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Improving Adolescent Reproductive Health and Nutrition through Structural Solutions in West Hararghe Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia Abdiboru Project Final

The final evaluation is divided into three parts, qualitative, quantitative and triangulation final reports.
Triangulation: this project objective was to empower girls through improved reproductive health, nutrition, and education in rural West Hararghe, Ethiopia. It examines the effectiveness of two different set of interventions- a combination of structural and induvial interventions Vs structural, individual, and community level interventions against a control group. Ethiopia is one of the countries in the world characterized by high level of early marriage. In most cases, when girls marry, they move to their husband’s household and are socially isolated, work long hours, and have very little say in decisions that affect them. Keeping girls in schools is essential to their future wellbeing, and Ethiopia has made significant progress on its commitments. But in rural areas, it has been difficult to achieve high levels of secondary schooling for girls. Nutrition is deeply interconnected with reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health. Household gender dynamics often mean that girls are more food-insecure than their male counterparts. Female adolescents, those living in a household with food insecurity and high dependency ratio are more likely to suffer from household food allocation. Schooling, early marriage and nutritional status and overall girls’ empowerment are interrelated maters. They have a complex relationship one affecting the other significantly.

Addressing the issues in package is believed to bring the maximum benefit in improving the social, health and development of adolescent girls and thus empowering them in multiple dimensions. Yet programs that focus sectorally, targeting health indicators of women and girls while ignoring the broader context that radically constricts their choices, have not generated significant or sustained impact over the long term. The structural context in which girls live is the main driver of their reproductive, maternal, and nutritional health and educational opportunities. Read More...

Restoring Water Supply System and improved Sanitation and Hygiene Practices in West Mosul, Iraq – Phase III Endline

With funding support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Czech Republic (MoFA Czech), CARE implemented a six-months project aimed at restoring water supply system and improved sanitation and hygiene practices in West Mosul, Iraq. The project is implemented in West Mosul in Al-Zanjili, Al-Ghazlani, Rajam Hadeed and Al-Jadeed neighbourhoods targeting IDPs, host communities and returnees with 47,500 direct beneficiaries. Through the approval of a modification in October 2020 the scope of work was expanded on both the environmental sanitation and water rehabilitation components of the project, increasing the project target population by an additional 25,000 beneficiaries, making the total number of the beneficiaries 72,500.
The endline evaluation seeks to analyze the endline values for key water, hygiene and sanitation project indicators planned in the proposal and to assess the impact and effectiveness the project, relevance and sustainability. The study used a mixed methodology, including a quantitative survey on 560 respondents in Al-Ghazlani (271) and Al-Zanjili neighbourhoods (289), and qualitative interviews with key informants from the neighbourhoods and the stakeholders from the government [27 pages]. Read More...

CYCLONE IDAI RESPONSE AND RECOVERY PROJECT IN MANICALAND PROVINCE: CHIPINGE AND CHIMANIMANI DISTRICTS Baseline

CARE International in Zimbabwe and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) Consortium are currently visible in Chipinge and Chimanimani districts through -support from ECHO. The consortium is currently implementing early recovery interventions which seek to address the immediate WASH and basic needs of the Cyclone Idai affected populations. The interventions are centred on a community-based integrated approach focused on building local capacities and empowering communities to regain control over their lives and become more resilient using a robust cash-based component. Targeting a total of 9 wards in Chimanimani and Chipinge districts, CARE and IRC consortium are maximizing the geographic reach and multi-sectoral coverage of the Action using a harmonized, closely coordinated, gender-sensitive consortium approach. The project is targeting households which were affected by the Cyclone Idai disaster, those whose shelter was completely or partially destroyed. Other vulnerability attributes such as elderly people, People with Disabilities, pregnant and lactating women, child headed households, and Internally Displaced People among other attributes were used for appropriate targeting.
The consortium is currently providing community-driven livelihoods support in four targeted wards through a Cash for Work program that was designed to rebuild community productive assets. The project is also implementing integrated WASH support interventions in 2 wards in Chipinge district and 1 ward in Chimanimani district whilst implementing the Multi-Purpose Cash Transfer project in 4 wards in Chimanimani district. The consortium conducted a baseline survey in both districts for all the interventions underway to facilitate evidence based monitoring and evaluation as well as to match targets with the expected project outcomes. The results will be used for both guiding project implementation and determining project impact by providing the datum for measurement [23 pages].
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Taking Care of Our Mountains

