Agriculture|Natural Resources|Environment

Baseline Assessment for Climate Change Adaptation of Women Smallholders and Cotton Producers

CARE India aims to promote environmentally sound, climate-resilient and inclusive agriculture among cotton producers of Vidarbha region. In pursuance of this aim, it has designed an intervention package that focusses on developing environmentally sound and climate resilient cotton production model plots for demonstration, on the lands of traditionally cotton growing women smallholders in 10 project villages of Jalgaon Jamod block of Buldhana district. To further accelerate the effectiveness of the project intervention, CARE plans to work with different stake holders like women Self Help Groups, Farmers’ Groups and men within households and communities, government functionaries, and market actors who collectively form important components of the supporting ecosystem. Read More...

Agriculture and Rural Development in Western Georgia: A Baseline Assessment

This report assesses a wide variety of topics related to agriculture and rural development in seven districts of western Georgia: Lanchkhuti, Ozurgeti, and Chockhatauri in Guria, Khobi, Senaki, and Abasha in Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti and Tsageri in Racha-Lechkhumi and Kvemo Svaneti.
Households across these seven districts were surveyed as part of the field research for the Cooperation for Rural Prosperity in Georgia project, which is being implemented in the framework of the European Neighborhood Program for Agriculture and Rural Development (ENPARD Georgia). Read More...

EUROPEAN NEIGHBOURHOOD PROGRAMME FOR AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT – GEORGIA (ENPARD III) – SUPPORT TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIVELIHOODS IN DISADVANTAGED RURAL REGIONS OF GEORGIA (APRIL 2019)

Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) started the “Implementing LEADER in Mestia municipality for better livelihoods in high mountainous regions of Georgia” in 2019. The project aims to improve the livelihoods of vulnerable households in Mestia Municipality, a remote high mountainous region of Georgia. The project aims to support both economic and social well-being. To do so, the project will attempt to improve the diversification and competitiveness of the rural economy, the inclusion of vulnerable groups, and the sustainable management of natural resources in Mestia Municipality. The LEADER approach, which the project takes, uses a bottom-up approach to rural development. The project will be implemented over the course of four years, concluding in February 2022.
In support of this goal, CARE commissioned the Caucasus Research Resource Centers Georgia (CRRC Georgia) to carry outa gendered political economy analysis as a baseline report. The results of the baseline data collection activities are presented in this report. The research project aims to look into three broad areas within Mestia Municipality including inclusive governance, service delivery, and markets.To provide data on these subjects, the project used a mixed methods approach, including: desk research, focus groups, key informant interviews, and a survey. Read More...

The Georgian Tea Sector: A Value Chain Study

The European Union is supporting rural development in Georgia through its European Neighbourhood Programme for Agriculture and Rural Development (ENPARD). Implemented since 2013, with a total budget of EUR 102 million in 2013-2019, the main goal of ENPARD is to reduce rural poverty in Georgia. The first phase of ENPARD in Georgia focused on developing the potential of agriculture. The second phase focuses on creating economic opportunities for rural population that go beyond agricultural activities. More information on ENPARD is available at: www.enpard.ge

The main goal of this study is to identify approaches through which the competitiveness of the Georgian tea sector can be improved. We analyze and describe the complete tea sector value chain in Georgia. To this end, we propose different policy approaches aimed at improving overall productivity in the sector. Read More...

Projet d’appui à la filière halieutique (PAFHa) au Mali

Projet d’appui à la filière halieutique (PAFHa) in Mali is a project that aims to reduce food and nutrition insecurity in Mali by improving incomes through the development of the fishing industry.
PAFHa's goals include:
-Improved Conservation, enhancement and marketing of fish products
-Developed fish production (fishing/fish farming) through sustainable practices
- Strengthened government technical services and professional organisations are involved in the program and their capacities Read More...

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
Read More...

