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WASH, PROTECTION AND SRHR SUPPORT TO IDPS AND RETURNEES IN IRAQ 2020-2021 Baseline

With funding support from the Global Affairs Canada (GAC), CARE implements a 24 months multi-sectoral livesaving project: WASH, Protection and SRMH support to IDPs and Returnees in Iraq 2020-2021 in Duhok governorate (Chamishko and Essyan IDP camps) and Ninewa governorate (Sinjar district) with 64,434 individuals (18,169 women, 14,701 girls, 16,924 men, 14,640 boys) direct beneficiaries aiming at WASH, Protection Intervention, and SMRH. The methodology for baseline survey is based on using mixed-method participatory approach as baseline team believes that participation improves quality and enhances ownership.
The CARE baseline survey data collection for the camps took place from May 21, 2020 to May 31, 2020, and in Sinjar district from September 1, 2020 to September 10, 2020. The purpose of the baseline study is to better understand the situation and current needs of the population in order to ensure more effective and responsive project implementation as well as improved living conditions for IDPs, returnees and host communities in the project areas [45 pages]. Read More...

Restoring Water Supply System and improved Sanitation and Hygiene Practices in West Mosul, Iraq – Phase III Baseline

With funding support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Czech Republic (MoFA Czech), CARE will implement a six - months project aimed at restoring water supply system and improved sanitation and hygiene practices in West Mosul, Iraq. The project will be implemented in West Mosul Zenjele and Ghazlani neighborhoods targeting IDPs, host communities and returnees with 47,500 direct beneficiaries.
The baseline assessment targeted areas identified as high priority by Directorate of water that are in need of rehabilitation and replacement of non-functional parts of water infrastructure. Local authorities are currently overwhelmed by the scale of needs and require support from donors and humanitarian agencies, as a direct contribution to enabling affected populations to have durable solutions through sustainable restoration of services such as water and sanitation. The project will directly support repair of two vital water infrastructure at Ghazlani water treatment plant and Yarmouk booster pumping station in the area of West Mosul while supporting the Municipal Authorities by building their capacity to eventually recover their costs.

The purpose of the Baseline Survey was to obtain a better understanding of the current situation in relation to water supply, sanitation and hygiene amongst the population in the target areas, and establish baseline benchmarks on key project indicators, which will enable the level of success of the project to be measured at the project end. The results of the baseline survey will later be used to evaluate the extent to which the project has met the desired impact post project implementation compared against project endline results.
The baseline assessment assesses:
• Access to safe water and sanitation situation pre-implementation.
• Challenge of solid waste management systems and existence practices.
• Hygiene education sessions on household level
• knowledge, perception, attitude and practice in relation to hygiene, water and sanitation.
[24 pages] Read More...

EDUCATION AND PROTECTION FOR SYRIANS IN JORDAN PROJECT ADA Final Evaluation

The “Education and Protection for Syrians in Jordan'' project has been implemented through CARE International in Jordan and funded by ADA. This project is designed to address the needs of vulnerable Syrians and Jordanian citizens, and targeted four urban areas of Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, Mafraq, and Zarqa. The first objective provided conditional cash for the protection and education of vulnerable youth who are at risk of dropping out or have already dropped out of school due to either working or due to the risk of early/child marriage and, therefore, not attending school. The second objective focused on providing vulnerable families with case-management support, following which referrals were made in order to connect these beneficiaries with both internal and/or external services. In addition, interventions included peer-to-peer support group activities, as well as one-day Psychosocial sessions (PS) implemented at CARE community centers that were focused on recreational, educational, and empowerment activities. The third objective provided small business development training and grants to entrepreneurs hoping to establish or expand their businesses. [19 pages]. Read More...

Action for Supporting Host Community Adaptation & Resilience ASHAR Alo Yearly Review 2020

As a multi-year project, mid-term review/year-end assessment has been commissioned to assess relevancy of design, approach and methodology, implementation strategy, efficiency and effectiveness of actions, effects of actions on community people etc. This is an internal assessment to improve the project. The ASHAR Alo project targets host communities located outside of the refugee camps, consolidating programmatic gains through OFDA funding for sustainable development in the area. The project activities are focused on Jaliyapalong, and Palongkhali. CARE aims to strengthen host communities' resilience, by enhancing community-based disaster risk reduction (DRR), upgrading infrastructure and providing livelihoods opportunities, across shelter, settlement and WASH sectors. The project will also respond to the urgent protection and gender-based violence needs in the host community. Activities are being undertaken in collaboration with government and community stakeholders, as well as UN and NGO actors.