On Friday December 11, we celebrated International Mountain Day, which was designated in 2003 by the United Nations to bring attention to the vital importance of conserving mountain ecosystems and the critical environmental services they provide.
To highlight the importance of mountain ecosystems and uplift the voices of women, girls, and other marginalized groups that suffer disproportionately from their destruction, we are sharing a report that outlines some of CARE’s initiatives to protect mountains. Developed in collaboration with and under the leadership of CARE Peru, this report highlights inclusive and innovative solutions for mountain conservation by showcasing three case studies from CARE Peru, CARE Ecuador, and CARE Nepal and examples from CARE Tanzania and CARE Guatemala. [20 pages]. Read More...

The Impact of COVID-19 on Women in Democratic Republic of Congo

Evidence worldwide indicates that women are disproportionately affected by the health and socio-economic impacts of intervention
measures applied for the control of COVID-19. Women make up the majority of the informal labour sector and are more likely to suffer job losses or reduced income as a result of closed borders, markets and shops, and restricted movement. Sexual and reproductive health services are often the first to face restrictions in terms of availability and access. School closures place an additional burden on women, who take on childcare responsibilities, including ensuring adequate nutrition. Girls who cannot go to school are at increased risk of sexual violence, pregnancy, and early marriage - a trend that was widely observed in areas affected by Ebola during the 2014-2016 epidemic in West Africa. Risks are exacerbated for women and girls living in the poorest households in remote rural areas.
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in March 2020, mixed methods data produced by the Social Sciences Analytics Cell (CASS) and its partners presents a dynamic where pre-existing disparities between men and women in terms of health, social protection and economic status are being exacerbated by the outbreak and its response. This report presents an integrated multidisciplinary analysis of the impact of COVID-19 and its response on women and girls in the DRC, highlighting changes that have occurred since the beginning of the outbreak. The objective of this report is to provide evidence to support decision-making for strategies to respond to the outbreak to ensure that the health, protection and economic security of women and girls is prioritised. Read More...

CARE Mali Harande FY20 Participants Based Survey PaBS Annual Report

Harande program, implemented the annual monitoring survey through the M&E Unit and Program team supported by the CARE USA Regional M&E Advisor. The methodology is based on the Participants Based Survey (PaBS survey) guidelines expressed in Feed the Future PABS guideline1. It has been conducted using the latest BHA participants-based survey methodology guidance. All fourteen (14) annual survey indicators have been computed using weighting procedures. Except for, gross margin, value of incremental and yield indicators that used more complex formulas, standard errors and confidence intervals have been established for the remaining indicators. FY20 Data collection has been made during the period of July 15 - 29, 2020 and methodology comply with the PaBS FtF guideline as recommended by BHA. The PaBS have been implemented in the following four (4) communes: Dourou, Dandoli, Douentza and Koubewel Koundia, and a total of 48 villages have been reached through these communes for data collection.

A total of 1,733 participants have been sampled for this PaBS. Within them 11% refused the survey and 72% were female. That bring the total participant who responded to the survey in all the frames without double counting to 1,529. Participants who overlap between frames during the survey were counted once. It appears that 28% of participants were youth. Out of a total of 1,529 interviewed respondents 1,265 come from households and 18% of them were household heads. The average size of households was 9 members (the number varies from a minimum of 2 to a maximum of 35 household members). [59 pages]. Read More...

Emergency Response After Action Review for CARE Ghana’s Response to the 2019 Floods in Upper East Region Final Evaluation

Torrential rains in the Upper East region of Ghana occurred from the 2nd to the 15th of October 2019. The continuous rains led to flooding in all the fifteen (15) administrative districts/municipalities which resulted in the collapse of buildings, deaths and displacement of a sizeable percentage of the population . The most affected districts were; Builsa North, Kassena Nankana Municipal, Bongo, Kassena Nankana West, Builsa South, Tempane and Talensi .
CARE International in Ghana, collaborated with government agencies namely National Disaster Management Organization (NADMO), National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE), Ghana Health Service (GHS) and Information Service Department in the region to respond to the emergency. Key interventions implemented as part of the emergency response were the distribution of food and non-food relief items, cash disbursements, Covid-19 risk communication to victims in four worst affected districts. The districts are; Bongo, Talensi Builsa North and Kassena Nankana Municipal. The relief items included; rice, oil, gari, sugar, Winimix, maize, beans, fish aqua tabs, sanitary pads, buckets bar soap and cloth. Additionally, cash to the tune of GHC 814.00 per flood affected household was disbursed through mobile money system and physical distribution to a total of 700 flood victims across the four districts in three tranches. The cash transfers were meant to enable beneficiaries rebuild after the disaster [12 pages]. Read More...

