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Livelihoods Advancement for Marginalized Populations (LAMP)

CARE International’s Livelihood Advancement for Marginalized Populations (LAMP) project aims to create job opportunities and address the constraints faced by marginalized populations – Internally Displaced People (IDP), returnees, women, and youth – in securing jobs and business opportunities.
This gender analysis and baseline survey for the LAMP project is intended to create benchmarks for its key indicators and to help LAMP prioritize its interventions. The findings of this study will be used to create the baseline values of the key outcome indicators outlined in the LAMP Activity Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Plan (AMELP) and inform appropriate interventions regarding livelihoods advancement and gender related activities.
CARE/LAMP and CBMC purposively selected the four provinces of Kabul, Khost, Ghazni and Balkh as intervention areas under LAMP. Random sampling was used to select a sub-group of intervention household groups and systematic random sampling was used to select a control group of respondents. Data collection enumerators and field supervisors were trained on the data collection tools and methodology to trail the approach with a sub-set of households prior to the survey. Focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) with secondary stakeholders provided qualitative and local context and a means to triangulate household survey findings. CBMC conducted three FGDs and three KIIs in each province, except for Kabul where KIIs were not possible due to the time constraints of government stakeholders and officials. The secondary stakeholders reached in this study were the MORR, MOWA, MAIL and MOLSAMD. Read More...

Mid-Term Strategic Review of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity

CARE commissioned a Mid-Term Strategic Review (MTSR) of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity to formulate recommendations for the remaining life of the project to increase effectiveness in achieving sustainable impact. The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is being implemented in 27 Woredas in the three regions of Tigray, Amhara, and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples and is just over the midway point in its five-year life from December 5, 2016, through December 3, 2021. The purpose of the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is to reduce food insecurity and increase resilience for 97,900 chronically food insecure households that are enrolled in the fourth cycle of the Government of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP4), enabling them to graduate with resilience from the PSNP4.

The MTSR for the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity was a formative evaluation exercise intended to provide guidance on ways to improve the effectiveness of the program in achieving intended impact.

Relative to the four global learning questions for the MTSR (see page 4), the MTSR found that the model that the Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is implementing is effective for achieving graduation with resilience, but because frontline delivery is constrained by the number of staff, their technical capacities and the degree of supervision and support that they receive, interventions are not always going deeply enough to ensure behavioral change. The program is empowering women both economically and socially through the VESA platform, but there are significant variations between regions; and outside of the VESA, there is some evidence to suggest that women’s empowerment has not yet been well incorporated, especially in value chain participation and MFI linkages. Progress is certainly being made in transferring ideas and knowledge to PSNP counterparts, but that has not yet translated into practice mainly because of resource constraints. Key approaches that need to be added or strengthened in the coming two years include expanding frontline delivery capacities, expanding efforts to ensure that strategies and approaches are well understood by implementation staff at all levels in all partners, ensuring that women’s empowerment is included in all approaches by all partners, and looking for new ways to facilitate access to jobs, either through self-employment or wage employment, for youth from PSNP households.

The Livelihoods for Resilience Activity is already doing some very nice work in starting to achieve sustainable impact. The project has strong potential to be recognized as a “great” project if it can make some adjustments.
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Midline Report of the HALOW+ Health Intervention

HALOW+ (an extension of the Health Access and Linkage Opportunities for Workers project) is a partnership among GSK, M&S, and CARE, aimed at increasing Bangladeshi factory workers’ knowledge, empowerment, and access to health services. These workers often have low economic and social status, making it difficult for them to advocate for their needs. Because there is significant room for improvement in workers’ health (e.g., anemia is prevalent), and improved health is not just a benefit to workers but also facilitates greater productivity, this project combines the expertise of the three partner organizations to improve worker health and factory outcomes. Read More...

Evidence of Change In Gender Equality and Women‘s Empowerment in the Balkans 2005-2012

This is a report about CARE’s work to advance gender equality in the Balkans and what we have achieved over the past seven years. Our goal is to give account and to demonstrate our commitment to change the lives of the people we serve. We want to illustrate the real life impact of the work we do with our partners and to document the process, methods and the tools used. We want to show that what we and partners have achieved, is relevant to the regional context and that our approaches and methodologies make a demonstrable difference. We also want to learn from our challenges and limitations, and we will use these lessons in our future work. Read More...

