Tetum

Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan (HAMORIS – 2017-2021) Midterm Report and Summary CI Timor-Leste

The Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan Sira (HAMORIS) project is funded by the Australian Government and implemented by CARE International Timor-Leste. Focused on the municipalities of Ermera and Covalima, the project aims to address the high number of women who die during childbirth in Timor-Leste, which has one of the highest rates of maternal death in the world, by improving their access to and use of quality maternal health services. The HAMORIS project was launched in July 2017 and has been extended until June 2022. This is the midterm report and findings. Please also find a summary in English as well as Tetum. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 Timor-Leste

An outbreak of COVID-19 would be devastating for Timor-Leste. As one of the world’s least developed countries and the poorest country in southeast Asia, it is feared that the pandemic would easily overwhelm the country’s weak healthcare system. In international and regional rankings Timor-Leste is assessed as having weak health systems, low capacity to respond to infectious disease outbreak, high rates of underlying health issues that increase risk of COVID-19 mortality and overall high COVID-19 risk.4 Timor-Leste is ranked second of 25 countries in the Asia Pacific in terms of risk for COVID-19.5 The 2020 INFORM Global Risk Index identifies that, Timor-Leste is most at risk for; access to healthcare, existing health conditions and food insecurity.6 Current gaps in the capacity to effectively respond to the virus include under-resourced healthcare facilities, limited communication channels to communities, lack of adequate water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH), difficult geographical terrains, and widespread poverty. Systemic gender inequality and the exclusion of marginalised groups from leadership positions and decision making, service provision, and access to and control of resources, would exacerbate the impact of the pandemic on vulnerable groups.

A COVID-19 outbreak would disproportionately affect women and girls, including their education, food security and nutrition, health, livelihoods, and protection. Timor-Leste is ranked at 111 out of the 187 countries in the UN Gender Inequality Index (GII) and has one of the highest rates of GBV.7 In Timor-Leste, women are often the primary caregivers in the family, placing them at heightened risk of infection. Women’s unpaid workloads may increase with the need to care for sick family members and children at home due to school closures. Maternal, sexual and reproductive health services may be less available as resources are diverted to respond to the pandemic, putting women at greater risk of maternal mortality and disability. As with all crises, there is an increased risk of gender-based violence (GBV) in a country where pre-existing rates of GBV are already extremely high. Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis Report: Disaster Ready Project, Timor-Leste 2018

Timor-Leste is subject to a range of disaster events, including rapid onset high winds, landslides, flash floods and minor earthquakes, which tend to happen frequently but have a limited humanitarian impact. Higher risk natural disasters include slow onset events such as prolonged rains or droughts, which are particularly severe in La Niña/El Niño years, increasingly affecting communities throughout Timor-Leste. These emergencies are likely to increase in frequency and/ or severity in coming years as a result of climate change. With approximately seventy percent (70%) of the population living in rural areas, reliant on subsistence agriculture and with poor access to infrastructure, services and markets, communities are highly vulnerable to disasters. The high prevalence of malnutrition and inadequate water and sanitation pose additional challenges and impact on communities’ ability to prepare for natural disaster and adapt to the changing environment.

The primary goal of the Gender and Power Analysis is to gain a broader understanding of gender and power dynamics that will affect the success of the Disaster READY project. The objectives of the analysis are to:

- understand how gender and social norms and beliefs influence women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify gender inequalities and harmful social and cultural norms that affect women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify positive trends, factors and role models that can be used to promote and drive transformation of harmful gender norms and practices;
- identify actions that Disaster READY can implement to promote equality in women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- apply the analysis to strengthen existing activities and ensure that they are not gender blind.

Disaster READY is a 4.5 year, $42.5m Australian Government funded program to help Timor-Leste and Pacific Island communities prepare for and build resilience to disasters.

Implemented by Australian NGOS with their local partners, Disaster READY has a specific focus on strengthening the ability of local communities and organisations in the Indo Pacific region, with an initial focus in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, PNG and Timor-Leste.
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