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Pro-Resilience Action Program Baseline Study

Christian Aid and United Purpose are leading separate consortia implementing the ProResilience Action (Pro ACT) programme with funding from the European Commission. The programme aims to address existing food and nutrition security challenges among the poorest households under social cash transfer in seven districts by increasing their resilience to climaterelated stresses and shocks. The project will support interventions that foster great resilience to climatic shocks and diversification of livelihoods for vulnerable households and create synergies with the existing support to Social Cash Transfer Programme (SCTP). With this background, Christian Aid Malawi and United Purpose jointly commissioned the baseline study for the programme. The assessment was required to establish and verify baseline indicators related to the current food and nutritional status of the project beneficiaries and their ability to respond to climatic shocks. The baseline was conducted in the 7 districts of Nsanje, Zomba and Mulanje under the United Purpose led consortium and in Chikwawa, Mwanza, Neno, Mzimba North and Mzimba South under the Christian Aid led consortium The overall objective of the assignment was to carry out a baseline study for the “Pro-ACT programme” in order to determine the pre-project situation against major project indicators. This would provide a benchmark on which to formulate project targets and a basis for assessing project milestones during and impact after implementation. [83 pages] Read More...

Qualitative Assessment of the Effectiveness of Gender Transformative Programming on Changing Gender and Social Norms and Women’s Empowerment

The “Win-Win for Gender, Agriculture and Nutrition: Testing a Gender-Transformative Approach from Asia in Africa” is a project aimed at establishing a comparison between a gender-transformative model to achieve gender equality (the “EKATA” model), and a gender-mainstreamed approach in the agriculture sector (“Gender-Light model”), in which basic activities around gender are integrated into a program whose principle focus and measures of success are women’s economic empowerment through agriculture and micro-enterprise development.

The qualitative research is using in-depth interviews and Focus Group Discussions(FGDs) of a subset of women and their spouses who are participating in the program. For the in-depth interviews, 30 people (22 women and their spouses) were selected and are followed every year to document different pathways to empowerment. They were randomly selected from a strata of all women interviewed at baseline to reflect different social economic and marital status. On the other hand, 106 people (45 men and 61 women) participated in a total of ten FGDs. [42 pages]
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Women and Agriculture Project Gender Analysis Report

In Tanzania, agriculture is the largest and most important sector of the economy. Majority of the country’s population which lives in rural areas relies heavily on agriculture. The sector accounts for about half of the national income, three quarters of merchandise exports and is source of food and provides employment opportunities to about 80 percent of Tanzanians. Agriculture also has linkages with the non-farm sectors through forward linkages to agro-processing; consumption and export; provides raw materials to industries; and a market for manufactured goods. Consequently, agriculture has a pivotal role in economic growth, and is directly linked with sustainable development and poverty reduction. Gender differences are a significant attribute in agriculture, from access, control and ownership of land to marketing of raw and processed produce. In Tanzania, despite constitutional proclamations of gender equality and many laws that promote equal opportunities for both men and women, it remains the case that on both smallholder farms and large plantations, men and women carry out different types of work, have different levels of access to resources, and are unequally rewarded for their contributions to the agricultural system, with women typically having less access and lower incomes (Rubin, 2010). [75 pages] Read More...

COSACA II

The following report provides an independent review of COSACA II, a consortium comprising Concern, Oxfam, Save the Children, and CARE in Mozambique responsible for implementing a DFID, Sida, OFDA, and ECHO funded drought recovery for the period July 2016 – June 2017 (July 2016 – March 2017 for DFID). The project covers seven provinces: Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala, Zambezia, Manica,Tete and Maputo with the primary aim of ensuring that drought affected households have adequate access to food and water to meet their daily essential needs, as well as access to market integrated livelihood activities which support their children’s well-being. COSACA was created in order to leverage the unique technical skills and geographical reach of each agency in order to more effectively coordinate humanitarian preparedness and response, and to improve members’ capacity to respond within 72 hours of a disaster. Each of the Consortium agencies has a committed, long-term presence in Mozambique, and this brings expertise and experience working in various provinces across the country. Together, they are currently delivering programmes focused on Food Security and Livelihoods (FSL), Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH), Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), child protection, education, health and nutrition. [76 pages] Read More...

Business-Based Solutions in Humanitarian Crises: Lessons from Zimbabwe

In response to heightened food insecurity in Zimbabwe, Crown Agents and CARE, through the Grain Trade Market Facility, utilised existing market structures to avoid a potentially devastating food disaster. Using innovative solutions that brought together both the public and private sectors the programme ensured that people could meet their basic food needs through mobile money transfers. Utilising private sector systems increased access to funds and guaranteed market demand. This improved the availability of grain nationwide, maintained price stability and ensured vulnerable households were able to meet their basic food needs. Read More...

