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Inter-agency Rapid Gender Analysis and GBV Assessment – DRC Refugee Influx, Uganda

Overstretched and underfunded, the humanitarian response for the influx of DRC refugees into Uganda is struggling to meet the large basic needs. This Inter-Agency Rapid Gender Analysis and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) assessment was conducted with the objective of understanding the gender dimensions of the crisis, and needs and vulnerabilities of the refugees in order to inform a more gender responsive humanitarian response. In particular, it aimed to identify the specific GBV risks and vulnerabilities facing the affected population, and provide targeted recommendations to both CARE and other humanitarian actors on how to address these gaps and vulnerabilities.
GBV is a daily reality in Eastern DRC – both within and outside of the ongoing conflicts. Sexual violence has been a longstanding weapon of war used by parties to the conflicts and, increasingly, this sexual violence has extended through to every-day perpetration by civilians. This violence is situated within a society with deeply rooted discriminatory gender norms, in which women suffer entrenched inequality in all spheres of life and where a man’s worth is largely based on his capacity to provide for and protect his family. The sustained conflicts within the country have resulted in decreasing opportunities for men to perform this role, similarly so in displacement in Uganda, where livelihood opportunities are severely diminished.
This assessment found that in conflict, in transit, and in displacement in Uganda, the Congolese refugee population is facing numerous highly traumatic forms of human rights abuses, including various forms of GBV. In the conflict in DRC, sexual violence is systematically perpetrated against women and girls; and kidnapping, physical assault, torture and massacres are used against men and boys. Women and girls often face a compounded risk of additional sexual violence during flight. Read More...

Key findings from CARE’s rapid gender analysis in Rhino and Imvepi settlements, March 2017

CARE has conducted a rapid gender analysis (RGA) during the week of 12th March 2017 in Rhino and the newly opened Imvepi settlements in the Arua district of the West Nile region of Uganda. The following are a set of initial findings pulled out of the analysis to support engagement with ECHO regarding potential work in the West Nile region.

Methodology: RGA can provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis by examining the experiences and relationships between women, men, boys and girls. However, an RGA should be built up progressively, and therefore the forthcoming report will provide an initial but incomplete insight into the gendered situation within the South Sudanese refugee community in West Nile. Read More...

Improving Effective Coverage of Maternal, New-born and Child Health Interventions for Reducing Preventable Child Deaths in Tangail and Khulna

Bangladesh has achieved success in reducing U5 & maternal mortality in last decade. UNICEF is partnering with GoB to contribute to reduce maternal and newborn deaths. To this end, MoH&FW with partnering with UNICEF and technical support from KOIKA implemented a MNCH project (IECMNCH) in Tangail and Khulna in line with UNICEF’s efforts to pay attention to low performing upazilas and HTR areas, started in 2015. CARE is one of the partners on this project.
designed to address main causes of newborn deaths (birth asphyxia, infection, prematurity)
to increase availability, utilization of quality MNCH-&-Nutrition services by
- increasing, sustaining of effective coverage of selected interventions;
- strengthening health system with increased availability & access to quality MNCH services;
-positive behaviour & social norm change through community participation & ownership for effective demand creation for increased utilization of MNCH services.

A baseline study in 2015 and an endline evaluation study in 2018 were implemented by UNICEF. Here are the endline study findings with corresponding baseline findings where necessary.
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Improving Sexual, Reproductive Health and Rights Including Maternal and Newborn Health in Bangladesh

UNICEF in collaboration with Bangladesh government launched a project “Improving Sexual, Reproductive Health and Rights including Maternal and Newborn Health in Bangladesh” to improve integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights including maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health in 5 districts. CARE was a key implementing partner in this project.

Before implementation of the project a baseline study in 5 project districts (Patuakhali, Rangamati, Sirajganj, Jamalpur and Moulvibazar) with 4 comparison districts (Barguna, Khagrachhari, Lalmonirhat and Sylhet), implemented by UNICEF and conducted by SURCH between 9th May and 18th August 2018
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Pathways Project End of Project Evaluation Report

Pathways aimed to increase productivity and income in equitable agriculture systems. CARE innovated an effective Theory of Change to address real issues affecting rural women farmers by providing them with capacities in agriculture; access to inputs, extension services and markets; empowerment to influence decisions; and an enabling environment for growth.