Indashyikirwa programme to reduce intimate partner violence in Rwanda: Report of findings from a cluster randomized control trial

Intimate partner violence (IPV), which includes physical and sexual violence, economic abuse and emotional aggression within intimate relationships, is the most common form of violence against women globally. IPV can lead to a wide range of negative health consequences including depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, post-traumatic stress disorder, drug and alcohol abuse, serious injuries, and death. The Indashyikirwa programme in Rwanda sought to reduce experience of IPV among women and perpetration of IPV among men, and also to shift beliefs and social norms that sustain IPV in communities and couples. The programme also strove to support equitable, non-violent relationships, and ensure more supportive and empowering responses to survivors of IPV seeking assistance. The impact evaluation of Indashyikirwa assessed whether and how the programme met these objectives and sought to inform the global best practices in IPV prevention by generating evidence through a rigorous community randomized controlled trial (cRCT).

The quantitative impact evaluation of Indashykirwa took the form of a cRCT with randomization at sector level and two separate evaluation components: (1) a cohort of control and intervention couples interviewed at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months, and (2) a pair of cross-sectional community surveys with control and intervention communities implemented at the beginning of the programme and 24 months later. This quantitative impact evaluation was accompanied by in-depth process evaluation and qualitative research with beneficiaries and programme staff. Read More...

Baseline Survey Report for a WASH project in West Mosul

This is a baseline survey report for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage System" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
There are two priority issues to be addressed by this project: a) significant health risks posed by accumulation of solid waste in key arteries of West Mosul (Cree stream), precluding the effective flow of gray water towards the river as well as damaged pipes which serve to remove black water from residential areas (Al-Thawra neighborhood), and b) limited civic engagement and ownership of residential environment, resulting in poor communal hygiene practices and a high burden on local authorities, which are operating under severely reduced capacity to address needs.
A base-line survey was conducted to identify the current water, hygiene and sanitation conditions in the neighborhood, beneficiaries’ specific needs (disaggregated by men, women, boys and girls) and overall awareness towards water, hygiene and sanitation measures. In order to measure the impact of this projects base line data will be evaluated against end line data collected after project closure. Read More...

Endline evaluation of WASH project in West Mosul, Iraq

This is an endline evaluation for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage Systems" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
This project addressed critical needs for sanitation services in West Mosul, as a direct contribution to enable the affected populations to return home. The project aimed to repair two vital sanitation resources/infrastructure in West Mosul and to support the municipal authorities to build their capacity to eventually recover their costs, once the situation allows. Finally, the project intended to mobilize local communities towards greater ownership for their local environment, to avoid the recurrence of such sanitation risks and maintain a cleaner, more habitable environment. In addition to mitigate a number of health risks related to poor sanitation in urban areas, CARE’s engagement aimed to promote social cohesion and community participation among vulnerable populations affected by the conflict.
The End-line project Evaluation is intended to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements and success of the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men,
women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The Evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations that project staff and the stakeholders might use to improve the design and implementation of other related projects and programs. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

Are there gendered impacts to multi-purpose cash transfers intended to build resilience?

STARTING IN 2017 CARE YEMEN, in partnership with Action Contre la Faim (ACF), implemented a European Union (EU) consortium-funded resilience program in Abyan and Amran governorates. The project used a “Cash Plus” approach, combining ten monthly multi-purpose cash (MPC) transfers with the rehabilitation of vital community assets and livelihoods skills support. The program focused on previously underserved areas to enhance food and nutrition security, promote livelihood recovery and resilience of vulnerable
households, and stimulate local markets. Both interventions were deliberately integrated to enhance resilience building at the household and community levels.
See full evaluation here: http://careevaluations.org/evaluation/the-gendered-dimension-of-multi-purpose-cash-supporting-disaster-resilience/ Read More...

The Gendered Dimension of Multi-Purpose Cash Supporting Disaster Resilience

In 2017, in response to the mounting humanitarian crisis in Yemen, CARE Yemen and Action Contra la Faim (ACF) implemented
a cash transfer program and community asset rehabilitation and skill building programing in the governorates of Abyan
and Amran. This European Union (EU)-funded program integrated these interventions to enhance resilience building at
household and community levels.
The overall objective of this study is to assess the impact of the Multi-Purpose Cash (MPC) on the resilience of households
targeted by the program, with a focus on the experiences of female-headed households, their challenges with increasing
their resilience, and barriers that male-headed households do not face. Read More...

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