Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

Looking for something specific? You can filter the evaluations using the dropdown menus on the right side of the screen.

If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

Food and Nutrition Security Programme (FNSP) in Malawi (2015 – 2022): Midline Evaluation

Over 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger and two billion do not meet their micro nutrient requirements (Global Nutrition Report, 2016). While the global starving population has gone down in recent decades, the number of people suffering from hunger in sub-Saharan Africa today is higher than ever. Malnutrition is particularly prevalent in developing countries, where it has an impact not only upon the development prospects of an entire country, but also of each individual affected. If a child does not receive sufficient nutrients up to its second year, i.e. over its first 1,000 days beginning with the early embryonic phase, the impact on growth, mental faculties and therefore learning and work¬ing potential will endure a lifetime.

This midline survey outlines important information to understand whether the project is on track. The overall objective was improving the nutrition situation of women of reproductive age (15-49) and children under two (6-23 months) in Dedza and Salima. This report outlines how well the project is meeting this goal. Read More...

Food and Nutrition Security, Enhanced Resilience: Nutrition Baseline Survey Malawi

Over 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger and two billion do not meet their micro nutrient requirements (Global Nutrition Report, 2016). While the global starving population has gone down in recent decades, the number of people suffering from hunger in sub-Saharan Africa today is higher than ever. Malnutrition is particularly prevalent in developing countries, where it has an impact not only upon the development prospects of an entire country, but also of each individual affected. If a child does not receive sufficient nutrients up to its second year, i.e. over its first 1,000 days beginning with the early embryonic phase, the impact on growth, mental faculties and therefore learning and work¬ing potential will endure a lifetime.

The German Ministry of Economic Co-operation and Development (BMZ) launched an Initiative “On World – No Hunger” to improve food and nutrition security (https://www.bmz.de/webapps/hunger/index.html#/de). Within this initiative GIZ implements the program “Food and nutrition security, enhanced resilience” in 11 countries in Africa and Asia.

The project‘s main target group includes women of childbearing age, pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers and infants. The project‘s objective is to improve the nutritional situation of approximately 880000 women, 235000 young children and 4.000 households. Structural measures to combat hunger and malnutrition, particularly among mothers and young children, are one of the most effective ways of investing in the future of a society. Read More...

Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) Phase-III Final Evaluation Report

Bangladesh is frequently cited as one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. Considering these scenarios of climate change risks and as an initiative to address the effects of climate change, CARE International in Bangladesh implemented the project “Where the Rain Falls (WtRF)”. Generously funded by the Prince Albert II Foundation, WtRF Phase III aimed at improving the resilience of targeted vulnerable and marginalized communities to the impacts of increasing variability of rainfall patterns by promoting CARE’s SuPER (Sustainable, Profitable, Equitable and Resilient) agriculture approach through community based adaptation. This intervention was designed building on earlier phases of Where the Rain Falls project (Phase I & II).

The main objective of this evaluation is to critically review program performance based on the indicators set out in the logical framework. The project is also keen to know how it is helping communities (especially those who are rain fed farmers) to address climatic vulnerabilities in a gender friendly manner. As the project will come to its end in February 2019, CARE Bangladesh planned to have an independent evaluation to see the results in comparison with the baseline. Read More...

Souqona Project: Midterm Evaluation

Souqona is a five years project that was launched in April 2016, as part of the program “Palestinian Farmers Connecting to Markets” launched by the Australian Government, which constitutes the third phase of the Australian Middle East NGO Cooperation Agreement (AMENCA) programme in the oPt. Souqona aims at increasing income, agency, and market opportunity for Palestinian Farmers through growth in pro-poor agribusiness and market development. The project is seeking to better connect women and men Palestinian vegetables, dairy and seed farmers to markets. It is implemented in 23 locations in three governorates located in the Northern Areas of West Bank (Nablus, Jenin, and Tubas).

Advance Consulting Services was commissioned to undertake a midterm review of the project to determine the relevance, efficiency, achievement of results, and sustainability of the first phase of the project that will end in March 20191. Read More...

INCOME, AGENCY AND OPPORTUNITY FOR PALESTINIAN FARMERS: SOUQONA PROJECT BASELINE ASSESSMENT

The Souqona project was launched in April 2016, with funds from the Australian Government as part of the program “Palestinian Farmers Connecting to Markets,” which constitutes the third phase of the Australian Middle East NGO Cooperation Agreement (AMENCA) program in the occupied Palestinian territory. This project is implemented by a consortium of three organizations: Care International West Bank & Gaza as the leading party, The Applied Research Institute - Jerusalem (ARIJ), and the International Centre for Agriculture and Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA).

