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Multiagency and Multisectoral Rapid Need Assessment in North Gondar and West Tigray Zones Among Conflict Affected IDPs and Host Communities

In its report released a couple of weeks ago, UN urged donor partners and friends of Ethiopia for urgent mobilization of additional resources to address potential new needs as a result of the fighting for the law enforcement, as well as existing needs previously identified in the Humanitarian Response Plan. There are more than 2 million people in need of some type of assistance in Tigray region and thousands of people fleeing from Tigray region to Amhara and Afar regions, having lost everything in the conflict.
As a result of this situation, six international humanitarian agencies including World Vision Ethiopia, CARE, Catholic Relief Service, ActionAid Ethiopia, Oxfam Ethiopia and ORDA agreed to collaborate and carry out joint rapid assessment in most affected woredas of Tigray region and influx affected neighboring woredas of Amhara region. The assessment was organized and carried out in two teams. Team one following the North Wollo and South West Tigray Route (Raya Kobo, Alamata, Raya Azebo and Ofla) and team two following the North Gondar and West Tigray Route (Addi Arikay, Beyada, Janamora and Tselimti). Accordingly, the mission teams have started the assessment on 23rd Dec. 2020 through 3rd Jan 2021. This report is an analysis of the assessment process and findings of team two. This report is 26 pages long. Read More...

Growing Nutrition for Mothers and Children (GROW) Project in Ethiopia – End Line Household Survey Report

CARE has implemented the Growing Nutrition for Mothers and Children (GROW) Project in Ethiopia between 2017 and 2019. The goal of GROW was to improve the nutritional status of women of reproductive age and boys and girls under 5 years. This endline study was conducted to establish values for outcome level indicators for the project and assess change and impact of the project by comparing data from baseline to end line values. This evaluation employed a cross-sectional study design. The study includes a household survey and anthropometric measurements of women and children to assess their nutritional status. The study covered 39 project intervention Kebeles in 14 Woredas of East and West Hararghe and Afar. A total of 1291 women, 974 men, and 1291 children were included in the study. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

A Win-Win for Gender and Nutrition: Testing A Gender-Transformative Approach From Asia In Africa

Since 2016, CARE Burundi has partnered with Great Lakes Inkingi Development (GLID), RBU2000, and the University of Burundi/Agronomy department and the Africa Center for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment to implement and test the EKATA approach – Empowerment through Knowledge And Transformative Action – integrated into an agriculture program to test its effectiveness against a typical gender mainstreaming approach (Gender Light) and a Control (with agriculture interventions only) in a modified randomized control trial, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Win-Win project randomly assigned collines to EKATA, Gender Light and Control groups. Baseline data was collected in 2016 – Midterm was conducted in 2018, and end-line data was collected in 2020 from a random sample of 1,315 households and 1,849 individuals (1,059 female heads of household, and 790 male heads of household). Additionally, the project conducted 36 individual in-depth interviews, disaggregated by sex and age – and male- or female-headed households – at baseline, midline and end-line. This data was complimented with focus group discussions (FGDs). The evaluation looked at the impact of EKATA compared with Gender
Light and Control on several areas, including rice production (which was the main focus crop), income and wealth, gender equality and women’s empowerment. The cost-effectiveness of these approaches also was analyzed. The evaluation used the project level Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (Pro-WEAI) to measure changes in gender equality and women’s empowerment. Read More...

Formative Research for Social & Behavior Change (SBC) in nutrition, reproductive health and WASH

Between July and August 2016 formative research was carried out by HKI with the overall scope to gather evidence about current practices in nutrition, reproductive health and WASH and identify appropriate strategies for achieving project social and behaviour change outcomes. The formative research explored behaviors, focusing on improving the health and nutritional status of pregnant and lactating women as well as children, and improving access to and utilization of WASH infrastructure. The research findings will be used to generate a robust Social and Behavior Change Communication Strategy (SBCC) focused on several key practices. Topics explored by the research were reproductive health, children and maternal nutrition, WASH and media exposure. The report is 80 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Youth Livelihoods Needs Assessment & Labor Market Assesssment

This study was undertaken to assess the supply side (youth ages 14-30 needs and preferences related to livelihoods), as well as the demand side (needs and opportunities in the labor market) in preparation for the design of the Youth Empowerment & Leadership (YELI or “enlighten” in Bambara) curriculum and training plan (IO 2.2). This report is 37 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study of the Food for Peace Development Food Assistance Project in Mali Final

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded a contract for a development food assistance project in Mali in fiscal year (FY) 2015 to CARE International. The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project is implemented by CARE and its partners: Save the Children; Helen Keller International; Yam Giribolo Tumo; Sahel-Eco; and the Research and Technical Applications Group. The goal of the HARANDE Project—which means food security in Peulh—is to provide access to sustainable food, nutrition, and income security for 310,855 vulnerable household members in four districts (Bandiagara, Douentza, Tenenkou, and Youwarou) of the Mopti region in Mali by 2020. FFP contracted ICF to conduct a baseline study of the HARANDE Project in 2016 as the first phase of a pre-post evaluation cycle. The second phase will include a final evaluation, inclusive of an endline survey, in approximately five years. The baseline study includes a representative population-based household survey to collect data for key FFP indicators and a qualitative study to add context, richness, and depth to the findings from the household survey. The report is 434 pages long. Read More...

Mali Resilience Research Report

The objective of this research is to provide implementing partners, the Office of Food for Peace (FFP), the Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance (FANTA) Project, and the United States Agency for International Development / Center for Resilience (C4R) with insights into factors that strengthen household and community resilience in Mali. This report complements the Baseline Study implemented by ICF International in Fiscal Year 2016. The research examines factors, in the context of resilience and mitigation of the negative effects of shocks and stresses on well-being, which can serve as the foundation for an evidence base for improving resilience programming in the Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project areas. This report is 102 pages long. Read More...

Gender Sensitive Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment for Harande Development Food Assistance Program

The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience program for the Promotion of Nutrition Security, Livelihoods and Accountability, or Harandé, is designed to promote resilience of participants through coordinated interventions to improve food and nutrition security, while strengthening the capacity
of the population at the household and community level to respond and deal with a myriad of shocks and stress factors. Recognizing climate change, gender inequality along with the vulnerability of some sections of the community as an obstacle underlying food and nutrition insecurity, and a key stressor towards instability and insecurity, a holistic understanding of gender sensitive‐climate vulnerability and adaptive capacities of target communities is an imperative step for the success of program interventions. The report is 77 pages long. Read More...

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