Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

Looking for something specific? You can filter the evaluations using the dropdown menus on the right side of the screen.

If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

Synthese Analyse Rapide Genre – Est du Cameroun

La crise en RCA et l’afflux de refugies n’a pas changé les rôles et relations ci-dessus. Les seuls changements positif relevé est l’existence de plus de main d’œuvre pour le travail de la terre. Par contre tous les groupes consultes ont noté plusieurs impacts négatifs qui alimentent des tensions perceptibles entre les refugies et leurs communautés hôtes parmi lesquels:

- Accès aux soins de santé : les refugies sont soignés gratuitement dans les centres de sante existants, et les autochtones doivent payer leurs soins, longues files d’attentes au centre de sante car les refugies ont la priorité
- Accès à l’EHA: les refugies disposent de plusieurs forages alors que leurs forages sont soit non fonctionnels soit inexistant ou ne suffisent pas. Ils sont « obligés de payer l’eau dans le forage des anciens refugiés et/ou d’utiliser l’eau des rivières polluées par les défécations des réfugiés ».
- Accès aux produits de base sur les marchés : avec l’arrivée des refugies, les prix des denrées ont augmenté significativement, exemple la tasse de couscous de manioc est passée de 500 à 2000Fcfa),
- Pression sur les ressources en eau et le pâturage par les refugies et leurs animaux. Destruction des champs de cultures par les troupeaux
- Multiplication de cas de vols : sentiment d’insécurité au sein de la population autochtone qui attribue la recrudescence des vols à la présence des refugiés Read More...

Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan (HAMORIS – 2017-2021) Midterm Report and Summary CI Timor-Leste

The Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan Sira (HAMORIS) project is funded by the Australian Government and implemented by CARE International Timor-Leste. Focused on the municipalities of Ermera and Covalima, the project aims to address the high number of women who die during childbirth in Timor-Leste, which has one of the highest rates of maternal death in the world, by improving their access to and use of quality maternal health services. The HAMORIS project was launched in July 2017 and has been extended until June 2022. This is the midterm report and findings. Please also find a summary in English as well as Tetum. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis – Middle East North Africa (MENA)

The COVID-19 pandemic and efforts at mitigating the virus’ spread in recent months have heightened the insecurity, psychosocial distress, economic vulnerability, gender inequality, and deprivation that already existed in countries in the Middle East and beyond. While men appear to have worse outcomes when infected with the coronavirus, women and girls are being deeply impacted– and fragile gains in women’s workforce participation are in jeopardy.

Refugees and the displaced, the majority of them located in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, are now faced with the COVID-19 pandemic and economically damaging efforts at its mitigation. Fragile gains in women’s workforce participation are at risk, gender-based violence is on the rise, and women’s voices are going unheeded. CARE’s soon-to-be-released Rapid Gender Analysis gathers together data from its country offices in MENA and beyond to provide a sobering picture of the pandemic’s impact on women and girls. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 Timor-Leste

An outbreak of COVID-19 would be devastating for Timor-Leste. As one of the world’s least developed countries and the poorest country in southeast Asia, it is feared that the pandemic would easily overwhelm the country’s weak healthcare system. In international and regional rankings Timor-Leste is assessed as having weak health systems, low capacity to respond to infectious disease outbreak, high rates of underlying health issues that increase risk of COVID-19 mortality and overall high COVID-19 risk.4 Timor-Leste is ranked second of 25 countries in the Asia Pacific in terms of risk for COVID-19.5 The 2020 INFORM Global Risk Index identifies that, Timor-Leste is most at risk for; access to healthcare, existing health conditions and food insecurity.6 Current gaps in the capacity to effectively respond to the virus include under-resourced healthcare facilities, limited communication channels to communities, lack of adequate water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH), difficult geographical terrains, and widespread poverty. Systemic gender inequality and the exclusion of marginalised groups from leadership positions and decision making, service provision, and access to and control of resources, would exacerbate the impact of the pandemic on vulnerable groups.

A COVID-19 outbreak would disproportionately affect women and girls, including their education, food security and nutrition, health, livelihoods, and protection. Timor-Leste is ranked at 111 out of the 187 countries in the UN Gender Inequality Index (GII) and has one of the highest rates of GBV.7 In Timor-Leste, women are often the primary caregivers in the family, placing them at heightened risk of infection. Women’s unpaid workloads may increase with the need to care for sick family members and children at home due to school closures. Maternal, sexual and reproductive health services may be less available as resources are diverted to respond to the pandemic, putting women at greater risk of maternal mortality and disability. As with all crises, there is an increased risk of gender-based violence (GBV) in a country where pre-existing rates of GBV are already extremely high. Read More...

