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Renewing a Long-Term Strategic Partnership: Lessons learned from 20 years of collaboration in global health and development between CARE and Emory University

Over more than 20 years, CARE USA (CARE) and Emory University (EU) – principally within the Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH) – have collaborated across global health and development sectors, including water and sanitation (WASH), maternal and child nutrition, food security, HIV/AIDS, and women’s empowerment. This collaboration has included joint research projects, training for CARE field staff, student employment and training, guest lectures by CARE staff at Emory, and employment opportunities at CARE for former Emory students following graduation.
Several high-profile joint research projects have included SWASH+ (Kenya: 2006-2019) and the Tipping Point Project (Nepal: 2019-pres). School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene plus Community Impact (SWASH+) was a 13- year project that is an exemplar of the impact of CARE and Emory collaborations. It has resulted in over 20 publications from both institutions, including policy papers that have contributed significantly to increasing the scale, impact, and sustainability of school WASH interventions in Kenya. The Tipping Point project aims to empower adolescent girls and their communities to delay marriage and to promote girls’ rights in Nepal and
Bangladesh.
RSPH researchers commenced a four-year partnership with CARE to strengthen the rigor and visibility of the impacts of this program. These projects have resulted in co-funded grants, peer-reviewed manuscripts, and conference presentations (see Appendix A for a complete list). [21 pages] Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

CARE Every Voice Counts Afghanistan Endline Evaluation

In Afghanistan, the Every Voice Counts program (EVC) is focused on women and girls as primary target groups in four Provinces - Balkh, Parwan, Kabul and Khost. The program worked at community, district, and provincial levels to strengthen the capacity of women and girls to participate in decision-making. This included the formation of women's groups in the target communities, which serve as platforms for stakeholder organization and capacity building. The program advocated for the inclusion of women and girls in decision-making with community leaders and the various bodies of sub-national government. The program was aimed to achieve:
• Increase meaningful participation of women and girls in decision-making processes.
• Create and expand inclusive spaces for dialogue and negotiation at the local and national levels.
• Increase attention on the importance of the rights of women and girls.
• Enable participation in political debates and dialogues with the Afghan authorities and public.
• Improved availability, accessibility and quality of girls’ education and health services.
TAGHEER conducted an end-line evaluation of the EVC to understand the achievement or lack thereof of the program against the above listed aims. The evaluation report developed by TAGHEER will serve as an input for the global evaluation report of EVC program in 6 countries. [83 Pages] Read More...

Jarablus Needs Overview

Since January 2020, Syria's economic future is increasingly becoming uncertain. Regional actors and local commmunities, who were previously acting as an economic bridge to the outside world, are facing their own economic turmoil and leaving Syria isolated with unprecedent depreciation of the Syrian Pound. The interlinked nature of Syria’s politics, economy and infrastructure are now forcing citizens to choose between the uncertainty of a pandemic or reality of household deprivation at the confluence of the conflict, economic crisis and COVID-19 pandemic.

This infographic aims to present an overview of the needs in Jarablus through an internal analysis of data collected by
Humanitarian Needs Assessment Programme during the months of July and August 2020. Read More...

Informed to Influence: Increasing ethnic minority women’s access to information for improved governance and development

“Informed to influence: Increasing ethnic minority women’s access to information for improved governance and development” in Vietnam which supported a Network of Civil Society Organisations to represent the interests of ethnic minorities in Northern Vietnam, strengthened the voice of ethnic minority women through livelihood and rights clubs and contributed to the implementation of the Law on access to information. Read More...

2nd RAPID ANALYSIS How are female garment factory workers during COVID-19

CARE Bangladesh has conducted the mobile based 1st Rapid Analysis in April’20 to understand COVID-19 impacts on lives and livelihoods of female factory workers. That study reveals, 25% doesn’t know protection measures, 35% feels uncertain about salary, 35% faced food shortage, 28% were getting fear to loose job and 91% were suffering from anxiety. 2nd Rapid Analysis is a follow-up survey on the same target group keeping the same objective, looking into more deep-dive issues. Read More...

Economic Strengthening for a Sustainable Return to Kosovo Midterm Report

Provision to the improvement of living conditions of IDPs and returnees from readmission process in Serbia and support to the sustainable return to Kosovo/Economic Strengthening for a Sustainable Return to Kosovo

The project “Economic Strengthening for a Sustainable Return to Kosovo”, being implemented over a period of 24 months, from July 11, 2018 to July 11, 2020. It is funded by the Delegation of the European Union to the Republic of Serbia and implemented in Serbia, specifically South Serbia, Pcinja District, the City of Vranje, and municipalities Vladicin Han, Surdulica, Bosilegrad, Trgoviste, Bujanovac and Presevo, by CARE and local CSO Nexus as a project partner, and municipality of Vranje, as the supporting project partner.

