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A decade of results in Social Transformation for Pastoralist Women and Girls

CARE Ethiopia has spent the last 25 years working to better understand the lives of pastoralist communities in Ethiopia and how best to work alongside them for sustainable development. In the past decade alone, CARE Ethiopia has undertaken several analyses - studies, evaluations and assessments - that have provided valuable insight into how best to support pastoralists (women, men, girls and boys) to build a sustained quality of life. Pastoralists in Ethiopia are found in seven regions including Afar, Somali, SNNP, Oromia, Diredawa, Benshangul Gumuz and Gambella Regional States.

CARE has been at the forefront of encouraging a change in thinking in Ethiopia acknowledging that pastoralism should be regarded as a viable and economically effective livestock production system, and increasing awareness that widespread policies and practices are needed to reverse historical marginalization and address the now disproportionate levels of poverty and vulnerability faced by many pastoralist communities. Read More...

A Decade of Results in Social Transformation for Chronically Food Insecure Rural Women

CARE Ethiopia recognizes that gender-transformative approaches are ambitious, and context-specific, and that change is an incremental process instead of an endpoint, 4 but critical pause points to reflect on learning are key, and thus this document captures the critical knowledge and results CARE Ethiopia has identified over the past decade relevant to their first impact group “Chronically Food Insecure Rural Women” (CFIRW). Read More...

A Decade of Results in Social Transformation for Urban Female Youth

In Ethiopia, ensuring that both women and girls participate in and provide leadership through the urbanization process
is key and can only be accomplished by removing economic and socio- cultural barriers. Evidence from a series of
independent studies funded by USAID, the World Bank and the UNDP in 2017-2018 clearly show that urbanization and
industrialization processes in Ethiopia must be gender responsive in order to deliver sustainable outcomes.
CARE Ethiopia would challenge this and state that it must be gender transformative. For CARE Ethiopia this means
ensuring that: urban girls and women are empowered to equally access economic and social opportunities and
services; institutions become more responsive to the specific and contextual needs and priorities of urban girls and
women and with a focus to understand the heterogeneity of women and girls and their specific vulnerabilities, and that
socio-cultural norms and practices should promote gender equality. CARE Ethiopia’s Theory of Change for resource poor
urban females (see Figure 2), moves beyond individual self-improvement, towards transforming the power dynamics
and structures that served historically to reinforce gendered inequalities in urban communities. Read More...

Nourishing the Future Project: Baseline Study

Conceptually the "Nourishing the Future" project is positioned in the Cargill - CARE alliance with the “purpose to contribute to food and nutrition security in sustainable environmental conditions, while ensuring that farmers (men and women) and their families, obtain an improvement in their livelihoods and income.”

The conceptual orientation enables the project in Guatemala, which begins its Third Phase, to generate conditions, through the development of skills and competences in families and communities participating in the project, the development of resilience to face the effects of climate change. It seeks sustainable long-term changes so that families living in extreme poverty surpass their current state. Its main topic of work and intervention "income generation through the development of agricultural value chains (mini vegetables: green beans and blackberries) and micro entrepreneurs linked to the Cargill supply chain."

This document contains the Baseline Report of the "Nourishing the Future" Project, which begins its Third Phase in Guatemala. Read More...

Increasing Mitigation, Productivity and Adaptation through Crop-Recovery Techniques (IMPACT) II Project

In the 2015 / 2016 season, Malawi experienced severe floods and droughts that occurred as a result of El Nino weather conditions. The Malawi Vulnerability Assessment Committee (MVAC) -composed of the Government, UN agencies and NGOs- forecasted that a minimum of 6.5 million people, or 39 percent of the country's projected population of 16.8 million, would not be able to meet their annual food requirements during the 2016/2017 consumption period. Nsanje, Phalombe and Mulanje are some of the districts that were hit hardest.

CARE Malawi implemented the IMPACT project from August 2016 through July 2017 to help the people from the three districts recover. After closure, USAID’s OFDA extended IMPACT for an additional one year (August 2017-July 2018) with a humanitarian funding of US$1,125,519 to consolidate the gains achieved in the first phase and reach additional households affected by continued dry spells and the Fall Armyworm. CARE subcontracted ADRA (Adventist Development and Relief Agency), an international NGO with experience and presence on the ground, to implement activities of the second phase in Phalombe and Mulanje (as they had in Phase I).

This evaluation aimed to assess the design, performance and impact of the second phase. Read More...

