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Report on Contract Farming

This 24 page report discusses how land ownership traditionally remains the main source of wealth, social status, and economic and political power in Nepal. Apart from its productive value linked to livelihoods and food security, land ownership for the marginalized communities often becomes the determining factor between a life with dignity and security, and exposure to different vulnerabilities and uncertainties. Ironically, however, the richest 5% own 37% of the total cultivable land leaving only 15% to be shared among rest of the 47% households. Landlessness is as high as 32.1 %. Over 44% Dalits in the Terai and 22% of those in hills are landless and, thereby, deprived of their socio- economic rights.While landlessness is very high in the country, over 30 % of cultivable land is estimated to have been left fallow for various reasons such as increasing out-migration of youth, rapid urbanization, decreasing competitiveness for agricultural produce and use of farm land for alternative purposes. Land owners most often keep their land fallow fearing that giving them out for tenant farming would ultimately rob them of their land ownership. Read More...

Northern Uplands – Promoting Climate Resilience (NU PCR) Final Evaluation

NU-PCR is a climate change adaptation project implemented in three districts -- Mai, Samphan, and Ngot Ou -- in Phongsaly, Laos. It has a budget of 2,152,800 €. The project is being implemented by CARE International in Lao PDR as the lead agency together with the partner organisations CCL and SAEDA. NU-PCR worked in 30 villages with 1,778 households and 9,562 direct beneficiaries. The project is designed to improve the resilience of local ethic communities in Phongsaly Province to the impacts of climate Read More...

Northern Uplands Promoting Climate Resilience (NU PCR) Narrative Report

NU-PCR is a climate change adaptation project implemented in three districts -- Mai, Samphan, and Ngot Ou -- in Phongsaly, Laos. It has a budget of 2,152,800 €. The project is being implemented by CARE International in Lao PDR as the lead agency together with the partner organisations CCL and SAEDA. NU-PCR worked in 30 villages with 1,778 households and 9,562 direct beneficiaries. The project is designed to improve the resilience of local ethic communities in Phongsaly Province to the impacts of climate change and to strengthen the capacity of government authorities and villagers. [55 pages] Read More...

POWER Ex-Post Evaluation Final Report

Description of the document: Promoting Opportunities for Women’s Economic Empowerment in Rural Africa (POWER Africa) aimed to increase the financial inclusion of direct beneficiaries and their households in Ethiopia, Rwanda, Cote d’Ivoire and Burundi through forming savings groups, providing financial education, and linking mature groups to formal financial institutions. In Burundi, CARE worked in partnership with the local NGO, Great Lakes Inkinga Development, to target adolescent girls; the hardest hit by a combination of poverty, conflict, violence, societal disintegration, and sexual exploitation. The evaluation focuses on the program’s contribution to the empowerment of adolescent girls in Burundi with a particular focus on assessing the contribution of program activities to supporting adolescent girls develop income-generating activities. POWER Africa adapted their approach to ensure the intervention and engagement strategies were tailored to working with adolescent girls in Burundi. POWER Africa accomplished this through sensitization sessions to gain community acceptance of the program, by adapting the VSLA training schedule, by changing meeting times, and by responding to challenges encountered by girls during implementation. Positive outcomes reported by CARE related to business success were also supported by interviews conducted in the field. However, the extent to which participation resulted in adolescent girls establishing one or more IGA varies and CARE monitoring data shows that at least 1 in 5 girls did not establish IGAs. It was confirmed that key factors that contribute to IGA success, as identified by CARE, still hold. Girls without support are less able to establish IGAs and have relatively less successful IGAs. However, they are not necessary conditions. For example, the four girls that did not have continuous family support attributed overcoming their difficulties to being a member of the VSLA. Findings that girls who are in school reported higher incomes, that girls with community support are more able to invest in livestock, and that girls with access to land have more IGA opportunities, still hold. POWER Africa’s identification that male control of female-owned assets, loss of assets upon marriage, household responsibilities and constraints on mobility are key constraints for adolescent girls to benefit from IGA opportunities, still holds. During program implementation, many girls encountered barriers as a result of their newfound economic independence. The program actively sought to address these constraints with some success, however there is evidence to suggest a number of challenges remain. This is to be expected as social norms can take time to change. Lastly, regarding sustainability, the field research supported the idea that some of the IGAs created by the girls as a result of POWER Africa VSLA membership are sustainable as all of the girls said they still have their IGAs and plan to continue them in the future. All of the girls also planned to continue their membership of the VSLAs. Findings also suggest that the POWER Africa program positively influenced social norms relating to what activities are considered acceptable for girls to take part in, male control over assets and that participants are more resilient to environmental and economic shocks as a result of their improved financial position.

