Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

Looking for something specific? You can filter the evaluations using the dropdown menus on the right side of the screen.

If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

A Qualitative study comparing the effects and outcomes of HIV-related interventions for Nepalese migrants – at source, transit and destination

The qualitative study, commissioned by Care Nepal, sought to explore the effects and outcomes of the EMPHASIS project, launched four years ago to reduce HIV and AIDS vulnerability among cross border migrants; and to influence national and regional policies relating to safe mobility through evidence generated regionally. The project, working along a continuum of source, transit, and destination areas, provides HIV prevention and treatment services to migrants and their families. Additionally, the project partners with local stakeholders to ensure safe passage of migrants on transit besides providing other support services. The study was, thus, designed to assess the influence of the project in addressing HIV vulnerabilities, and at the same to enquire into whether inter-country passage has been made safer for migrants. The study aimed to answer the following research questions: a) How has the EMPHASIS intervention impacted HIV vulnerabilities among Nepali migrants, b) What are the qualitative differences between HIV related attitudes and behaviors between migrants reached at destination and their spouses reached at source and those not reached either at source or destination, c) What are the qualitative differences between HIV
related attitudes and behaviors between spouses who have been reached by the project and those who have not been reached by the project, d)) What are the benefits and barriers of support services provided to migrants for safe mobility and empowerment. The study was conducted among 60 migrants and family members, and 5 key informants in four locations- two at the destination site of Delhi and two at the source site of Nepal. In depth interviews by trained researchers were conducted with the help of semi structured interview guides. [39 Pages] Read More...

Evaluation of Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services (EMPHASIS)

EMPHASIS is a 5 year project funded by Big Lottery Fund, UK, which was initiated in August 2009 and is due to conclude in July 2014. It has been implemented in Nepal, India and Bangladesh to address both HIV and AIDS vulnerability and safe mobility issues of cross border migrant populations. Its overall goal has been to contribute to reduction of vulnerability of mobile populations (particularly women) to HIV infection across selected cross border regions within India, Bangladesh and Nepal. There has however, appropriately, been an increased focus on safe mobility issues within the last two years of the project. The three main outcomes of the project focus on: 1) the development of an effective and integrated cross border model of HIV prevention, care, treatment and support to benefit mobile populations and their families and target groups at source, transit and destination locations who are vulnerable to acquiring and spreading HIV and AIDS, 2) building the capacity of partner organizations (including regional authorities, government agencies, border police, customs officials, research institutions, NGO, Community Based Organizations [CBO] and key stakeholders) to deliver improved and integrated services to mobile populations vulnerable to HIV, 3) Increasing recognition of the vulnerabilities of mobile populations and demonstration of ways to address them in source and destination communities that will inform policies and produce evidence based advocacy messages with which to lobby government stakeholders. The aim of this evaluation is to assess the project according to its three outcomes areas and to assess the effectiveness and relevance of different interventions. One week visits to India, Nepal and Bangladesh were conducted at the end of January/ early February 2014 by a team of three people, during which interviews and focus group discussion were conducted, and a Lickert Scale tool administered. These visits were then supplemented by some additional meetings in Bangladesh in April, following the production of the first draft report. An endline study was conducted in parallel to the evaluation, and its conclusions are also drawn upon in this report. [88 Pages] Read More...

Women, Migration and Development: Investing in the future

On the 17th and 18th of July 2014, the International Conference on Women, Migration and Development: Investing In The Future was convened by CARE
International and hosted at the Overseas Development Institute in London. The objectives of the conference were to: 1) highlight the challenges faced by vulnerable migrant workers, especially women, 2) advocate, based on CARE and others’ experiences, for strategies, policy and practical responses which need to be taken to protect migrant workers’ well-being, particularly with respect to safe mobility and access to healthcare, 3) recognize women migrants’ contribution as economic actors and advocate for policies and planning processes that ensure their protection, 4) advocate for recognition of the role of migration as a key development enabler in the post-2015 development agenda. CARE and ODI presented the findings from their five year EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) programme in South Asia. EMPHASIS, a project which started as a HIV and health intervention, was successful in surfacing and addressing other aspects such as safety and dignity of migrants, economic empowerment, financial inclusion and safe remittances, access to education for migrants’ children, and women’s empowerment. The conference was a response to the call at the May 2014 Stockholm Global Forum for Migration and Development both for civil society/government cooperation around regional systemic approaches to migration and for urgently needed programmatic data and evidence on migration. EMPHASIS is considered among very few projects globally which comprehensively cover the migration experience from source, through transit, to destination countries. The EMPHASIS Learning Series report, which provides a comprehensive overview of
the EMPHASIS programme, was launched during the conference. [5 Pages] Read More...

CROSS-BORDER MIGRATION INTO INDIA AND DEVELOPMENT – Advocacy Paper

The migration discourse has not remained confined to focusing upon the mobility of people from low income countries to high income countries. There has been growing attention to migration from higher-income countries to lower-income countries. The current literature, however, is increasingly taking note of human movements within any of the two regions – the higher income countries and the lower income countries, also described as the global north and the global south respectively. Based on the level of development of the countries of origin and destination, the United Nations has therefore identified a typology of two inter-regional and two intra-regional streams of contemporary international migration: south-north and north-south, south-south and north-north (United Nations 2013). This typology also subsumes the category of a transit country in its roles of being an origin and a destination country at the same time. [26 Pages] Read More...

