Agriculture|Natural Resources|Environment

Summative Evaluation for Food Sufficiency for Farmers

The evaluation primarily focused on assessing the overall performance of the project, ultimate and intermediate outcomes and the way in which they individually and collectively contribute to ultimate outcomes of the project in particular and overall goal of PSNP in general. In addition, this evaluation seeks to capture the project lessons learned at different levels including drawing out the rationale of why and how the project results were achieved. The evaluation covers, West Hararghe, East Hararghe, and South Gondar zones that are intervention areas of the project results from 2013-14 and 2017-18.

Supported and funded by the GAC, the five-year FSF project has been implemented by CARE Canada and CARE Ethiopia in close partnership with relevant government intuitions and private sector partners from 2013-14 and 2017-18. With a budget of CAD$13,052,440, of which CAD$ 12,000,000 was contributed by GAC and CAD$ 1,052,440 by CARE, the project was implemented in a total of 11 woredas within Oromia and Amhara Regions. In the Oromia Region, the project was active in two zones, West Hararghe (in Odabultum, Doba, Messela and Tullo woredas) and in East Hararghe (Kurfa-Chelle, Haromaya, Meta and Deder woredas). In the Amhara region, South Gondar Zone, the project was implemented in Simada, Ebinat and Tach-Gayant woredas. The overall objective of the project is to increase the beneficiary household’s income to equal CAD$ 400 over the life of the project and to ensure beneficiaries are food secure. The project’s total primary beneficiaries’ number is 42,887 PSNP households and out of these, 34,310, including 5,000 Female Headed Households (FHH), are expected to achieve sustained graduation from food aid. [222 pages] Read More...

Bringing Agroforestry to Scale for Improved Livelihoods

The BrASIL-CSVIL project is a collaborative project between the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and CARE Mali (HARANDE Program) for maximizing synergies. The Goal of the Harande program, meaning ‘food security’ in Fulani, consists of “Sustainable food, nutrition and income security for vulnerable household members in Youwarou, Tenenkou, Bandiagara and Douentza in Mopti region. The collaboration under BrASIL-CSVIL aims at ensuring a better intervention that takes full account of adaptation to climate change, optimal natural resource management and reduction of target communities’ vulnerability to climate change. This partnership puts high emphasis on the bottom up and community led, cascading training of trainers and farmer-to-farmers learning approaches. A key strength of the Harande program is its links with other development actors that maximize synergy and multiply impacts for population groups beyond the targeted communities as well as leveraging efforts funded by USAID by establishing linkages with Feed the Future projects. In order to be more inclusive and innovative in its approach, Harande proposed to work closely with all the USAID projects operating in the Mopti region but also other development actors. Initially, the project was planned to be implemented in 10 villages in Mopti region. However, in 2018, the security issues have been degraded within the region especially in the district of Douenza. Therefore, our activities were focused within 2 villages, Dandoli (new) and Sincarma (old) in the district of Bandiagara. Some activities were done in three other new villages including Koé Doe (Commune of Pignari), Wendéguélé (Commune of Dandoli) and Ourou (Commune of Dourou), all in the Cercle of Bandiagara of Mopti region.
The present report gives an overview of activities conducted in the Fiscal Year of 2018 from October 1, 2017 to September 30, 2018 under the BrASIL-CSVIL project. [17 pages]
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Evaluation finale du Projet FARIMBOGNA

Une situation géographique « inadéquate » au sein du bassin cyclonique Sud-Ouest Océan Indien place le pays sur une sorte de « route des cyclones ». Près du tiers des cyclones prennent naissance au niveau de l’Océan Indien et évoluent grosso modo sur une trajectoire Est Ouest, avec de multiples variantes (en Termes de sinuosité des trajectoires). Cet ensemble fait de la Région Atsinanana, une porte d’entrée privilégiée des cyclones issus de l’Est. Et les prévisions assez pessimistes des perturbations climatiques ne semblent pas arranger la situation dans l’avenir. Une violence plus accrue des cyclones et des inondations est à craindre pour les décennies à venir. C’est pour cette raison que trois districts de la Région Atsinanana ont été choisis comme terrain de mise en œuvre du projet Farimbogna, avec un objectif de renforcement de la résilience des communautés les plus vulnérables par l’intermédiaire d’actions de réduction de risques de catastrophes inclusives. La mise en œuvre des activités a pu se faire grâce au soutien de l’Union Européenne. Read More...