Utilizing Cash and Voucher Assistance within Gender-based Violence Case Management to Support Crisis-Affected Populations in Ecuador: Learning Brief (Arabic)

With support from Sweden’s Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Women's Refugee Commission and CARE partnered to advance the Call to Action Roadmap by strengthening the capacity of GBV and CVA service providers in Ecuador to leverage CVA within case management services in the prevention of and response to GBV for crisis-affected populations.

This project, which spanned September to December 2019, serves as an opportunity to model comprehensive GBV case management in the face of high rates of GBV and to influence how humanitarian and development sectors and their practitioners respond to GBV in Ecuador. CVA has not yet been systematically leveraged to meet the needs of GBV survivors and those at risk (GBV clients). Previous work by CARE has focused on GBV prevention and mitigation in support of local government, women’s rights organizations, and civil society strengthening local policies and frameworks; these efforts will be complemented by this project’s focus on GBV response.

This learning brief was made possible by funding support from the Government of Sweden provided through the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. Read More...

What Does Gender-Sensitive Cash and Voucher Assistance Look Like?

CARE is committed to being “cash ready” to achieve breakthroughs for women and girls in its cash and voucher assistance (CVA) and to convene other stakeholders on the gendered aspects of CVA. Building that commitment, CARE commissioned a study on gender-sensitive CVA from its own project participants. The study aimed at understanding the:
- Extent to which women, men, boys, and girls have been involved in the design of CVA and the implications of this involvement.
- Potential for CVA to foster positive and sustainable gender roles and relations that contribute to gender equity.
- Gender-related barriers and risks associated with collecting and receiving CVA including social and cultural
attitudes and protection risks. Read More...

Community-Driven Financial Inclusion for the Most Vulnerable Households

The Tat Lan Programme, funded by the Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) in Myanmar was implemented in two phases (2013-15 and 2017-18). The overall goal was to ensure a sustainable increase of food and nutrition security and incomes of participant households in 259 communities in the townships of Myebon, Pauktaw, Kyaukpyu and Minbya in Rakhine State. [24 pages] Read More...

Sociedades Inclusivas e Interculturales Impacto Del Programa

En Ecuador CARE busca combatir la pobreza y la injusticia social que afectan de manera desproporcionada a niñas, adolescentes y mujeres afrodescendientes, indígenas, sobrevivientes de violencia de género, que viven en comunidades afectadas por desastres naturales, el cambio climático y que han sido forzadas a desplazarse de sus comunidades de origen por crisis y conflictos bélicos. Para ello, su enfoque de trabajo consiste en generar alianzas y fortalecer las capacidades de las mujeres, de sus familias, de líderes locales y nacionales y de entidades públicas, con el fin de asegurar una vida libre de violencia y el pleno ejercicio de los derechos humanos al mayor número posible de mujeres y hombres en el país. [46 pages] Read More...

Lend With Care (LWC) Assessment Project Thrive Report

This report is part of LENDWITHCARE (LWC) assessment project and focuses on the evaluation of LWC partner in Zimbabwe, THRIVE Microfinance. The report was prepared by the University of Portsmouth (UoP), partner in the project, after a second wave of a household survey to a sample of THRIVE clients who have been supported by the LWC crowdfunding platform.

The study sample includes 341 new THRIVE clients and 157 non-clients, first interviewed in 2016 (April to June) by a team of interviewers recruited from a local university. The second wave of interviews took place approximately one year later (June to August), when some of the clients were starting to repay their third loan. 245 clients and 110 non-clients were available to be interviewed. [25 pages]
Read More...

SDVC II Social Impact Studies

The study has explored dietary diversity, milk consumption, and perception of nutrition, hand washing and hygiene practices of SDVC project participants of four upazila namely Kaunia, Badargonj, Shajadpur and Gabtoli of three districts of Northern part of Bangladesh. For this topic a total 6 FGDs and 12 key informant interviews have conducted with 84 women group members of SDVC project. The group members and DFT center have selected based on length of membership and duration of installment of DFT. (15 pages) Read More...

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