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Support for Service Delivery Integration- Services (SSDI-Services) Endline

SSDI-Services was the flagship project for USAID/Malawi’s health office. The project was implemented from November 8, 2011 to March 7, 2017 under a cooperative agreement, valued at USD 89 million. Active project implementation occurred over a 4.5-year period from April 2012 to December 2016, with the preceding and following months focused on startup and closeout activities respectively.

SSDI-Services provided financial and technical assistance to the Malawian Ministry of Health (MoH) to deliver, refine, and scale up high-impact interventions contained in the Essential Health Package (EHP). The EHP includes globally proven and cost-effective interventions to address key causes of illness and death in Malawi. SSDI-Services implemented interventions under the following program areas: maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH); family planning (FP); malaria; nutrition; HIV/AIDS; and sanitation and hygiene.

SSDI-Services was implemented by a consortium comprising Jhpiego as lead, CARE, Plan International, and Save the Children. The project focused on increasing access to, and strengthening the delivery of, EHP services both at the health facility and in the community. It leveraged the work of both SSDI-Communication and SSDI-Systems to improve health-seeking behavior and the quality of health services by addressing the informational needs of both service providers and their clients. It also addressed systems issues that may hinder the provision of high-quality Read More...

Udaan II Nepal Final Evaluation

Udaan II “Catching the Missed Opportunity”, funded by the OPEC Fund for International Development, was one of the most important initiatives under the LEAD program of CARE Nepal. The LEAD program envisions education and economic prosperity as an instrument to women and girls’ empowerment, through transforming harmful social norms, building life skills and advocating related policy reforms. Under the LEAD Program, the Udaan initiative provided an intensive, 11-month high-quality condensed curriculum for adolescent girls (Dalit, Muslim and other marginalized groups) aged 9-14 of Kapilvastu District, who were unable to either start or complete primary school. The program also helped them to get enrolled in community schools, named “mother school”, where Udaan graduates continued their higher study. Working together with nine formal mother schools of Krishannagar and Maharajgunj Municipalities of the Kapilvastu district, as well as with the girls and their parents, the Udaan II project focused on addressing the economic factors affecting girls’ families, and the harmful social norms acting as barriers to girls’ education. This helped to create an enabling and safe learning environment for girls, and provided opportunities for livelihood and vocational skill development. The Project was implemented over two years and 10 months (January 2018 to October 2020) by Care Nepal in Krishannagar Rural Municipality, Kapilvastu Municipality and Maharajgunj Rural Municipality of Kapilvastu district in cooperation with local partner Siddhartha Social Development Centre (SSDC).
The objective of the final evaluation study was to measure both the intended Read More...

SUAAHARA II GOOD NUTRITION PROGRAM Annual Survey Year 3

Nepal’s reductions in maternal and child undernutrition since the mid-1990s have been remarkable, but the high burden persists. Among children under five years, 36% are stunted, 10% are wasted, and 27% are underweight. Additionally, 17% of women of reproductive age (WRA, 15-49 years) are underweight while 41% are anemic (Nepal DHS Survey, 2016). The Government of Nepal (GoN) is rolling out the second phase of their national Multi-Sector Nutrition Plan (MSNP), with support of external development partners (EDPs). Suaahara II (SII) is a USAID-funded multisectoral nutrition program, aligned with Nepal’s MSNP, and is being implemented in all communities of 42 of Nepal’s 77 districts from April 2016 to March 2021. SII’s overall aim is to reduce the prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight among children under five years of age and to reduce the prevalence of anemia among WRA and children 6-59 months of age. SII works across thematic areas including nutrition, health and family planning (FP), water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), agricultural/homestead food production (HFP), and governance, using a gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) approach for all interventions.
SII has a large, rigorous monitoring, evaluation, and research system. Annual monitoring surveys, a key component of SII’s monitoring system, primarily serve to monitor progress over time related to key SII inputs, outputs, and outcomes in intervention areas. The first SII annual monitoring survey was conducted between June to September 2017 among a representative sample of households with a child under five years by New ERA, a local survey firm. At the household level, mothers were the primary survey respondents. A primary male (or female, if male unavailable) household decision maker, the youngest child’s grandmother, and an adolescent girl (10-19 years), if residing in the same household, were also interviewed. Data was also collected from Female Community Health Volunteers (FCHVs) and 1 key informant from each health facility in the sampled areas. The household surveys included questions related to exposure, knowledge and practices for each of the thematic areas mentioned above. Anthropometric status was assessed for all female respondents and children. FCHV and health facility surveys collected information on exposure to training, motivation, supervision, and work-related activities. In 2017, the final survey sample included 3,642 households. Read More...

