Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

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If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

CARE Gender Analysis Afghanistan July 2020

Women in Afghanistan face considerable socio-economic, political and power barriers. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the country – decades of conflict, poverty and conservative patriarchal norms limit Afghan women and girls’ freedom of movement, decision-making power and access to health, education, and other basic services and resources. The situation is more dire for women and girls in IDP settlements and contexts. Even though the current Afghan government is publicly committed to women’s rights and empowerment, women continue to face significant gender-based discrimination, bias and violence.

In line with the CARE global strategy, CARE Afghanistan considers gender equality and women empowerment as a primary mission. Promoting a life free from violence and tackling and reducing gender-based violence (GBV) are key strategies for CARE and, with this analysis, CARE Afghanistan intends to explore gender roles and responsibilities and power dynamics within internally displaced person (IDP), returnee and host communities in Herat and Badghis provinces. This research engaged 61 people in key informant and in-depth interviews from Herat and Badghis provinces including community members, community leaders, and representatives from government offices and NGOs. The findings from this analysis intend to contribute to and inform humanitarian, civil society, NGO and government authorities in their programming, policy and overall interventions in the target communities.

This research provides clear evidence that women in the target communities experience considerable levels of domestic violence, perpetrated by close relatives and have extremely low levels of awareness of and capacity to access available GBV support and referral services. 100% of female and 75% of male respondents from Badghis, and 75% of female and 89% of male respondents from Herat agreed that women, boys and girls have experienced violence in their communities. Respondents indicated that the main perpetrators of violence across the two provinces are fathers (33% in Herat, 34% in Badghis) and brothers (33% in Herat and 23% in Badghis). In Herat, 16% of respondents reported that husbands were perpetrators whereas in Badghis, mothers were the third most common perpetrator identified at 14% followed by husbands at 8%. It is clear from the results of this research that women experience violence from many more sources than men. Key informants identified poverty, culture and customs, lack of education and illiteracy, migration, unemployment, political insecurity, narcotics and the lack of information about rights and the law among the main causes of violence. Read More...

A Glimpse on Poor and Extreme Poor Pregnant and Lactating Women’s Situation in Sunamganj, amidst COVID-19

The global pandemic COVID19 outbreak has crippled the economy after the nationwide lockdown imposed by the Bangladesh government since the end of March 2020 and has thrown millions of its population into poverty and food insecurity. Sunamganj, district is highly susceptible to natural hazards such as heavy rain, storm, thunderstorm, flash flood, which severely affect their livelihood and food and nutrition security where the COVID19 crisis has speeded up the devastation of daily livelihood. While writing this report the total number of infected corona patients in Sunamganj was 1162 and nine died. To better understand how pregnant and lactating women in the poor and the extremely poor household of Sunamganj district, are experiencing and adapting during this COVID 19 crisis, Collective Impact for Nutrition (CI4N), CARE Bangladesh conducted a rapid mobile-based survey from May 14 to 23, 2020. This report represents unofficial survey findings to keep a finger on the pulse of the food and nutrition security situation in rural Bangladesh. Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis: Mudansa Klimatika iha Ambiente Seguru (MAKA’AS) Project

CARE’s Mudansa Kilimatica iha Ambiente Seguru (MAKA’AS) project aims to build the adaptive capacity of women and men in vulnerable households living in seven sukos in Liquiça District on two highly degraded watersheds. The project goal is to increasing resilience to the impacts of climate change through improved water management and water resource protection, improved land management and agricultural practices and micro-to-meso level processes that support natural resource management at the watershed level. The project will be implemented by a consortium led by CARE with WaterAid and four local partners; Centro do Desenvolvimento da Economia Popular (CDEP), Naroman Timor Foun (NTF), Malaidoi, and Hafoun Timor Lorosae (HTL).

The Gender Analysis found that men and women often shared productive workload, although there were some gender specific activities such as fishing for men and seed storage for women. Men and women share the burden of agricultural work, coffee harvesting and caring for home gardens. However, in terms of the domestic or reproductive sphere there is generally little change from traditional gender roles where women care for children, cook and clean and pay attention to household food security. Men are starting to undertake some household tasks such minding children and collecting water but addressing the burden of work shouldered by women within the household is essential in order to enable them to participate in other community activities. Women’s and men’s roles mean they will be affected differently by climate change with women likely to be more concerned with the health and household food security impacts. Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis Report: Disaster Ready Project, Timor-Leste 2018

Timor-Leste is subject to a range of disaster events, including rapid onset high winds, landslides, flash floods and minor earthquakes, which tend to happen frequently but have a limited humanitarian impact. Higher risk natural disasters include slow onset events such as prolonged rains or droughts, which are particularly severe in La Niña/El Niño years, increasingly affecting communities throughout Timor-Leste. These emergencies are likely to increase in frequency and/ or severity in coming years as a result of climate change. With approximately seventy percent (70%) of the population living in rural areas, reliant on subsistence agriculture and with poor access to infrastructure, services and markets, communities are highly vulnerable to disasters. The high prevalence of malnutrition and inadequate water and sanitation pose additional challenges and impact on communities’ ability to prepare for natural disaster and adapt to the changing environment.

The primary goal of the Gender and Power Analysis is to gain a broader understanding of gender and power dynamics that will affect the success of the Disaster READY project. The objectives of the analysis are to:

- understand how gender and social norms and beliefs influence women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify gender inequalities and harmful social and cultural norms that affect women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- identify positive trends, factors and role models that can be used to promote and drive transformation of harmful gender norms and practices;
- identify actions that Disaster READY can implement to promote equality in women and men's ability to prepare and respond to disasters;
- apply the analysis to strengthen existing activities and ensure that they are not gender blind.