Pathways has met and, in most cases, surpassed targets set in its M&E framework. In the words of women themselves the project has worked very well, focusing on groundnuts and soybean as high-value cash crop substitutes for tobacco because of their high potential for markets, ability to replenish the lost soil fertility and strong nutritional value. It has grown from working with 9,000 to 14,282 farmers (hosting a population of 71,410 people), organising them into 1,528 groups. Women provide leadership to most of the groups after being transformed to become successful wives, farmers and entrepreneurs who can make independent decisions and speak in public.

In 2015 alone, collective sale revenues from groundnuts and soy amounted to MK128, 601,938 (US$233,821.7) and rose to MK854, 356,267 (US$751,511) by the end of 2017. Contract farming organized by the project contributed US$34,233 to these revenues. In 2014, the project conducted 188 community-wide gender dialogue sessions and reached out to 9,654 people, 7193 female and 2464 male, helping them to internalize and address gender inequalities. Men have generally started looking at women as partners in agriculture and development that is cementing marriage bonds and creating an enabling environment for women to succeed. Along with this, CARE Malawi linked women farmers to key players in the groundnut and soy value chains to help them excel.

As a consequence, by December 2016 a total of 246 farmer groups had accounts with OIBM and other banks through which they saved MK49, 175,577 and 6 VSLs accessed two group loans worth MK4,800,000 (US$7,804.88) which they invested in agriculture, business and VSL activities. VSLs profited and shared out US$871,178 in the year, with more benefits seen in 2017 when savings accumulated to US$3,756,435 e.g. earnings of MK47, 489.32 to MK204, 769.33 per household on average. In turn, per capita household monthly incomes and expenditures doubled by the time the project closed in December 2018. Although agricultural productivity continued to decline over the project life due to poor weather conditions, Pathways farmers remained food secure and continued to eat at least two meals a day. Household dietary diversity (HDDS) and women intra-household food access (AHA) data from this evaluation found levels of consumption to be acceptable and typical of food secure households. These results showcase that Pathways beneficiaries have grown their incomes, assets and food availability in the face of the changing climate and are better off even in difficult years. Read More...

Final Evaluation Partnership for Learning

The Partnership for Learning (P4L) project is funded by Educate a Child (EAC) P4L whose goal is to return 6 million out-of-school children to school all around the world. P4L has been implemented by CARE Haiti since November 2013 in partnership with several institutions that provided leverage funding such as the Haitian Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MENFP), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR), TOMS, LIV Livres Solidaires, LIDE, GAP Inc and other local and international institutions. P4L is implemented in the departments of Ouest, Grand’Anse, Centre and Artibonite.

At the end of the project, 53,059 girls and boys had been enrolled by the project in 465 partner schools. The enrollment rate of formerly out of school children age 5-17 supported by the project (parent survey data) is estimated as 95.4% in school year 2017-2018, compared to 92.0% among the children age 5-17 from randomly sampled households. There was a statistically significant difference (chi-squared = 14.399, df=3, p<0.01) in the enrolment rate per department, with the department of Centre having the lowest rate of children 5-17 years in school (93.0%) and Grand’Anse with the highest at 97.7%. Read More...

Promote the resilience of disaster affected urban populations in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) implemented a Project title “Promote the resilience of disaster affected urban populations in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa” from June 01, 2017 to December 2018 in Peshawar with the primary focus on Community Based Disaster Risk Management, funded by European Commission Humanitarian Aid & Civil Protection (ECHO). The project was implemented in three Union Councils (UCs) of Peshawar district including Andar Shehr, Khalisa-1 and Khalisa-2 and targeted 39,147 beneficiaries including vulnerable women, men, disables, refugees and minorities. The project was also aimed at institutional development of Govt. departments on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR).

