiveness and outcome achieved in comparison to the baseline situation. Read More...

Case Study on Project Model of “My Right to My Future – Women’s Participation in Peace Building and Conflict Resolution” 2015-2017

“Peace” remains a very controversial term in the Palestinian society. Talking about peace while tensions are again on the rise and divisions are growing seems like a hopeless task for many. In Palestinian context; peace building does not only refer to Israel and Palestine, but also refers to internal conflicts and the political division between the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. These internal challenges are a main theme in this project and a high priority among the communities. Both cross-border negotiations as well as talks between national actors share the great absence of female voices and women representatives. A main need for inclusive peace building that can have a real impact is the greater involvement of women in circles of conflict resolution.

This document serves as a summary of the project’s implementation model, main activities and results highlighting the key choices for success. Data for this document came from team’s mid-term reports and the final evaluation, for which an external consultant collected data through focus groups, questionnaires and research. The Final Evaluation of this project is available for reference upon request. This model also connects to CARE Women Empowerments strategy (formulated in the document Gender Transformative Insights), which can also be requested from the project team for reference. Read More...

MY RIGHT TO MY FUTURE – WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION IN PEACE BUILDING AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

CARE International, presented by CARE WBG, collaborated for a second time with Women’s Affairs Technical Committee to implement the action “My Right to My Future – Women’s Participation in Peace Building and Conflict Resolution”. The action was implemented between April 2015 and September 2017, in all governorates of the Gaza Strip and nine governorates from the West Bank. The final beneficiaries were from political parties, local media outlets and 220 young activists from the twenty communities were involved in the different stages of the project.

The project aimed at establishing the conditions for the advancement of the peace process by strengthening the political and societal participation of women leaders for a just and lasting peace. This overall goal was planned to be achieved through the two specific objectives; 1) promote women leadership to play influential role within political parties; 2) shifting social attitudes towards women’s political participation and empowering youth and specifically young women to play an active role in civil society peace building and reconciliation.

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The Status of Political Participation of Palestinian Women Under UNSCR 1325

The overall objective of thi research is to examine the different factors which influence Palestinian women’s political participation in compatibility with the principles of UNSCR 135, which focuses on considering the privacy of women and involving them in the processes of preservation of security and creating peace particularly in the areas affected by the conflict. Read More...

Supporting civil society in socio- economic development at local level

In early 2018, the EU Delegation in Egypt launched the mid-term evaluation of Component 3 of the Support for Partnership, Reforms and Inclusive Growth (SPRING) Programme in Egypt. The Programme encompasses two main components, namely socio-economic development and support to civil society.
The overall objective of the programme is to “improve the socio-economic conditions and rights of the poorest and those most in need of the population“. Read More...

Addressing Food Crisis in Yemen

In 2017, in response to the one of the world's worst manmade crises, a consortium of CARE and Action Contra La Faim (ACF) implemented a EU-Funded Multi-Purpose Cash program in Abyan and Amran governorates with a mean aim of enhancing food security (FS) as well as supporting livelihood activities, savings groups and the resilience of communities with the rehabilitation of critical community-identified shared assets. The program design was aligned to the Humanitarian Development Nexus framework, which focuses on a shift from supplying humanitarian assistance to those who need it, to reducing the demand for humanitarian assistance by addressing the root causes.

This report presents the evaluation findings from the project during over its full implementation period (October 2017- February 2019) in the targeted areas. It uses the DAC Evaluation Criteria: Relevance, Efficiency, Effectiveness, Impact and Sustainability. It also provides insight on the internal and external factors influencing the achievement (or non-achievement) of the project objectives. The analysis should inform decisions about replicating interventions, draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the implementation strategies, highlight lessons learned and lead to recommendations to inform future programming and policymaking. Read More...

ENHANCING THE FOOD SECURITY AND LIVELIHOODS COPING MECHANISMS FOR CONFLICT AFFECTED COMMUNITIES IN IMOTONG STATE

CARE South Sudan has been operating in the former Eastern Equatoria State (now Imotong State) since 2015. Since fiscal year to 2017 to 2018, CARE South Sudan, received funds from SDC to support improve the resilience capacity of food insecure and conflict affected communities of Torit County and Pageri Administrative Area of Imotong State, South Sudan. The project was aimed to improve the food security, livelihoods, gender relations at household level and peaceful coexistence among 2,900 households (approximately 17,400 individuals). The target Bomas of the project Fodofodo, Ifuanyak, Nyong and Ilangi in Nyong Payam; Moti/Enyif in Ifwotu Payam in Torit County. Abila, Anzara and Rei in Nimule Payam and Avumadria, Masindi, Bilinya and Gandzi in Mugali Payam of Pageri County. Read More...

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