Disaster READY is a 4.5 year, $42.5m Australian Government funded program to help Timor-Leste and Pacific Island communities prepare for and build resilience to disasters.

Implemented by Australian NGOS with their local partners, Disaster READY has a specific focus on strengthening the ability of local communities and organisations in the Indo Pacific region, with an initial focus in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, PNG and Timor-Leste.
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Gender and Power Analysis Report: Water for Women Project, Timor-Leste 2018

This is a Gender and Power Analysis for the Australian Aid DFAT funded, Water for Women (WfW) Project commencing July 2018-December 2022. The project will be implemented in Manufahi, Liquica municipalities of Timor-Leste by a consortium of Water Aid and CARE International, who both have strong country presence.

The project will equip each municipality to lead gender transformative, nutrition-sensitive, inclusive, sustainable WASH services to contribute to improvements in health, gender equality and social inclusion. The project will mainstream gender equality and social inclusion approaches by developing and implementing gender and inclusion responsive national and sub-national platforms. Addressing gender inequalities and social exclusion is fundamental to WASH and is embedded in each of the four outcomes of the project:

- Gender equality and social inclusion integrated into effective national WASH systems.
- Women and men share roles and responsibilities in decision making in the household and at
the community level, with a particular emphasis on WASH.
- Municipalities use gender transformative approaches to deliver nutrition sensitive, inclusive,
sustainable WASH services.
- Strengthened National WASH sector knowledge management and learning systems, including
effective exchange between relevant sectors.

The purpose of Gender and Power Analysis (GPA) was to validate the activities already considered for the project but also to identify gender equality and social inclusion gaps within the WASH sector that could be further strengthened by the project. Read More...

Gender and Power Analysis: Timor-Leste 2013

In October 2012 CARE International in Timor-Leste (CITL) commenced its transition from a project-based way of working, to a program approach. This Gender and Power Analysis provides part of the evidence base for the new programs being developed by CITL as part of the move to a program approach.

This Gender and Power Analysis is based on the findings of publically available secondary research and CITL's own research (gender analyses, baseline surveys and evaluations). The CARE International Gender Network's Good Practices Framework for Gender Analysis (2012) was used to guide the report and the analysis is structured around the three domains of CARE's Women's Empowerment Framework —agency, structures and relations.

This report should complement, but not replace, program and project-specific gender and power analyses.
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Myanmar COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of 7 June 2020, there have been 228 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Myanmar,1 and new cases continue to be confirmed.2 Myanmar’s humanitarian and conflict dynamics, high poverty rate, flow of returning migrants, high numbers of internally displaced people and urban slum-dwellers, and high proportion of workers in the informal sector present a range of challenges in the context of COVID-19. These factors tend to make prevention and control measures more difficult, while also intensifying the potential impacts of a larger outbreak, if it were to occur.
Despite the relatively low number of verified cases within its borders to date, the pandemic has already had an outsized economic impact in Myanmar. Migrant workers, informal sector workers including sex workers, and garment sector workers have all been disproportionately affected. Women in Myanmar have traditionally been under-represented in public decision-making processes, a trend which is continuing in structures established to respond to COVID-19. This means that even as women are disproportionately affected by the crisis, they have less say in how their communities and country respond to it, increasing the risk of a COVID-19 response that does not adequately address the needs and priorities of the most vulnerable women and girls. Read More...

End of Project Evaluation: Support for conflict affected people through strengthening of essential primary health care and protection from gender-based violence

Since 2014, when Iraq experienced a sudden escalation in hostilities, the primary health care sector has sustained widespread destruction, looting of health facilities, reduced or inadequate health staff, and lack of supplies, especially in areas that had been severely impacted by the conflict, such as Anbar & Mosul. Sexual, reproductive and maternal health (SRMH), was severely affected, amongst other things, by poor delivery methods, lack of maternity wards, inadequate pre- and postnatal care, and a high prevalence of anaemia amongst pregnant women.

Against the backdrop of this situation, and following increasing returns of internally displaced persons (IDPs) to their places of habitual residence in retaken areas, CARE, with funding from German Federal Foreign Office (GFFO) has been implementing the project in Duhok, Anbar & Mosul to improve maternal and child health in return areas. The project implementation period was January 01, 2019 to December 31, 2019.

Purpose of the Evaluation
The purpose of this evaluation was to assess post intervention situation of the targeted area against indicators mentioned in the project document. The findings will help CARE to measure the impact of project. The findings will be used to compare the baseline situation with the end-line situation to assess the changes in knowledge, attitudes and practices, of the targeted population and impact of the interventions.

The evaluation identified, and documented lessons learnt and made recommendations for CARE-Iraq and project partners to improve future project implementation as well as strengthen the design of future related projects.

Objectives of the Evaluation
The evaluation was expected to:
1. Assess the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability of the project;
2. Generate lessons that will inform SRMH programming in Iraq and in the broader context of GFFO.

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Pathways endline global report

This 110 page evaluation shows TANGO's endline findings on CARE's Pathways findings from the global ... Read More...

Kutch Livelihood and Education Advancement Project (KLEAP) Endline Report

This endline study was an attempt for measuring the extent to which the stated goals and objectives of the K-LEAP had met and contributed towards increasing the income of the families, thereby resulting in improving the quality of the life. As highlighted across various sections of the report, it was observed that involvement in K-LEAP positively impacted the life of participants and also increased their household income. Various initiatives undertaken as a part of K-LEAP are sustainable and have the potential to be replicated in future. [65 pages] Read More...

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