The overall goal of the project is to enable IDPs and returnees from the readmission process to exercise their full rights, supported by enabling migration policies and processes in Republic of Serbia. This wider impact is planned to be achieved through reaching the specific objective - to support the sustainable process of return to Kosovo, for IDPs and readmissions - persons returned to Republic of Serbia according to the Readmission Agreement in the process of reintegration. The Action was envisaged to provide actions to support a sustainable return of beneficiaries interested to move their households and businesses to Kosovo*. As the narrative interim report demonstrated, there were some alterations in the setup of the project as a result of external political circumstances, which influenced these activities.
Read More...

A RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS OF THE AUGUST 2020 BEIRUT PORT EXPLOSION

On August 4 2020, the devastating Beirut explosion shook the whole city to its core, taking the lives of 191 persons (120 males, 58 females, and 13 unspecified), wounding at least 6,500, and leaving 300,000 people displaced. Prior to the explosion, Lebanon’s crisis has been underpinned by extreme structural gender inequalities: Lebanon ranks 145 out of 153 countries in the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report, due to low rates of women’s economic and political participation and patriarchal socio-cultural norms. The impact of the explosion compounded with the worst economic crisis in the history of Lebanon and the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to significantly push back what gains have been made on gender equality in the country.
This joint rapid gender analysis (RGA) of the Beirut port explosion assesses how diverse women, men, girls, boys, and gender minorities were affected by the events of August 4, with a close look at the specific impact on older, disabled, refugee, migrant, and LBQT (lesbian, bisexual, queer, and trans) women.
The assessment combined a secondary review of existing data with primary data collection. Secondary analysis included reviewing 45 reports, sit-reps, and needs assessments published by United Nations (UN) agencies, international and non-governmental organizations (I/NGOs) since the explosion and conducting gender analysis on three quantitative datasets from assessments carried out in response to the explosion. Primary data consisted of 16 key informant interviews (KIIs), 4 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 17 participants, and 16 community interviews – a total of 49 people overall.
Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Northeast Nigeria – Borno

Borno is a state in northeast Nigeria. Borno has been the epicentre of the Organized A since it began its insurgency in 2009. Records of Boko Haram operations show that thousands of people have either been murdered or kidnapped as a result of the group’s activities from July 27, 2009, through late 2019.
For Borno, COVID-19 is a “crisis within a crisis” and presents a range of challenges in a context with limited resources. In most localities (named local government areas or LGAs), access to quality health services, including intensive care, is limited. Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) e.g. malaria, water borne illnesses (including cholera) and malnutrition represent the main cause of premature mortality in the state. In addition, food security and livelihoods are particularly precarious due to semi-subsistence lifestyles and heavy dependence on the informal sector for income.
Because Borno has been in a protracted crisis since 2009, gender has been a key consideration in the response. However, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Borno continues to disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways, as women are more likely to stay home to help with the increased domestic tasks. With the fear of contracting COVID-19, permission granted by men to access health services is decreasing which is negatively affecting women and girls’ access to maternal, sexual and reproductive health services. In addition, Gender Based Violence (GBV) service providers in Borno have reported a heightened risk of increased domestic violence in areas where pre-existing rates of violence against women in IDP camps are already very high. Additionally, with the recent loss of livelihoods, strained humanitarian interventions and inadequate field feedback handling mechanisms, Prevention of Sexual Harassment Exploitation and Abuse (PSHEA) and mitigation is a pressing concern as people in need are left vulnerable in the face of insufficient food and resources. Read More...

AN INTERSECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF GENDER AMONGST ROHINGYA REFUGEES AND HOST COMMUNITIES IN COX’S BAZAR

The Rohingya ethnic minority population in Myanmar have been persecuted over generations and are denied of their fundamental human rights. Violence, discrimination and persecution in Myanmar have eventually led the stateless Rohingya people to flee
to Bangladesh from Rakhine State in successive waves over the last four decades. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, reaching the total number of 914,998 people and constituting the largest refugee camp
in the world. The rapid and sizable influx of Rohingya refugees now outnumbers locals nearly three to one in the two sub-districts, Ukhiya and Teknaf, where refugees and the subsequent humanitarian response have had an impact on the host community.
This inter-agency research is commissioned by ActionAid in collaboration with UNHCR and CARE Bangladesh to investigate how age, gender and diversity issues are addressed in the humanitarian response amongst Rohingya refugees and the host communities. The
quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 03 December 2019 to 07 January 2020. This transdisciplinary research aims to fill a significant gap by providing a critical analysis of the present status of gender relations addressed in humanitarian response, taking into consideration the intersectionality among specific needs based on age, gender and other diversity factors contributing to a person or group’s vulnerability.
This study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the change in context, it has now become even more imperative to adapt existing mechanisms within the ongoing response, especially the need for increased Age, Gender and Diversity (AGD) analysis and monitoring of vulnerabilities. While COVID-19 was not a factor in this report, the recommendations of this report need to be addressed and implemented with the changing context in mind. Read More...

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