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POWER Africa – Baseline Report

Description of the document: POWER Africa aims to increase financial inclusion in Côte d’Ivoire, Burundi, Ethiopia and Rwanda through the VSLA approach while also creating a platform for sharing lessons learned within and between the four target countries. In this context, it is vital to be able to access (and assess) the experience of each country, which can only be achieved by carrying out an in-depth base-lining exercise to identify the current situation in the lives of rural people in the target countries – and then measure progress against that situation. The consulting company has been contracted to design and implement an extensive baseline study, to build local capacity and enabling the tools and database to be used effectively to conduct further studies at mid and end-line points. The study shows that: 1. Proportionally, more VSLA women and saving than non-VSLA women; 2. VSLA women are saving larger sums than VSLA men and non-VSLA women and men; 3. Resorting to loans from the VSLA solidarity fund is reducing the strain on already hard-pressed relatives and neighbors; 4. 87% of VSLA women and one or more IGA (78% for non-VSLA women); 5. VSLA men tend to have just one IGA; 6. VSLA women (42%) are taking out loans to fund their IGAs, as opposed to only 26% non-VSLA women; 7. VSLA men are not using their loans for IGA development; 8. VSLA women are already reporting feeling more positive and confident about expressing their opinions and participating in household decision-making; 9. VSLA men are aware of the benefits of including women in decision-making and say they committed to encouraging it in their households.

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Cyclone Idai Regional Rapid Gender Analysis

CARE International is responding to the impact of Cyclone Idai and the associated floods in Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. As part of our response, CARE’s team in each of the countries is currently developing or is planning to develop a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) for the affected regions. An RGA provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis. It is built up progressively using a range of primary and secondary information to understand gender roles and relations and how they may change during a crisis. It provides practical programming and operational recommendations to meet the different needs of women, men, boys and girls of different ages, abilities and other contextually relevant forms of diversity and to ensure we ‘do no harm’. RGA uses the tools and approaches of Gender Analysis Frameworks – such as community mapping; focus group discussions, key informant interviews, safety audit tools and secondary data review - and adapts them to the tight time-frames, rapidly changing contexts and insecure environments that often characterise humanitarian interventions. Read More...

Humanitarian Program Baseline/KAP Survey Report- Balkh and Kabul Provinces

CARE’s Emergency Shelter, NFI, Hygiene, SRHR and Livelihood Support for Disaster-Affected Populations in Afghanistan (EHSSAN) Project has planned to assist 4,400 households in seven provinces (Kabul, Balkh, Parwan, Kapisa, Ghazni, Paktia and Khost). The hygiene, CFW, SRH, Winterization and UCG activities are implemented in two Kabul and Balkh provinces as project plan and rest of NFI and shelter assistance are provided to all targeted provinces. A baseline study was conducted to establish baseline values for indicators of intended outcomes and collect information about the target group prior to intervention. The survey findings in Kabul and Balkh provinces shows that, 19% of families are headed by women in the targeted area and 52.8% of women involved in CDCs & household level decision making. Regarding their income main source 89% of respondents said they received income from daily wage activities to fulfil their basic need in current situation. 48% of targeted people received humanitarian assistance from different humanitarian actors in past 6 months. 98% of individual respondent declared that, their basic need is cash, 62% of individual declared that their basic need is food assistance. 34% of FGD respondent confirmed that, their basic need is cash as well, but 67 % of female respondent basic was job opportunity and vocational trainings. 67% of women have economy contribution with their family through skill and job salary. [33 pages] Read More...

EU-Recovery Midterm Evaluation Workshop Summary

The project aims to enhance the social and economic stability in the drought affected areas through supporting the recovery of livelihoods of the affected population and building their resiliency in the target 18 Woredas/Districts of the Oromia, Amhara and Tigray national regional states.

The project contract with the donor EU was signed in March 2016 while the project implementation was started retroactively in January 2016, with budget of Euro 18 million for 18 months duration up to July 2017. The project is being implemented jointly by CARE UK/Ethiopia (leading NGO) and SCI, ORDA and REST in 18 Woredas/Districts of the Oromia, Amhara and Tigray national regional states. [8 pages] Read More...

Graduation with Resilience to Achieve Sustainable Development (GRAD): Midterm

The Feinstein International Center for Tufts University commissioned a Mid-Term Evaluation (MTE) of the USAID-funded Feed the Future project entitled Graduation with Resilience to Achieve Sustainable Development (GRAD). The project is being implemented by a consortium of seven partners1 under the leadership of CARE in sixteen Woredas in four regions across Ethiopia (Tigray, Amhara, Oromia and the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Region). Under a Strategic Objective to graduate 50,000 chronically food insecure households from the government's Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP) and increase each household’s income by $365 per year, the project has three components, to (1) increase economic options for targeted households through value chain development and access to capital from micro-finance institutions and village-based savings and credit groups, (2) strengthen household and community resilience through interventions targeting women's empowerment, nutritional status, climate change adaptation and household aspirations, and (3) strengthen the enabling environmental to facilitate sustaining and replicating the impact of the project. The total project cost at approval was US$ 23,400,000 for a period of five years from 5 December 2011 through 4 December 2016. [55 pages]
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PRIME: Endline Survey Report

PRIME, a five-year project, was launched in 2012 to help vulnerable pastoralist communities become more resilient to shocks of this nature. Led by Mercy Corps, PRIME is a consortium of 10 organizations whose main objective is to reduce poverty and hunger in the drought-prone Afar, Oromiya and Somali regions. To accomplish these objectives, PRIME implements market- driven approaches to livestock production and livelihood diversification that simultaneously support dryland communities to adapt to a changing climate. As part of its project activities, PRIME developed a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan to assess the project's overall impact and the performance of related indicators (impact, outcome and output), and custom indicators on animal health services and the dietary diversity of infants and pregnant and lactating women. [64 pages] Read More...

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