Where the Rain Falls (WtRF) Phase-III Final Evaluation Report

The Project “Where the Rain Falls” (WtRF)-Phase-III started in January 2017 and ended in February 2019. It aimed at improving the resilience of targeted vulnerable and marginalized communities to the impacts of increasing variability of rainfall patterns by promoting CARE’s SuPER (Sustainable, Profitable, Equitable and Resilient) agriculture approach through community-based adaptation. This Final Evaluation Report is based on the study conducted during the period of November through December 2018. [60 pages] Read More...

Report on Contract Farming

This 24 page report discusses how land ownership traditionally remains the main source of wealth, social status, and economic and political power in Nepal. Apart from its productive value linked to livelihoods and food security, land ownership for the marginalized communities often becomes the determining factor between a life with dignity and security, and exposure to different vulnerabilities and uncertainties. Ironically, however, the richest 5% own 37% of the total cultivable land leaving only 15% to be shared among rest of the 47% households. Landlessness is as high as 32.1 %. Over 44% Dalits in the Terai and 22% of those in hills are landless and, thereby, deprived of their socio- economic rights.While landlessness is very high in the country, over 30 % of cultivable land is estimated to have been left fallow for various reasons such as increasing out-migration of youth, rapid urbanization, decreasing competitiveness for agricultural produce and use of farm land for alternative purposes. Land owners most often keep their land fallow fearing that giving them out for tenant farming would ultimately rob them of their land ownership. Read More...

Northern Uplands – Promoting Climate Resilience (NU PCR) Final Evaluation

NU-PCR is a climate change adaptation project implemented in three districts -- Mai, Samphan, and Ngot Ou -- in Phongsaly, Laos. It has a budget of 2,152,800 €. The project is being implemented by CARE International in Lao PDR as the lead agency together with the partner organisations CCL and SAEDA. NU-PCR worked in 30 villages with 1,778 households and 9,562 direct beneficiaries. The project is designed to improve the resilience of local ethic communities in Phongsaly Province to the impacts of climate Read More...

Northern Uplands Promoting Climate Resilience (NU PCR) Narrative Report

NU-PCR is a climate change adaptation project implemented in three districts -- Mai, Samphan, and Ngot Ou -- in Phongsaly, Laos. It has a budget of 2,152,800 €. The project is being implemented by CARE International in Lao PDR as the lead agency together with the partner organisations CCL and SAEDA. NU-PCR worked in 30 villages with 1,778 households and 9,562 direct beneficiaries. The project is designed to improve the resilience of local ethic communities in Phongsaly Province to the impacts of climate change and to strengthen the capacity of government authorities and villagers. [55 pages] Read More...

PRIME: Endline Survey Report

PRIME, a five-year project, was launched in 2012 to help vulnerable pastoralist communities become more resilient to shocks of this nature. Led by Mercy Corps, PRIME is a consortium of 10 organizations whose main objective is to reduce poverty and hunger in the drought-prone Afar, Oromiya and Somali regions. To accomplish these objectives, PRIME implements market- driven approaches to livestock production and livelihood diversification that simultaneously support dryland communities to adapt to a changing climate. As part of its project activities, PRIME developed a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan to assess the project's overall impact and the performance of related indicators (impact, outcome and output), and custom indicators on animal health services and the dietary diversity of infants and pregnant and lactating women. [64 pages] Read More...

Food security, nutrition, climate change resilience and gender: Policies for Small-Scale Farmers

This Policy Analysis is part of series of country-specific studies on Food and Nutrition Security (FNS) and Climate Change Resilience (CCR) policies in the Southern African region that CARE International is currently conducting. CARE identifies advocacy as one of the priority approaches to influence broader change and scale up effective solutions. Multiplying the impact of innovative solutions that bring lasting changes, by documenting and replicating successful experiences, promoting pro-poor approaches and advocating and influencing policies are key aspects of CARE global 2020 Program Strategy. The focus of this analysis is the implementation status of FNS- CCR, with a strong emphasis on how these policies impact in the small scale and women farmers. The analysis covers both national specific policies and those policies and commitments that the Government of Tanzania has signed to as part of global collective efforts. The analysis aims to become a baseline to better understand the policy gaps and implementation challenges in in FNS and CCR towards women and smallholders in Tanzania. [112 pages] Read More...

CARE – FANRAPAN Post-Project Evaluation of Climate Resilient Agriculture Practices

CARE and FANRPAN share common approaches to sustainable economic and social development. We jointly recognize the challenges to inclusive agricultural development in Africa. We also recognize the importance of agriculture research, policy advocacy and capacity strengthening, all of which are needed to improve agricultural production and productivity. This study is an integral part of these shared objectives and is a collaborative effort of the CARE and FANRPAN teams in Mozambique.

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