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SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara Regional State

Introduction and Context of the Evaluation
This report refers to the midterm evaluation (MTE) of “SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project” funded by Austrian Development Cooperation through Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and implemented by CARE Ethiopia. The project was commenced in October 2017 and will be implemented through September 2020 in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara National Regional State. With the ultimate impact of “Chronically food insecure households in Belesa Woredas have improved food security and resiliency”, the project was designed and implemented to achieve the following outcomes.
i. Improved access to water resources for domestic consumption and productive use and enhanced and sustainable productivity of land for varied uses
ii. Vulnerable groups empowered to contribute productively in the household and community
iii. Local government capacitated and community empowered to initiate and lead community development and adaptive measures
The purpose of this mid-term evaluation was assessing the degree of success based on the five OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) standard evaluation parameters. Ten selected project intervention Kebeles from the two intervention Woredas were visited in this evaluation process. Participatory and multi-stage evaluation methods, data sources and triangulations were made to analyze the project status and measure the performance. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods were used to collect data from direct project beneficiaries such as chronically food insecure and drought affected people, rural women and girls, persons with disabilities, youth, relevant government sector and administrative offices at various levels and CARE. Overall, household survey was administered on 845 HHs and 14 KII, 21 FGDs, 20 direct observations and 16 in-depth interviews were made. The following description illustrates the summary of key midterm evaluation findings. Read More...

NUTRITION AND HYGIENE: END OF PROJECT REPORT (2013‐2019)

In alignment with USAID’s resilience strategy to mitigate recurrent shocks on vulnerable populations in Mali, the overall goal of the Integrated Rural Program to Improve Nutrition and Hygiene – USAID Nutrition and Hygiene – project (2013‐2019) was to improve the nutritional status of women and children, with a special emphasis on building resilience through the prevention and treatment of undernutrition.
The project – which was implemented by a CARE‐led consortium that included Family Health International (FHI 360), the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and a Malian non‐governmental organization (NGO) called Yam‐Giribolo‐Tumo (YA‐G‐TU) – targeted three regions in Mali: Mopti, Ségou and Koulikoro. These regions are all characterized by drought and climate‐related chronic food insecurity and high acute malnutrition rates. The project was implemented in nine districts across these three regions: Nara (Koulikoro Region), Niono (Ségou Region), Mopti, Bandiagara, Bankass, Tenenkou, Youwarou, Koro and Djenne (Mopti Region). In 2016, the
project received additional funding from Feed the Future to reinforce its agriculture component in the Mopti region.
The project aimed to reach children during the 1,000‐day “window of opportunity” period between conception and the first two years of life through the promotion of community and health sector services, improved agricultural practices, nutrition education and social behavior change communication. Our approach addressed both the immediate causes of malnutrition – such as inadequate dietary intake and infectious diseases, including diarrheal diseases – and the underlying root causes of malnutrition – such as poor hygiene, inadequate sanitation infrastructure and barriers to the access to and consumption of quality, diverse foods. Read More...

Zoghra Camp Multi-Sectorial Need Assessment & FGD Report

The purpose of this report is to pinpoint the main pressing needs of the internally displaced persons (IDPs) who fled from their communities. CARE, through its partner (Ihsan), conducted this needs assessment to capture the situation of the IDPs in two camps in Jarablus, Aleppo governorate from 21st until 23rd of August 2020, in addition to a performed 4 focused group discussions on the 24th of August through CARE team’s site visit as mentioned in the following table and highlight on their needs in terms of shelter, NFI, hygiene, and food to develop the response plan according to the available capacity which can meet the needs of IDPs with high efficiency. Read More...

GEWEP II: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Programme II Final Report

GEWEP II works with and for poor and vulnerable women and girls. More than 8 160 000 women and girls live in our programme areas, and the end programme target is to directly work with 1 022 200.
The main impact is through Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs). The VSLA model came out of a pilot in Niger in the early 90s. Nearly 30 years later, there are more than 6.7 million VSLA members across the globe. Other organisations and governments have adopted CARE’s model, thereby multiplying impact. GEWEP continued to scale up VSLAs, and advocated for governments to recognize the model. The Governments of Burundi, DRC, Niger and Rwanda all recognize the important contribution of VSLAs to women’s economic empowerment, manifested within national strategies, policies and funds.
Women’s economic empowerment opens up for women’s participation. GEWEP supported women to come together and find confidence and common cause through VSLAs. We find VSLA women who actively participate in decision-making in formal structures, and who manage to stay there despite resistance from some men. This is the main success for women’s participation, across countries.
The shrinking space for civil society remains the most difficult challenge. In all countries, CARE’s main approach was to maintain good relations with those that are directly engaging with the field of women’s rights or who control the implementing areas or relevant political processes. This approach was successful in terms of preserving enough working space for CARE, GEWEP partners and other civil society actors working in the same field. Read More...

Final Report On End Line Study of Promoting Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women and Girls in Clothing Industry Project

Employing more than 2.5 million women (60%), the RMG sector in Bangladesh is one of the largest sources of employment for women. CARE Bangladesh and UN Women partnered to undertake the Promoting Women Worker’s Empowerment Project as a 5 months pilot to help workers, particularly women, develop their skills and experience and access leadership opportunities which may lead to career advancement, improved work environment for the workers. The study was undertaken with several objectives- (i) To identify the progress on knowledge, skill and aspiration of women RMG workers in the working factories from the baseline (ii) To identify the initiatives that Management of the working factories are planning for career Advancement for women RMG workers (iii) To examine the appropriateness of the career pathways that was identified in baseline and identify the further recommendations for career Advancement for women RMG workers (iv) Evaluating the project indicators to measure the progress of the project (v) Developing a learning brief on the Project from baseline and end line . Read More...