Desk review to conduct assessment of ‘value for money’ provided through CARE International’s programmes to vulnerable and marginalised populations in Asia

This case study has been prepared as part of a study commissioned by CARE International (CI) to assess its long-term impact achieved in the Asia Pacific region between 2005 and 2010. As part of this process CI explored the extent to which socio-economic cost benefit analysis could be applied on a sample of CI projects, using an adapted form of the Social Return on Investment (SROI) methodology1.
The aim of the study was to gain a better understanding of CI’s ability to deliver added benefit and value to participating communities and their societies, given invested resources, whilst testing the feasibility of applying an adapted form of SROI to projects. The study is also expected to contribute to a wider discussion on the usefulness, and applicability, of demonstrating value for money within the contexts CI works.
Given CI’s focus on empowerment, and especially of marginalised and vulnerable women, this case study presents the analysis and findings of four projects: Plantation Community Empowerment Project (PCEP), Sri Lanka Social & Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU), Bangladesh Integrated Rural Development and Disaster Mitigation (IRDM), Cambodia Poverty Alleviation in Remote Upland Areas (PARUA), Laos
It is important to note that the projects selected for analysis were initiatives within wider programmes and, as such, were not intended to be illustrative of the overall programme’s magnitude or effectiveness. The SROI methodology is a good fit for CI’s projects due to its participatory nature and valuation of things that matter to stakeholders. However, due to the desk-based nature of this study, these findings should be seen as purely indicative as field research would be required to build a definitive and an accurate picture of impact. Read More...

Pathways Project End of Project Evaluation Report

Pathways aimed to increase productivity and income in equitable agriculture systems. CARE innovated an effective Theory of Change to address real issues affecting rural women farmers by providing them with capacities in agriculture; access to inputs, extension services and markets; empowerment to influence decisions; and an enabling environment for growth.

Pathways has met and, in most cases, surpassed targets set in its M&E framework. In the words of women themselves the project has worked very well, focusing on groundnuts and soybean as high-value cash crop substitutes for tobacco because of their high potential for markets, ability to replenish the lost soil fertility and strong nutritional value. It has grown from working with 9,000 to 14,282 farmers (hosting a population of 71,410 people), organising them into 1,528 groups. Women provide leadership to most of the groups after being transformed to become successful wives, farmers and entrepreneurs who can make independent decisions and speak in public.

In 2015 alone, collective sale revenues from groundnuts and soy amounted to MK128, 601,938 (US$233,821.7) and rose to MK854, 356,267 (US$751,511) by the end of 2017. Contract farming organized by the project contributed US$34,233 to these revenues. In 2014, the project conducted 188 community-wide gender dialogue sessions and reached out to 9,654 people, 7193 female and 2464 male, helping them to internalize and address gender inequalities. Men have generally started looking at women as partners in agriculture and development that is cementing marriage bonds and creating an enabling environment for women to succeed. Along with this, CARE Malawi linked women farmers to key players in the groundnut and soy value chains to help them excel.

As a consequence, by December 2016 a total of 246 farmer groups had accounts with OIBM and other banks through which they saved MK49, 175,577 and 6 VSLs accessed two group loans worth MK4,800,000 (US$7,804.88) which they invested in agriculture, business and VSL activities. VSLs profited and shared out US$871,178 in the year, with more benefits seen in 2017 when savings accumulated to US$3,756,435 e.g. earnings of MK47, 489.32 to MK204, 769.33 per household on average. In turn, per capita household monthly incomes and expenditures doubled by the time the project closed in December 2018. Although agricultural productivity continued to decline over the project life due to poor weather conditions, Pathways farmers remained food secure and continued to eat at least two meals a day. Household dietary diversity (HDDS) and women intra-household food access (AHA) data from this evaluation found levels of consumption to be acceptable and typical of food secure households. These results showcase that Pathways beneficiaries have grown their incomes, assets and food availability in the face of the changing climate and are better off even in difficult years. Read More...