The assessment was conducted in September 2020 applying both quantitative and qualitative tools and approaches. The samples were drawn purposively. Considering the COVID-19 situation, the short sample size was determined following most common statistical formulae. Throughout the study, it follows USAID compliance and directives. It covers a total of 228 respondent’s households from 4 WARDs under Jaliyapalong Union in Ukhiya Upazailla, Cox’s Bazar district. Quantitative Data collection has been conducted with Tablets using KoBo. [41 pages].
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Productive Water Technologies to enhance resilience for smallholder farming households in Chiredzi and Mberengwa Baseline Report

CARE International in Zimbabwe is implementing the Productive Water Technologies to enhance Resilience for Smallholder Farming Households initiative, within two existing CARE resilience building projects. The LDSC-funded intervention will complement the software components of two ongoing CARE projects funded by the Zimbabwe Resilience Building Fund (ZRBF), which is managed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The two CARE projects, Enhancing Community Resilience and Sustainability (ECRAS) running from July 2016 to March 2021, and Enhancing Community Resilience and Inclusive Market Systems (ECRIMS) running from September 2017 to October 2020, are being implemented in Chiredzi (and Mwenezi) and Mberengwa (and Zvishavane) districts respectively.
The current projects mainly focus on software (training, capacity-building, etc.), with limited establishment of water infrastructure. Specifically, the new initiative will support year-round access to productive water for smallholder farming households in Chiredzi and Mberengwa districts through the establishment/construction and rehabilitation of water infrastructure and related production assets. Year-round water access will address challenges relating to livestock and crop production, thus helping improve food and nutrition security for smallholder farming households, including those headed by women and youth. Some of the water points also will provide safe drinking water. In each of the two districts (Mberengwa and Chiredzi), the proposed project interventions will be layered on and integrated with the two ongoing CARE projects to enhance resilience and sustainability. Both ECRAS and ECRIMS aim to increase community capacities to sustain development gains and achieve improved well-being in the face of shocks and stresses. The projects, which enhance household and community resilience, seek to achieve five outcomes: Household and community capacities and assets are strengthened to deal with economic and climate-related shocks and stresses [54 pages]. Read More...

Impact Evaluation of the Strengthen PSNP4 Institutions and Resilience (SPIR) Development Food Security Activity (DFSA) Baseline

World Vision, CARE and ORDA designed the SPIR DFSA to support delivery of PSNP4 while also developing and delivering multisectoral programming across the four project purposes in order to enhance livelihoods, increase resilience to shocks, and improve food security and nutrition for PSNP4 clients. The SPIR project will use community-level programming, training of government staff involved in public service delivery at the woreda (district) and kebele (subdistrict) level, and targeted livelihood transfers to support and strengthen PSNP4. Resource transfers received by SPIR participants will come primarily from transfers received from the PSNP4, as well as one-time livelihood transfers provided to the poorest PNSP clients to support livelihoods and promote graduation. Most other benefits of the SPIR project appear in the form of improved public service delivery and trainings to promote learning and support for community-level groups. For learning purposes, the SPIR impact evaluation combines major core components and innovative new activities under Purpose 1 on livelihoods and Purpose 2 on nutrition, along with selected activities under Purpose 3 on gender and youth and Purpose 4 on climate resilience, into a study design of overlapping interventions to learn what combination of activities has the greatest impact and is most cost-effective at improving SPIR outcomes [128 pages].

Attached to the Baseline Report are 3 Learning Briefs, The effects of SPIR poultry and unconditional cash transfers on livelihoods outcomes, The effects of SPIR interventions on nutrtion and childcare, and The effects of SPIR livelihoods and nutrition interventions on women’s and men’s well-being.
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A Social Impact Analysis of CARE’s ‘Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment ’ Project

The Enhancing Women’s Voice to Stop Sexual Harassment project (STOP), an initiative of CARE Australia, has been working since 2017 to prevent and address the under-reported problem of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector. At the time of writing, STOP is the only initiative that addresses this issue on a multi-country scale within the sub-region. Operating across a pool of garment factories in four Mekong countries—Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam—STOP aims to enhance women’s voice and economic rights at both the national and factory levels. Based on a socio-ecological model of violence prevention, CARE Country Offices (COs) are working with participating factories to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less SH through the implementation of standardised SH reporting mechanisms and rigorous training programs. Supported by CARE Regional staff, each CARE CO engages with relevant country, regional and international stakeholders to strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address SH in the workplace.