Mapping Governance Systems in CARE Target Provinces

This report presents the findings of a governance study conducted on behalf of CARE Afghanistan. The aim of the study is to inform the formulation of CARE's governance strategy as components of CARE's recently reviewed overall country strategy. In order to develop a strategy that fits the socio-cultural context and institutional framework set in the provinces CARE operates in, CARE established the need for a structural mapping exercise of governance mechanisms, the systems of power that support and shape it, as well as the role of individual stakeholders. Whilst this report will outline in detail the methods and findings of the study, only its key findings will be transferred into the strategy paper. This serves to ensure that the strategy paper meets the limitations in space typically assigned to documents that are meant to guide senior management and implementation staff alike. Findings in this report will be presented aligned to the three dimensions of CARE's inclusive governance concept.
The study also comprised a second component that turned focus inside, and assessed the capacity of CARE's internal governance structures to accommodate the proposed governance strategy. The findings of this component will be processed in the last chapter of the report. Read More...

Addressing GBV & SRHR Challenges in Bama and Dikwa LGAs in Borno State, Northeast Nigeria

Borno state in Northeast Nigeria has been under frequent attacks in the past decade, which has left several million people insecure, homeless, and without any means of livelihood. Hence, the rate of Gender-based Violence (GBV) continues to increase coupled with lack of awareness and basic infrastructure for promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). To alleviate the challenges faced by several inhabitants of these conflict-affected communities, CARE is implementing a SRHR and GBV project to reach 47,000 vulnerable boys, girls, men and women, living in Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camps and host communities in Bama and Dikwa Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Borno State. This report highlights the current gaps in GBV and SRHR in Bama and Dikwa LGAs to serve as benchmark for measuring progress and guide implementation of the right intervention mix.
In October – November 2019, CARE Nigeria conducted a baseline survey for the project. The study involved administration of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) questionnaires as well as Focus Group Discussions (FGD) and Key Informant Interviews (KII) covering SRHR and GBV to randomly selected men, women, boys and girls in the project communities. Among the interviewed were; community members, representatives of security agencies, camp coordinator and health facility staffs respectively, in Dikwa and Bama LGAs in Borno State. A total of 79 FGDs and 46 KIIs were conducted, in addition to the quantitative survey involving 3,112 participants. Read More...

When Time Won’t Wait: CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis Approach External Evaluation

Humanitarian crises can offer a ‘window of opportunity’ to transform unequal gender relations and shift harmful gender norms. Integration of gender into humanitarian programming ensures that the specific vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys — related to pre-existing gender roles and inequalities, along with the impacts of the crisis — are recognised and addressed.
Sound gender analysis and programming from the outset is critical to effective crisis response in the short-term, and equitable and empowering societal change in the long-term. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) approach and tool, developed during the humanitarian response in Syria in 2013, aims to drive a shift to locally driven and women-centered needs assessment which influences how needs are defined and responses are developed. The approach aims to provide essential information about gender roles and responsibilities, capacities, and vulnerabilities together with programming recommendations in situations where time is of the essence
and resources can be scarce. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to influence humanitarian response, program design and implementation to ensure that it supports not only the immediate needs of women and girls but also upholds their rights. CARE’s RGA has now been used in over 50 crises around the word and is featured as good practice in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action. With rapidly increasing interest in and adoption of CARE’s RGA approach, discussion and questions continue as to whether increased awareness of gender, power and disaggregated data sets are translating into safer, more responsive, and effective aid.
To answer these questions, CARE commissioned an external evaluation to ‘provide an analysis of the effectiveness and influence of the RGA approach on adapting programming to improve gendered outcomes for crises-affected communities.’ The scope of the evaluation was global and focused on rapid gender analyses and related humanitarian programming over the period 2015-2020. Read More...

School Feeding Program Study Report

The Government of Timor-Leste’s school feeding program provides a meal or snack to all students in preschools and basic education (Grades 1-9) throughout the country. In full implementation, this represents providing mostly cooked meals to about one quarter of the population.1 The nationwide School Feeding Program was established by the Government of Timor-Leste (GOTL) in 2005 and has been through several phases of implementation. The Manual which has guided the program implementation since 2013 is in the process of being revised (end of 2019 to early 2020). To support the Timor-Leste government to review and improve the School Feeding Program (SFP), CARE International in Timor-Leste studied the program and commissioned this report with the objectives to review and assess how the program is being implemented as well as gather opinions and suggestions from various stakeholders on how to improve the program. Read More...

HATUTAN COST OF THE DIET STUDY

This report covers the analysis and findings of a Cost of the Diet (CotD) study conducted in the four operational municipalities of the HATUTAN program, namely Ainaro, Ermera, Liquica and Manatuto. The study was commissioned by Mercy Corps Timor-Leste with funding from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The CotD study was presented to the National Institute of Health (INS) for approval prior to implementation.1 The study was designed to answer the following seven key questions:
1. What are the locally available and affordable foods found in each of the HATUTAN municipalities that could be used for nutritious school meals?
2. What is the cost of a nutritious school meal based on locally available foods?
3. What are the recommended foods to purchase, based on the current $0.25 and proposed $0.50 per child per day, to maximize nutrition outcomes?
4. What is the estimated cost of the non-food consumables – such as transportation, soap and firewood – that also need to be covered within the amount budgeted per student per a meal?
5. What is the nutritional value of a locally-sourced school meal?
6. How does the nutritional value of a locally-sourced school meal differ from the currently provided school meal?
7. How does a school meal for a child help close the nutrition gap at the household level? Read More...

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