Food and Nutrition Security Programme (FNSP) in Malawi (2015 – 2022): Midline Evaluation

Over 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger and two billion do not meet their micro nutrient requirements (Global Nutrition Report, 2016). While the global starving population has gone down in recent decades, the number of people suffering from hunger in sub-Saharan Africa today is higher than ever. Malnutrition is particularly prevalent in developing countries, where it has an impact not only upon the development prospects of an entire country, but also of each individual affected. If a child does not receive sufficient nutrients up to its second year, i.e. over its first 1,000 days beginning with the early embryonic phase, the impact on growth, mental faculties and therefore learning and work¬ing potential will endure a lifetime.

This midline survey outlines important information to understand whether the project is on track. The overall objective was improving the nutrition situation of women of reproductive age (15-49) and children under two (6-23 months) in Dedza and Salima. This report outlines how well the project is meeting this goal. Read More...

Food and Nutrition Security, Enhanced Resilience: Nutrition Baseline Survey Malawi

Over 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger and two billion do not meet their micro nutrient requirements (Global Nutrition Report, 2016). While the global starving population has gone down in recent decades, the number of people suffering from hunger in sub-Saharan Africa today is higher than ever. Malnutrition is particularly prevalent in developing countries, where it has an impact not only upon the development prospects of an entire country, but also of each individual affected. If a child does not receive sufficient nutrients up to its second year, i.e. over its first 1,000 days beginning with the early embryonic phase, the impact on growth, mental faculties and therefore learning and work¬ing potential will endure a lifetime.

The German Ministry of Economic Co-operation and Development (BMZ) launched an Initiative “On World – No Hunger” to improve food and nutrition security (https://www.bmz.de/webapps/hunger/index.html#/de). Within this initiative GIZ implements the program “Food and nutrition security, enhanced resilience” in 11 countries in Africa and Asia.

The project‘s main target group includes women of childbearing age, pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers and infants. The project‘s objective is to improve the nutritional situation of approximately 880000 women, 235000 young children and 4.000 households. Structural measures to combat hunger and malnutrition, particularly among mothers and young children, are one of the most effective ways of investing in the future of a society. Read More...

Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) Phase-III Final Evaluation Report

Bangladesh is frequently cited as one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. Considering these scenarios of climate change risks and as an initiative to address the effects of climate change, CARE International in Bangladesh implemented the project “Where the Rain Falls (WtRF)”. Generously funded by the Prince Albert II Foundation, WtRF Phase III aimed at improving the resilience of targeted vulnerable and marginalized communities to the impacts of increasing variability of rainfall patterns by promoting CARE’s SuPER (Sustainable, Profitable, Equitable and Resilient) agriculture approach through community based adaptation. This intervention was designed building on earlier phases of Where the Rain Falls project (Phase I & II).

The main objective of this evaluation is to critically review program performance based on the indicators set out in the logical framework. The project is also keen to know how it is helping communities (especially those who are rain fed farmers) to address climatic vulnerabilities in a gender friendly manner. As the project will come to its end in February 2019, CARE Bangladesh planned to have an independent evaluation to see the results in comparison with the baseline. Read More...

Souqona Project: Midterm Evaluation

Souqona is a five years project that was launched in April 2016, as part of the program “Palestinian Farmers Connecting to Markets” launched by the Australian Government, which constitutes the third phase of the Australian Middle East NGO Cooperation Agreement (AMENCA) programme in the oPt. Souqona aims at increasing income, agency, and market opportunity for Palestinian Farmers through growth in pro-poor agribusiness and market development. The project is seeking to better connect women and men Palestinian vegetables, dairy and seed farmers to markets. It is implemented in 23 locations in three governorates located in the Northern Areas of West Bank (Nablus, Jenin, and Tubas).

Advance Consulting Services was commissioned to undertake a midterm review of the project to determine the relevance, efficiency, achievement of results, and sustainability of the first phase of the project that will end in March 20191. Read More...

INCOME, AGENCY AND OPPORTUNITY FOR PALESTINIAN FARMERS: SOUQONA PROJECT BASELINE ASSESSMENT

The Souqona project was launched in April 2016, with funds from the Australian Government as part of the program “Palestinian Farmers Connecting to Markets,” which constitutes the third phase of the Australian Middle East NGO Cooperation Agreement (AMENCA) program in the occupied Palestinian territory. This project is implemented by a consortium of three organizations: Care International West Bank & Gaza as the leading party, The Applied Research Institute - Jerusalem (ARIJ), and the International Centre for Agriculture and Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA).

Souqona’s main goal is to increase income, agency, and market opportunity for female and male Palestinian farmers through growth in pro-poor agribusiness and market development.

In order to lay down the benchmarks for project objectives, Care International commissioned Al-Sahel Company for Institutional Development and Communication (Al-Sahel) to conduct a baseline study. Read More...

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