Evaluation Initiale du projet de renforcement de la résilience des communautés les plus vulnérables par l’intermédiaire d’actions de réduction de risques de catastrophes inclusives à Madagascar

Du fait de sa situation géographique dans le sud-ouest de l'océan Indien, Madagascar est le deuxième pays d'Afrique le plus exposé à de multiples risques de catastrophe. Entre 2000 et 2017, Madagascar a enregistré 19 catastrophes majeures déclenchées par l'environnement nécessitant une assistance internationale, ce qui le place bien devant tout autre pays en Afrique australe au cours de la même période. Parmi les divers aléas auxquels le pays est exposé, les tempêtes tropicales et les inondations sont ceux qui causent le plus de dommages socio-économiques et de pertes de vies humaines.
Les districts de Mahajanga I, Mahajanga II et Marovoay qui sont localisés sur la côte Ouest Malgache font partie des districts à risques en cas de catastrophes naturelles en particulier les cyclones et les inondations. Compte tenu de l’historique et de la probabilité que d’autres catastrophes naturelles se produisent au niveau de la zone dans le futur, CARE avec le financement d’ECHO met en oeuvre un projet d’amélioration de la résilience des populations et des institutions pour faire face aux risques de catastrophes d’une durée de 21 mois dans la Région Boeny sur la côte ouest de Madagascar.
A cet effet, CARE a procédé à un appel à consultance pour la réalisation d’une évaluation de référence incluant une enquête sur les connaissances, attitudes et pratiques des communautés cibles du projet qui utilisera des méthodes qualitatives et quantitatives et dont le but est de collecter des données de référence qui aideront éventuellement les parties prenantes du projet à tirer des conclusions rigoureuses sur la performance du projet (pertinence, efficience, efficacité, impact, durabilité) à la fin du projet. Read More...

REPORT ON BASELINE ASSESSMENT OF THE FAGNOITSE PROJECT District of Ambovombe

As a result of the combined effects of the El Niño phenomenon and prolonged drought in southern Madagascar, this part of the island faces severe food insecurity and economic vulnerability hampering its capacity to cope with shocks. According to the recent update of FEWS NET1 (April 2018), Madagascar is considered as in crisis for the period running from October 2017 to June 2018 because of poor rainfall forecasts, resulting in below-average harvests and limited food access. The latest monitoring report of the food security cluster2 (April 2018) shows that 820,299 people are in need of food assistance, including 586,076 people considered as in “crisis” and 234,223 who have reached the “emergency level” as regards exposure to food insecurity in southern Madagascar. Irregular, uneven and insufficient rain during the farming season (December 2017 to March 2018) raised concerns about the population's ability to store food and survive until next harvest. Despite food distributions (mainly school meals provided by WFP) and food production interventions (conducted by FAO and other agencies), drought has put extreme pressure on local communities and has led to an increase in the number of people suffering from food insecurity.
The disruption of work and income opportunities and livelihoods has also caused serious gaps in income generation, loss of productive assets and adoption of harmful coping mechanisms. The recent WFP/FAO Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM, December 2017) showed that loss of productive assets, such as the sale of production means, equipment and tools, has prevented people from producing food and generating income. In the absence of targeted assistance due lack of funding, people with moderate malnutrition may face severe malnutrition during the dry season. Vulnerable groups need immediate assistance in addition to an intervention aiming at increasing their resilience to shocks over the long term.

CARE is proposing, through the OFDA South project, a specific humanitarian intervention in the Ambovombe district for a period of 12 months in 6 communes in the Ambovombe district, including: Imanombo, Ambanisarika, Tsimananada, Marovato-Befeno, Ampamata, and Jafaro to save lives among the most vulnerable groups, prevent an aggravation of food insecurity and promote resilience building measures in parallel to the humanitarian response. The overall outcome of the project is to alleviate the drought-affected populations’ suffering in southern Madagascar through food production restoration, improved livelihoods and improved access to water. Read More...

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