An external evaluation was carried out to collect quantitative and qualitative data through structured survey, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. The study was conducted in the project targeted UCs of Peshawar and with the stakeholders involved. The evaluation was based on Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development – Development Assistance Committee (OECD-DAC) criteria including relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. In addition, the evaluation focused on project management and verification of DRR mitigation schemes rehabilitated.

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Phase Two Endline Report – Can Communities take charge? The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan

The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education in Afghanistan (ALSE) is a multiyear, randomized controlled trial that aims to deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school access and learning through CBE, and (2) to sustain the gains achieved through CBE into the future. ALSE’s Phase One explored the effects of CBE on education access, children’s learning achievement and villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions. Phase Two focused on testing a CBE sustainability model, where village-level community institutions take charge of the CBE management jointly with local government education offices. Key findings from the Phase Two study include:1. ALSE’s cost-comparison analysis of CBE administration shows that the cost of the sustainability model of CBE is 53.7% the cost of NGO management of CBE per village. 2. Community administration of CBE under the sustainability model is as effective as under continued NGO administration in terms of promoting access to education and children’s learning, significantly outperforming what one might expect, given the cost difference mentioned above. 3. Community management under the sustainability model provides access and learning opportunities for both boys and girls; the model performs slightly more effectively for girls than for boys in increasing access to education, although this difference is not statistically significant. 4. The confidence in village community institutions among heads of households and CBE teachers did not differ from their confidence in those institutions under NGO administration. However, under the sustainability model, community leaders’ confidence in local institutions was lower than their confidence in these institutions under NGO management. Moreover, CBE teachers’ confidence that CBE classes will continue under the sustainability model was weaker than that of their peers in communities under the NGO model. The absence of mechanisms, including funds to ensure long-term access to the CBE classes, likely influenced this decline in confidence. 5. The level of villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions under the sustainability model of CBE were not significantly different than the level found in areas under continued NGO administration. Read More...

INCREASING PROTECTION OF REFUGEE WOMEN AND GIRLS PROJECT IN UGANDA’S WEST NILE IMVEPI SETTLEMENT, ARUA DISTRICT

With funding from Danish Telethon (DT), CARE International in Uganda has been implementing a project titled: Increasing Protection of Refugee Women and Girls in Uganda’s West Nile Region in Imvepi settlement and affected host community members in Zone 2. The Project was implemented over ten (10) months.
Project Goal: To increase the protection and confidence of South Sudanese refugee women and girls fleeing to Uganda by reducing their vulnerability and that of the host communities. In particular, the project targets Persons with Specific Needs (PSNs), women and girls, through the promotion of human dignity, increased resilience, and improved protection. Read More...

Lifesaving Shelter, Protection and Livelihoods for South Sudanese Refugees in Omugo Zone, Rhino Settlement, Arua District, West Nile Region in Uganda

CARE International in Uganda conducted a baseline study to establish the pre-intervention situation primarily on Shelter, Protection and Livelihoods for South Sudanese Refugees and host community in Omugo Zone, Rhino Camp. This baseline findings will inform project implementation approaches/strategies and decisions and provide benchmarks for assessing results and impacts of the project at the end. A quick baseline assessment carried out by CARE and partners in February 2019 identified that Omugo is still one of the areas with needs and requires immediate support. CARE is already operational in Omugo thus allowing for the necessary rapid scale-up and complementary coverage that NMFA2 funding will provide under CARE’s integrated humanitarian response program. On May 16, 2019, the UNHCR officially confirmed partners, including CARE to consider scaling up provision of semi-permanent shelters for Persons with Special Needs (PSNs) and introduction of livelihoods to address negative coping strategies by refugee girls, women and host community youth.
The objective of the Baseline survey for the NMFA2 project The objective was to generate baseline data and assess the status quo regarding access to shelter, reported or perceived protection from GBV, sexual exploitation and abuse and coverage of Livelihood interventions. Data was collected from 371 refugees and the report focuses at three thematic areas, to be implemented under the NMFA project – Lifesaving shelter, protection form GBV, sexual exploitation and abuse and Livelihood component targeting the general project beneficiary population. Read More...

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