STOP Southeast Asia Impact Reflections

Sexual harassment is any unwanted, unwelcome or uninvited behaviour of a sexual nature which could be expected to make a person feel humiliated, intimidated or offended. Female garment workers experience sexual harassment in their workplace, generally have limited legal protections, lack job security and work in an environment where there is often impunity for the harassment they experience. In Cambodia alone, sexual harassment costs in the garment industry USD $89 million per annum in lost productivity.

After four years of work, independent evaluations found the STOP project had assisted factory management to set up clearer guidelines and mechanisms for dealing with and preventing sexual harassment. It also empowered female workers to be confident to report sexual harassment incidents and become more aware of their rights. Read More...

ENDLINE EVALUATION COVER PAGE Adolescent Empowerment Project (AEP) IN KAJIADO & MUKURU

CARE implemented the Adolescent Empowerment Project (AEP) in Kenya, funded through the Patsy Collins Trust Fund Initiative from 2015 to 2020. The project aimed to empower adolescent girls and boys from chronically insecure households to fully exploit their potential, take advantage of opportunities, and fulfil their aspirations. Over a 5-year implementation period, the project targeted adolescents (aged 10-19) in urban Mukuru (within Nairobi county) and rural Kajiado county with a suite of activities and services delivered through partners Hope Worldwide Kenya (HWWK) and Neighbors Initiative Alliance (NIA). Inputs were designed to expand life choices and empower participants to become engaged citizens and include activities on leadership skills development, adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ARSH), economic empowerment, ICT skills, and quality education.
This report is 70 pages long. Read More...

Improving Sexual and Reproductive Health through Reducing Early Marriage in Remote Ethnic Communities in Sekong Province, Lao PDR

Lao PDR has the highest rates of early marriage in the region, even though the law sets the age of marriage at 18. Young brides are more vulnerable to sexual abuse from their partners and to unintended pregnancy. Lao PDR has the highest adolescent pregnancy rate in the region due to early marriage, limited knowledge of sexual & reproductive health, and limited access to appropriate services. The overall goal of the project is improved sexual reproductive and maternal health (SRMH) in remote ethnic communities in Sekong Province. The action contributes to reduced child marriage, as well as providing SRMH knowledge and developing youth friendly health infrastructure. The action engages the whole community to reflect on harmful traditions and their negative impact on the development of girls, and to create an enabling environment for girls. CARE also provides organizational and technical capacity development to local governments and partners to enable them to deliver key messages on the link between child marriage and pregnancy risk to the targeted ethnic minorities.
This report is 17 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study on “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” Project

In response to the health and protection needs of the Rohingya refugees and the host communities in Cox ́s Bazar, CARE is implementing the project “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” with funding support by German Federal Foreign Office. This is a two year project targeting Rohingya refuges of camp 11, 12, 15 and 16 and vulnerable host communities of Jaliapalong union for GBV and SRH services.
To achieve improved sexual and reproductive health, GBV survivor support and protection from GBV of Rohingya Refugees in Cox ́s Bazar in Bangladesh, this project works across three outcomes. Firstly general and sexual and reproductive (SRH) health services will be provided through decetralised health centers which will rove around the target areas to provide services to people at their doorsteps. Improved Menstrual Hygiene management (MHM) is the second outcome of this project. There is an absence of space for washing and drying menstrual hyiene materials, leading women and girls to risk their health by drying their materials indoors. Through this project, therefore, two MHM spaces will be constructed next to CARE’s existing women and girls’ safe spaces (WGSS) in camps 12 and 16. The construction will be accompanied with training to ensure that the spaces are used appropriate. The third project outcome focuses on prevention of and response to gender-based violence. Services include psychosocial counselling, referral of GBV survivors, life-skills training, information and awareness-raising and recreational activities. These activities are complemented by community outreach activities, conducted through Rohingya volunteers, to ensure that the communities know about and can access the WGSS, and challenging harmful social norms associated with GBV. Community outreach will take place in camps 12 and 16 amongst refugee populations.
This report is 22 pages long. Read More...

