English

Rapid Gender Analysis CARE Morocco (English, French)

This analysis is based on a qualitative survey carried out in the field with the various beneficiaries of CARE Morocco's projects. A questionnaire was developed for the occasion and completed through phone calls by the field teams in different intervention areas of CIM. It should be noted that the survey did not focus on a large number of respondents, but rather on qualitative responses with the leaders of CARE Morocco beneficiary groups such as Village Savings and Loans Associations, cooperatives, educators from the education sector, and other partner associations at the local level. Secondary data were also drawn from various national reports and studies, in particular those conducted by the High Commission for Planning and the National Observatory for Human Development. Read More...

Utilizing Cash and Voucher Assistance within Gender-based Violence Case Management to Support Crisis-Affected Populations in Ecuador: Learning Brief

With support from Sweden’s Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Women's Refugee Commission and CARE partnered to advance the Call to Action Roadmap by strengthening the capacity of GBV and CVA service providers in Ecuador to leverage CVA within case management services in the prevention of and response to GBV for crisis-affected populations.

This project, which spanned September to December 2019, serves as an opportunity to model comprehensive GBV case management in the face of high rates of GBV and to influence how humanitarian and development sectors and their practitioners respond to GBV in Ecuador. CVA has not yet been systematically leveraged to meet the needs of GBV survivors and those at risk (GBV clients). Previous work by CARE has focused on GBV prevention and mitigation in support of local government, women’s rights organizations, and civil society strengthening local policies and frameworks; these efforts will be complemented by this project’s focus on GBV response.

This learning brief was made possible by funding support from the Government of Sweden provided through the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. Read More...

Cyclone Idai Response and Recovery Project in Manicaland Province: Final Evaluation Report

CARE International in Zimbabwe and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) Consortium implemented an ECHO funded project in Chipinge and Chimanimani districts. The consortium implemented early recovery interventions, seeking to address the immediate WASH and basic needs of the Cyclone Idai affected populations. The interventions were centered on a community-based integrated approach focusing on building local capacities and empowering communities to regain control over their lives and become more resilient using a robust cash-based component. The project is targeting a total of 9 wards in Chimanimani and Chipinge districts. The project also implemented integrated WASH support interventions in 2 wards in Chipinge district and 1 ward in Chimanimani district whilst implementing the Multi-Purpose Cash Transfer project in 4 wards in Chimanimani district.

The eleven-month project (1 May 2019 to 30 March 2020) aimed to respond to the urgent needs of vulnerable populations through integrated WASH, food security and livelihoods assistance. The overall objective of the project is to provide immediate access to integrated WASH and food security and livelihoods support to the cyclone-affected population.

The consortium conducted an internal final evaluation survey in ward 1 & 4 of Chipinge district and wards 10, 13, 14, 16, 17 & 21 of Chimanimani district for all the interventions to facilitate evidence-based monitoring and evaluation as well as to match targets with the expected project outcomes. The results will be used to draw lessons learnt for future programming. This survey adopted a quantitative and qualitative methodology. A survey questionnaire with close ended questions administered through KoBo collect. Qualitatively, Focus group Discussions with project beneficiaries and Key Informant interviews were sources of data for this assignment. A review of project documents was also done in assessing the intervention. In selecting project beneficiaries to engage in the end line survey, proportional stratified random sampling was employed.

Acknowledgements
The compilation of the project evaluation report was made possible by individuals who dedicated their valuable time. Sincere gratitude to the CARE International and International Rescue Committee (IRC) project staff for their tireless efforts throughout the course of the evaluation. Appreciation goes to the recruited enumerators who participated actively in the collection and processing of the survey data. Special mention also goes to the project staff and managers for the administrative and logistical support during the exercise. The respondents (Cyclone Response and Recovery Project beneficiaries) in Chipinge and Chimanimani are specially thanked for their participation as units of analysis for the evaluation, without them the exercise would not have been possible. Special mention also goes to the CARE & IRC Monitoring and Evaluation unit for analysis and report writing. Read More...

Provision of life-saving WASH services for Rohingya Refugees in Bagghona/Potibonia (Camp 16), Ukhiya Upazila, Cox’s Bazar District: END LINE SURVEY REPORT

Provision of life-saving WASH services to the Rohingya refugee and host population project for Ukhia Upazila, Cox's Bazar district was implemented in Moynarghona (camp 16) by CARE Bangladesh with funding from UNICEF for twelve (12) months (February, 2019 to February, 2020). The goal of the project was to improve the quality of integrated WASH service delivery to support the well-being of children under 5 years, women, girls, men, boys the elderly and persons with disability in emergency situation. The project targeted 21,883 refugees (52% women and 48% men) with water, sanitation and hygiene promotion interventions.

CARE conducted the midterm assessment in February 2020. The survey involved both quantitative and qualitative data collection tools and approaches. The samples were drawn systematically, with the sample size determined following most common statistical formula. A total of 300 respondent/households from camp 16 participated and the data collection. The questionnaires were uploaded in tablets with KoBo data collection application for accuracy and timeliness.

The objectives of the study are as follows:
- To understand water access situation for the beneficiary households in the camp 16.
- To know the sanitation status and use by households in the camp 16.
- To identify current Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) of targeted respondent on water sanitation and hygiene practices.
- To identify water, sanitation and hygiene challenges for the households in camp 16. Read More...