In 2018, CARE Australia commissioned a consortium of researchers from UNSW Sydney and UNSW Canberra to undertake an independent evaluation the STOP project and provide a separate Social Impact Assessment (SIA) focused on Cambodia STOP as the particular case study. The SIA is intended to complement the findings of the Final Evaluation (FE) of the STOP, as implemented in the other three project sites. The SIA and the Final Evaluation should be read as two parts of a single whole. The UNSW team drew upon a range of evaluative sources including factory surveys, focus group discussions and key informant interviews with factory workers, middle management and government officials. A conceptual framework is also advanced in order to better capture the nuances of social impact and gender transformation, and to provide a rigorous basis on which to evaluate STOP’s development and implementation in Cambodia. [94 pages]. Read More...

Empowering Sri Lanka’s Tea Plantation Communities Final Evaluation

In May 2017 Chrysalis in partnership with CARE International UK began implementing the Empowering Sri Lanka’s Tea Plantation Communities Project funded by Twinning’s adopting Community Development Forums (CDFs) pioneered by CARE International Sri Lanka. These platforms seek to enhance worker-management relationships so to achieve social and commercial benefits in 7 tea estates in Sri Lanka by May 2019. Since inception the project has reached over 3,500 tea estate workers living in estates operated by three plantation companies with the help of the CDFs, while indirectly providing benefits to over 16,000 worker family members. At its core CDFs seek to transform relationships between management and estate workers, while also providing the estate community with a platform through which to directly influence and shape their development priorities and solutions. Further it serves to help link the community with a host of service providers and socioeconomic opportunities. Undertaken in July and August 2019 the overall objective of the end of project evaluation was to assess the degree to which the project had achieved its intermediate and the final goal and to develop key lessons so to enhance future programming in the sector. The evaluation used a contribution analysis, and a mixed method approach to collect data (e.g. household surveys, focus group discussions, key informant and structured interviews). Data was collected from 7 participating estates operated by 3 companies: Bogawanthalawa Plantations (Bogawana Estate, Kotiyagala Estate, Lethenty Estate and Fetteresso Estate), Malwatte Valley Plantations (Uva Highlands) and Agarapathana (Nayabedde Estate and Dambetenna Estate). Using the proportionate random sampling technique 241 respondents were selected for household surveys, 12 managers were interviewed using structured interviews and 7 focus group discussions were held consisting of 86 representatives from the 7 CDFs. A total of 16 key informants were also consulted [73 pages]. Read More...

Integrated GBV prevention and response to the emergency needs of newly displaced women, men, girls, and boys in Borno State, North-East Nigeria Midterm

Currently, 41 sites across 11 LGAs in Borno are in ‘high congestion’ status with 285,000 individuals above camp capacity resulting in the majority of individuals having no access to shelter and being forced to sleep in overcrowded shelters or outside. The provision of life-saving assistance to the most vulnerable persons of concern is hampered by a continuous unfavorable environment marked by conflict-induced insecurity and protracted displacement. Limited access to adequate services, particularly in newly accessible areas, continues to exacerbate protection risks to the affected population. The ECHO-GBV project is an 18 months’ project funded by ECHO being implemented in Bama and Ngala LGAs of Borno state to provide lifesaving GBV prevention and response services to newly displaced women, girls, boys and men and vulnerable host community members. The intended use of this evaluation is to: assess the performance of project indicators against set objectives, goals and targets, review Programme strategy and methods and inform learning; hence, the primary target of this report is the ECHO participants as well as staff [24 pages]. Read More...

Integrated GBV prevention and response to the emergency needs of newly displaced women, men, girls, and boys in Borno State, North-East Nigeria Baseline

To ensure the efficiency and effectiveness of the project, CARE pays specific attention to the changes to be made, effects and impacts of the intervention for displaced populations, and hosts affected within Borno State. It therefore appears necessary to define the baseline situation in order to have information that can provide precise indicators on the sector concerned by the assistance, and to develop a monitoring and evaluation system for the continuous updating of the changes and facilitate the analysis of the transformations induced at the end of the project. A total of 3 IDP camps (Arabic camp and International Secondary School of in Ngala and Government Secondary School GSS camp in Bama LGA) and 4 host communities (Ngala, Gambaru A and B in Ngala and Bama town in Bama LGA) were covered by the baseline, within the two targeted LGAs. Taking 5% of each population, 5,009 respondents in Bama and 2,054 respondents in Ngala were surveyed [23 pages]. Read More...

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