Souqona’s main goal is to increase income, agency, and market opportunity for female and male Palestinian farmers through growth in pro-poor agribusiness and market development.

In order to lay down the benchmarks for project objectives, Care International commissioned Al-Sahel Company for Institutional Development and Communication (Al-Sahel) to conduct a baseline study. Read More...

The Nawiri Project: Stories and Best Practices

The Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project is a 36-month intervention on maternal and child nutrition. The project targets to reach 94,435 children under 5 years; 127,065 women of reproductive age; 42,000 adolescent girls and 20,000 men in the Siaya County. The project is executed in partnership among three consortium members; CARE (the coordinator), Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) and the Kisumu Medical and Education Trust (KMET) in Siaya County with funding support from the European Union, the Austrian Development Cooperation (ADC) and CARE.
The overall objective of the project is to contribute to improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN), including nutrition of women of reproductive age in Siaya County. In order to increase the nutritional status of children under the age of five and of women of reproductive age, the project aims to alleviate the most severe obstacles of poor MIYCN in Siaya County. Read More...

Manual for Male Involvement in Maternal and Infant Nutrition

Men’s involvement in the health of women and children is considered an important avenue for addressing gender influences on maternal and newborn health. Over the past 20 years infant and under-five mortality rates have been on the rise in Kenya, with current poor infant feeding practices contributing to more than 10,000 deaths each year.

In order to improve these practices, it is essential that mothers, caregivers, and family members have accurate information, as well as support to overcome barriers. For instance, engaging male partners in breastfeeding promotion and education, as well as providing fathers with knowledge and skills for optimal nutrition practices, including breastfeeding, has been shown to positively impact exclusive breastfeeding rates.

This training manual is highly participatory and relies on modelling activities, integration of critical assessment of activities throughout the training, called “Stepping Out,” and ultimately application and practice (Teach Backs). Read More...

Kisumu Integrated Family Health Project: Endterm Review Final Report

The Kisumu Integrated Family Health Project (KIFHP) is a three year project (November 2014 – October 2017) funded by the European Union (EU) with co-funding from the Austrian Development Cooperation (ADA) and CARE Austria. The project is implemented by CARE International in Kenya (CIK) in partnership with the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) and Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK). The project is implemented in Kisumu urban slums of Manyatta and Nyalenda and works closely with Kisumu County Government under Kisumu East Sub-County. The project aims to primarily contribute to achieving sustainable development goal 3 (SDG)and former MDGs 4 and 5 a +b-“Reduce by two thirds the under-five mortality rate”, “Reduce by three quarters the maternal mortality ratio” and “Achieve universal access to reproductive health”. The overall objective of the evaluation was to establish the results that have been achieved in the three years (November 2014‐October 2017) of implementation and the resultant impact this has had on the target beneficiaries. Read More...

Kisumu Integrated Family Health Project: Midterm Review Report

CARE International in Kenya (CIK) in partnership with the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) and Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) have been implementing a 3 year project in Kisumu urban slums of Manyatta and Nyalenda and works closely with Kisumu County Government under Kisumu East Sub-County. The overall objective of the KIFHP is to Improve Maternal and Child Health, Sexual Reproductive Health, Family Planning and nutritional status of communities living within Kisumu slums.

The specific objectives of the Midterm evaluation were: to assess the effectiveness of project interventions, assess the efficiency of approaches used in implementation of project activities, assess the project implementation progress at mid-term level and its relevance within the prevailing context of devolved health system of governance and assess project sustainability mechanism. Read More...

Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project: Midterm Evaluation

The Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project is a 36-months intervention on maternal and child nutrition. The project is executed in partnership between CARE (the coordinator), Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) and the Kisumu Medical and Education Trust (KMET) in Siaya County with funding support from the European Commission (EC), the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and CARE. The overall objective of the project is to contribute to improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN), including nutrition of women of reproductive age, in Siaya County.

The specific objectives of the mid-term evaluation of the Nawiri Project were to (1) assess the process and progress in project implementation and achievement of expected results, (2) provide an opportunity for an in-depth analysis and understanding on any unintended or intended outcomes, (3) as well as provide an opportunity for learning by project teams, partners and other stakeholders. Read More...

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