THE EMERGENCY MOBILE HEALTH, NUTRITION & PROTECTION PROJECT IN EASTERN EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN Final Evaluation

This report is presented by Adroit Consult International following a successful evaluation of the Emergency Mobile Health, Nutrition & Protection Project in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan. This main objective of the endline evaluation was to provide information on the impact of the 3 year integrated Health, Nutrition and Gender Based Violence (GBV) project and also measure results at the outcome and impact levels. The evaluation was conducted with project stakeholders such as; Community leaders, Households of beneficiaries, Individual women and men, Children under five, Health workers, Government officials, CSO/NGO partners among others, and covered the areas of Lopa Lafon and Ikotos. The evaluation reached a total of 287 respondents in project implementation areas [27 pages]. Read More...

Ghana Strengthening Social Accountability Mechanism (GSAM) final

USAID/Ghana contracted Social Impact, Inc. to conduct an impact evaluation of USAID’s Ghana Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) program, which aims to increase accountability of local District Assemblies in Ghana. This randomized-controlled trial, impact evaluation tests the effect of two distinct efforts to increase accountability and improve service delivery outcomes at the district level. One-hundred and fifty of Ghana’s districts were matched and randomized into one of three groups: a top-down treatment group that received performance audits conducted by the central government Ghana Audit Service (GAS); a bottom-up treatment group that received civil-society organization (CSO) led scorecard campaigns; and a control group that did not receive either intervention.
Through surveys with citizens, local administrators, and local politicians and through a review of administrative data, we find that both CSO and GAS programming generally reduce citizen satisfaction with projects and services, but this is largely driven by districts that receive negative audit reports. That citizens are correctly attributing bad audit performance to poor-performing DAs is encouraging from the point of view of accountability. This progress with citizens has not, however, translated into many substantial changes in how administrators or politicians manage projects or project budgets. Neither GAS nor CSO programming improve transparency or corruption. GAS programming does reduce the incidence of partisan manipulation of public resources by politicians, and it also increases the perception of partisan manipulation among administrators. This is consistent with GAS sensitizing administrators to partisan manipulation and reducing its actual incidence among DA politicians.
CSO programming increases citizen-reported consultation on recent development, and administrators in CSO districts spend, on average, three hours more responding to constituents. Reasons that the intervention did not have a stronger impact on district officials includes (1) natural limits to the number of citizens reached by the intervention, (2) limited district government capacity and frequent turnover, and (3) local government dependence on federal budget transfers. Read More...

Multi-sectoral life-saving project Sexual reproductive maternal health, WASH and protection services for the crisis affected population in Iraq Baseline

With funding support from the German Federal Foreign Office(GFFO), CARE implements a 21 months multisectoral live-saving project: sexual reproductive maternal health, WASH and protection services to crisis affected population in Iraq: Anbar governorate (Districts of Fallujah and Khalidiya), Ninewa governorate (West Mosul) and Duhok governorate (Mamrashan IDP camp) with 21,386 direct beneficiaries aiming at:1) Quality essential SRMH services will be provided in areas of origin (Fallujah, Khalidiya and West Mosul) through strengthened health facilities, enhanced awareness and mobilization of communities and reinforced referral mechanisms. 2) WASH needs of crisis affected IDPs in Mamrashan camp will be met through care and maintenance of WASH facilities, water quality tests, hygiene promotion, solid waste management and establishment of gender balanced WASH committees. 3) Protection response services including, psycho-social support (PSS), dignity kit support will be provided to vulnerable women, girls, men and boys in Fallujah, Khalidiya, West Mosul and Mamrashan IDP camp. [35 pages]. Read More...

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