Women’s involvement in coffee agroforestry value- chains Financial training, village savings and loans associations, and decision power in Northwest Vietnam

Colleagues in Vietnam and at CCAFS and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) carried out some research on our work in the coffee value chain (TEAL).

This study assessed VSLA impacts and related training on gender equality and women’s access to coffee markets in an ongoing coffee- project in northwest Vietnam.

Applying the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI), women rated perceptions of their decision-making over a range of 18 tasks related to household and agricultural responsibilities and use of income and social activities (over 18 months). There were improvements in decision-making power in categories with previously low participation and increased sharing of domestic responsibilities (biggest gains were decision-making over large purchases and use of income). Also found that husbands to women in the study embraced more equal sharing of responsibility and decision-making with their wives.
This report is 40 pages long. Read More...

DEC Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I & Phase II Final Evaluation Report

Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) has been implementing a 25-month program of DEC-funded Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I and Phase II, running from 1 October 2018 through 31 October 2020. The project aims to help secure livelihoods recovery for the most vulnerable households in Central Sulawesi who were affected by the major earthquake and tsunami in 2018.
In DEC Phase 1, the emergency response was delivered in the sector of WASH and Shelter to support the disaster-affected people. In DEC Phase 2, the recovery period focused in WASH and livelihood programs, particularly for female-headed households. In both phases, YCP was working in collaboration with PKPU/ HI, as local implementing partner. Overall, the DEC provided supports with the amount of about USD 1 million for 25-months project period and reached to more than 28,000 people.
This evaluation is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the project’s achievements, lessons learned, and recommendations for future actions for similar project within YCP. The evaluation focused on research questions that assess criteria in Core Humanitarian Standards: Appropriateness & relevance; Effectiveness; Timeliness; Strengthening of local actors; Communication, participation and feedback; Coordination with and complementarity to other actors; Continuous learning and improvements; Support for staff; and Management of resources, as well as assessing cross cutting Issues, consists of: Gender sensitivity; Social inclusion and; Accountability.
This report is 54 pages long. Read More...

Multiagency and Multisectoral Rapid Need Assessment in Raya Kobo, Raya Alamata, Raya Azebo, Chercher, Wajirat and Ofla Woredas of North Wollo and South Tigray Zones

2020 was ascribed as a record year of disasters by the local communities in the locations covered by this assessment; Raya Kobo, Raya Alamata, Raya Azebo, Raya Chercher, Wajirat and Ofla woredas in North Wollo and South Tigray. The multiple, complex and frequent hazards have proved relentless; COVID 19, Desert Locusts and conflict have exhausted the coping capacity and challenged the resilience of the local communities.
The Tigray conflict erupted at the backdrop of the devastating impact of COVID- 19 and locust infestation crisis. To make the matter worse, the conflict erupted in the middle of the harvest season, effectively halting attempts to gather the remains of already depleted crops. The longer- term effects of, which will impact communities for years to come.
Since there was already an influx of IDPs from the 2017 ethnic conflicts around the country, the region experienced in hosting IDP, but on this occasion, the numbers of incoming families have doubled and, in some cases, trebled, according to reports from the local Woreda authorities responsible for registering such movement. Thus, these two zones are under protracted and complex crisis that have rocked the livelihood base of the communities and put their lives into a very precarious situation.

Objectives of the Assessment
a) Assessing the current humanitarian situation and identify response requirements and preferences1 for IDPs as well as host community members with humanitarian support needs
b) Understand the response capacity and preparedness of partners operating in Amhara and Tigray and to act in a complementary manner to rescue the lives and livelihoods of the
communities and IDPs,
c) To be ready for humanitarian support in line with humanitarian principles and NGOs code of conduct, and
d) Understand current humanitarian concerns of the targeted areas in both regional states
(Amhara and Tigray) and act to raise these concerns with potential benevolent donors within the country and overseas, to generate funds

This report is 43 pages long. Read More...

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