Final Evaluation Multi-stakeholder Model for Ending Gender-Based Violence Project Kayah

The “Multi-Stakeholder Model for Ending Gender-based Violence (GBV)” project in Kayah State involves collaborating with a range of stakeholders to put in place a model designed to prevent and respond to GBV in Kayah state. This new phase of the project, started in 2018, intervened in 92 villages belonging to three townships: Loikaw, Demoso and Phruso, with a total target population of 56.863. The methodology employed a mixed-methods approach, with qualitative data collection through KIIs and FGDs and quantitative data, in the form of household surveys.

The overall objectives of the end of project evaluation are:
• To determine the project’s achievements of its objectives and outcomes.
• To identify intended and unintended outcomes, best practices, lessons learned and recommendations to improve future programming in terms of sustainability. Read More...

Uganda COVID-19 RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS

The novel corona virus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic has been widely reported to have distinct gendered implications in countries around the world.1 This rapid gender analysis (RGA) seeks to explore the implications of COVID 19 in specific areas in northern Uganda to inform current CARE Uganda programming in the region, as well as to serve as reference to any other stakeholders working in the area and with similar target groups. The specific locations this RGA covers are: Omugo settlement, Palabek
settlement, Gulu municipality, Arua municipality, Moyo district and Lamwo district.

This study looks at how COVID 19 is affecting men, women, boys and girls, from refugee and non-refugee backgrounds, in the urban, rural and settlement contexts. It follows earlier RGAs2 conducted prior to the outbreak of the pandemic and seeks to identify where there have been changes of note as a result of the pandemic. On this basis, it provides a number of recommendations to donors and for implementing organisations. Read More...

MALAWI COVID-19 RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus has had a devastating impact globally. While WHO declared COVID-19 as a world pandemic on 30th January 2020, Malawi declared a state of disaster on 20th March 2020 and this was followed with some restrictions including closure of schools. While countries in Southern Africa have imposed lockdowns and other restrictions, as of 7th May Malawi was yet to go on lockdown, which was stopped through a court decision. Malawi is in an election period for fresh presidential elections and with the campaign period officially opened, observance of COVID-19 safety and preventive measures will be a challenge.

Global research findings have shown that COVID-19 has significant social and economic impact on people, especially those living in poverty-stricken countries. Malawi is at more risk due to other significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis.

For women and girls, the impacts can be much higher due to their social responsibilities as primary caregivers, coupled with childcare and nutrition and farm work. Further a majority of health care workers are female (especially nurses). In Malawi, the nursing profession is dominated by female nurses of which 91.5% are professional and 84.7% are associates . With the Covid 19 response, there is also an increased risk of exposure to the infection for health care workers, particularly if health care services are not provided with adequate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE).
Read More...

Gender Implications of Cash Transfers in Malawi

The government of Malawi operates a national safety net program targeting the poorest 10% of the population with unconditional cash transfers and the next poorest 15% with conditional cash transfers through a Cash for Work (CfW) program and vouchers for subsidized agricultural inputs. In 2019 the Government, with support from development partners, has started implementation of an ultra-poor graduation program in nine districts which support ultra-poor households with livelihood grants and complementary services. This safety net is designed to quickly scale to more people or to provide more money to existing participants in case of emergencies.
CARE Malawi set out to identify the gendered implications of this cash programming and how participants’ experiences of cash transfers affected gender equality. To do so, CARE used a combination of literature review and primary data collection with stakeholder consultations, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions (FGDs) at national, district, and community levels. Because of the large-scale cash response to Cyclone Idai in 2019—largely operated through international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)—the study also compared gendered impacts of the government program and NGO humanitarian response. Read More...

West Africa COVID-19 RGA May 2020

As of mid-April 2020, the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Africa is relatively low. That said, there has only been limited testing in Africa, leading many experts to be concerned that Africa could still experience outbreaks on, or beyond, the scale experienced in other regions. Governments are imposing restrictions on movement to reduce the risk of potential outbreaks, and this is directly impacting the ability of humanitarian actors to provide necessary assistance. At the same time, some governments, notably the governments of Mali and Niger, are also expanding their safety nets to help people respond to COVID-19 and its impacts.
CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis draws from CARE’s deep experience in the region, and from interviews with 266 people across 12 countries. It points to serious ongoing economic, health, and financial impacts that will be especially severe for women. It also paints a mixed picture of impact on women’s rights. Special concern is paid to encroaching limitations to women’s access to resources, as well as to their representation and participation in formal decision-making; increased incidents of gender-based violence. These worrying
observations are accompanied by hopeful examples of women leading the response to the COVID-19 crisis and finding ways to negotiate equitable relationships with men in their communities, as well as with their husbands/male partners at home. Read More...

The COVID-19 Outbreak and Gender: Regional Analysis and Recommendations from Asia and the Pacific

In March 2020, emerging gender impacts and trends were highlighted in an Advocacy Brief developed by GiHA resulting in key recommendations. Good practices from across the Asia Pacific Region have seen these recommendations being put into action and six weeks on, due to the scale and rapidly changing nature of the pandemic, it was seen as crucial to continue to document evidence of gender impacts across Asia Pacific and to update analysis and recommendations. Read More...

Filter Evaluations