Integrated WASH, Shelter, and Protection Response to Newly Arrived South Sudanese Refugees and Host Communities in Uganda: Endline Report

Uganda is hosting 1,154,352 refugees, of which 785,104 are South Sudanese1 . Oxfam, CARE, CEFORD and Save the Children have implemented a WASH, Shelter, Protection and Early Education programme targeting new South Sudanese arrivals in refugee settlements in West Nile Region of Uganda. This internal evaluation is verification that the programme has broadly met its intended objectives. [68 pages] Read More...

Implementation of Social Accountability Framework (ISAF) Endline Report

This is the End of Project Evaluation for CARE’s Implementation of Social Accountability Framework (ISAF) Project. ISAF was implemented in four target provinces (Ratank Kiri, Mondul Kiri, Koh Kong and Kampot) over 36 months (2016-2018). ISAF aimed to reduce poverty through democratic, inclusive and equitable local governance and more accessible and equitable public service delivery. ISAF worked with local NGOs (LNGOs) that were provided grants through the project and citizens of the four targeted provinces who received improved services(commune, health centres and primary schools). [44 pages] Read More...

Kore Lavi: School Feeding Program How to Improve Program and Lower Costs

This report is based off of fieldwork conducted between May 29th and August 9th in Haiti of Jade Womack, a Master’s student in Applied Economics Management at Cornell University under the Cornell-CARE collaboration. The author, or referred to as “researcher,” was interning on behalf of CARE USA in CARE Haiti as a Research Fellow for the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University. The findings of this report do not represent the views of CARE USA, CARE Haiti, or Cornell University and should be considered solely the work and views of the researcher. The researcher investigated the School Feeding Program in Thomassique and Cerca La Source which was part of the SO2 component of the Kore Lavi Program–a USAID sponsored program enacted by CARE Haiti. The report includes detailed information on the demographics of vendors, agriculture in Haiti, profit margins, cost reduction calculations, vendor perceptions, and recommendations. The researcher had two guiding questions, the first as to what could be improved in the program, and the second on how to reduce the cost of the program. The researcher interviewed vendors from 3 of the participating 6 schools: NGE, PDR, and RiO which are all in Thomassique region. Read More...

Mainstreaming of Social Accountability in The Emergency Labor Intensive Investment Project: Evaluation Study

Social accountability is one of the forms of accountability resulting from the activities of citizens and civil society organizations (CSOs) to hold government agencies accountable. The World Bank was the first to use the term “social accountability” (SA) to describe a set of procedures and mechanisms that enable citizens, civil society, and mass media to hold the government and public sector officials accountable. The term also represents the procedures adopted by the government, CSOs, mass media, and other social stakeholders to promote or facilitate such efforts. Therefore, SA is a form of social participation that transforms communities from being service receivers to a key partner throughout all stages, including needs assessment, pre-planning of activities, monitoring of service delivery, up to evaluation and improvement.

Social accountability aims at enabling stakeholders to access the best services. As such, it relies on mechanisms for giving voice and participation. Over the past decade there were many examples that revealed that citizens could express their viewpoints and actively participate in urging the public sector to be more responsive and accountable.
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Assistance for Damrey and Flood affected communities in the Central Region of Vietnam

On 2 November 2017, Typhoon Damrey gained strength and headed to Vietnam with wind speeds of up 90km/hour. The Vietnamese Government sent the alert to the Central provinces to guide the emergency response. 35,000 villagers in high- risk areas were evacuated to safe places before the arrival of the typhoon. On 4 November 2017, the Typhoon made landfall with winds of up to 135km/h, wreaking havoc in the central and south-central areas. The Vietnamese Central Committee of Disaster Prevention and Control announced the risk of the disaster was at level 3. During its 16 hours in Vietnam, the typhoon blew the roofs off thousands of houses, felled trees and electricity poles across the southern coastline and caused the destruction of thousands of homes. The typhoon caused flooding in 15 provinces across central Vietnam.
Following to the typhoon, CARE International in Vietnam (CARE), as a core member of Disaster Management Working Group (DMWG) joined the Rapid Needs Assessment in the two worst affected provinces, including Thua Thien Hue and Quang Nam. The assessments revealed widespread damage to housing, infrastructure, WASH and livelihoods.
CARE was successful in mobilizing AUD $400,000 funding from DFAT to provide support for affected populations in four communes of Dai Loc District (Quang Nam Province) and Quang Dien District (in Thua Thien Hue Province). This funding enabled recovery activities to take place from the beginning of January to the end of September 2018, with a particular focus on addressing the different needs of both men and women for livelihood recovery and WASH. [33 pages] Read More...

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