Social inclusion through team sports and education: sport for development

Dysfunctional family relationships make the social integration of children into a regular school career more difficult and put a strain on them, and accordingly also reduce the children's future prospects. One of the most important prevention and protection mechanisms for the successful development of children is therefore their inclusion in the public school system. Unfortunately, parents and schools do not offer the children the support they need to successfully complete primary and secondary school (primary school / primary school grades 1 to 9 and secondary school another 4 years). The premature drop-out rate from school for Roma children and other disadvantaged / vulnerable children in Bijeljina is high. Diverse efforts are necessary for disadvantaged / vulnerable children to remain successfully in the Bosnian school system. Children need separate learning support, an incentive to attend school regularly and to improve their social skills. Parents' awareness of education must also be heightened and communication between home and school intensified. At the same time, prejudices on the part of the school (and the majority society) against children in the relevant settlement must be broken down; but at the same time the fear of the Roma community about state institutions must be reduced. The "Sports for Social Change" project addresses all of these interfaces and has already achieved far-reaching successes through the innovative use of football as an inclusion method in combination with non-formal educational offers, which must now be consolidated and expanded. Read More...

GENDER AND COVID-19 VACCINES Listening to women-focused organizations in Asia and the Pacific

More than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed across at least 176 countries, with over 1.7 billion doses administered worldwide. Combating the pandemic requires equitable distribution of safe and effective vaccines, however, women and girls are impacted by gaps both in the supply side and the demand side that hamper equitable distribution of the vaccine. Evidence reveals that 75 per cent of all vaccines have gone to just 10 countries, and only 0.3 per cent of doses have been administered in low-income countries. Very few of COVID-19 vaccines are going to those most vulnerable. The vaccine rollout in Asia and the Pacific has been relatively slow and staggered amid secondary waves of the virus. India, despite being the largest vaccine developer, has only vaccinated 3 per cent of the population and continues to battle a variant outbreak that, at its peak, was responsible for more than half of the world’s daily COVID-19 cases and set a record-breaking pace of about 400,000 cases per day.5However, the small Pacific nation of Nauru, reported a world record administering the first dose to 7,392 people, 108 per cent of the adult population within four weeks. Bhutan also set an example by vaccinating 93 per cent of its eligible population in less than two weeks. That success could be at risk, given the situation in India and the suspended export of vaccines. Read More...

Every Voice Counts (EVC) Program Third National Advocacy Conference Position Paper

Since 2016 the EVC Program is implemented by CARE and its partners, namely Afghan Women Resource Center-AWRC, Women and Children Legal Research Foundation-WCLRF and Human Rights, Research and Advocacy Consortium-HRRAC. We work in eighty targeted communities in four provinces namely Balkh, Khost, Parwan and Kabul. EVC is a program that invests in social cohesion and community development, while contributing to women and girls’ empowerment, an enabling environment, civil society strengthening and government responsiveness through different interventions such as capacity development, rights awareness raising, lobby and advocacy, social accountability, research and knowledge management. As a result, there are increases in girls’ access to education (re-enrolment of girls at school), women access to local health services, women participation in local decision making processes (e.g. in community development councils), women recruitment in local official structures and community groups, and in renovation, approval and start of construction for new schools and class rooms, clinics and hospital in some of the target areas. We see positive changes in teaching relations and methods for students, improved interaction between patients and health clinic staff, as well as an increase in teacher and clinics’ staff attendance, and in monitoring by senior officials from health and education local services. And finally worth mentioning that here is a decline in harmful practices, thanks to community male members support in the target communities. Read More...

EXAMINING WOMEN AND GIRLS’ SAFE SPACES (WGSS) IN HUMANITARIAN CONTEXTS: Research Findings from Northwest Syria and South Sudan

Gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian contexts represents a global issue of grave concern, disproportionately affecting women and girls. In light of its detrimental impact on the health, well-being and development of survivors, the international community has placed a strong priority on combatting and responding to GBV in all its forms.
Women and Girls’ Safe Spaces (WGSS) are among the most widely implemented GBV prevention and response programming interventions globally. In spite of their popularity and potential to increase the well-being, safety, and empowerment of women and girls, there is a lack of rigorous evidence regarding the role of these spaces in the lives of participants. Building an evidence base is particularly crucial in order to understand the impact and effectiveness of WGSS as an intervention and determine ways in which existing programming can be adapted to increase overall quality.
In response to the crucial need for evidence around WGSS programming globally, CARE USA conducted a study to examine the effectiveness of WGSS in the lives of women and girls in two conflict-affected settings, Northwest Syria and South Sudan. These locations are particularly relevant for this research as the selected study sites are home to a large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs), and are settings in which women and girls face a significant risk of experiencing GBV. These contexts are also ones in which CARE has existing WGSS interventions in place. Read More...

Rapid Needs Assessment Gaza May/June 2021

CARE conducted a rapid needs assessment in Gaza between May 28 and June 3, 2021 to understand people's evolving needs in the crisis there. This graphic underlines what they found, with a survey of 62 people, including 68% women, 32% men, and 16% people with disabilities. Read More...

Etude de Base en eau, Hygiene Assainissement et Nutrition

The centrally managed USAID / Washington WASHplus project, led by FHI360 with CARE USA and Winrock International, as key partners, creates and supports interventions that lead to improvements in Water, Hygiene and Sanitation. 'Sanitation and explores and encourages innovation in the WASH sector, including the integration of WASH into related sectors such as nutrition. The report is 66 pages long. Read More...

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