Basic and Girls' Education

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
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Towards Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls (TESFA) Ex-Post Evaluation Report

TESFA project (Towards Improved Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls) was launched in 2010 which targeted ever-married adolescent girls’ economic status and reproductive health. The project envisioned to mitigate the effects of early marriage among ever-married adolescent girls in two woredas, Farta and Lay Gayint, of South Gondar zone in the Amhara regional state of Ethiopia. The project aimed to reach five thousand adolescent girls having marital history under the age of 19 in 25 kebeles in the two woredas, with the goal of achieving measurable positive change in their economic empowerment and sexual and reproductive health status. The project operated through four programmatic arms: Economic empowerment only (EE only), Sexual and reproductive health only (SRH-only), Economic empowerment with sexual and reproductive health (combined) and a delayed implementation arm (Delayed comparison).

This sustainability assessment (Ex-Post Evaluation) was conducted in the areas where TESFA project was implemented for three years to improve economic (EE-only), and sexual and reproductive health (SRH-only) outcomes for ever‐married adolescent girls (10 - 19 years old). The Ex-post evaluation is conducted four years after the completion of TESFA project to assess the sustainability and auto-replication of original girls groups formed by TESFA project. Qualitative approach with purposive sampling method was employed in this sustainability study. Ever married girls groups from the former TESFA project SRH and EE arms, SAA group members (Adult male and female community members) in the SRH Arm, and different level government officials such as Kebele Officials, Health Extension Workers (HEW) and experts from different government offices were participants in the study. Detail information about the group was pulled from archived documents at field office and mapping exercise was done by identifying the girl groups with the help of CARE field office and SAA members in each kebele prior to the focus groups and key-informant interviews. Read More...

Child, Early and Forced Marriage: CARE’s Global Experience

In two world regions—Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and the Asia Pacific—CARE has developed regional strategies on CEFM that galvanize influence with regional, national, and global bodies, support feminist movements, connect the local to the global, scale up and share strategies that work, and target popular media with positive images of equality.18 At the same time, CARE is working on the ground in high prevalence countries around the world. This document lays out CARE’s
approach and experience in CEFM prevention and mitigation across the globe. Read More...

Tipping Point Final Evaluation Phase One Nepal

Phase 1 of CARE’s Tipping Point project addressed child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in two districts of Nepal in partnership with Siddhartha Samudayik Samaj (SSS) and Dalit Social Development Centre (DSDC). In its first phase, the project promoted girls’ rights and choices regarding marriage in 16 communities using complementary approaches with collectives of girls, boys, and parents, who regularly participated in meetings, and advocacy events to raise public awareness and promote gender-equitable social norms. The project also engaged allies and potential champions for girls’ rights, including government and civil society, to help drive social change and direct more resources towards girls’ empowerment in project communities.
At the conclusion of Phase 1, an external evaluation team visited project sites in Kapilvastu and Rupandehi to conduct qualitative data collection with girls, boys, parents, and community members. The evaluation team’s findings indicate that Tipping Point’s iterative and adaptive strategies have contributed to several changes in the lives of girls, the actions of parents and community members to support girls, and social norms that promote gender equity. Read More...

Projet Haïti Gagne, Lire, Ecrire et Réussir

Le projet Haïti Gagne, financé par UNICEF, vise à améliorer les compétences en lecture et en écriture des élèves dans les 53 écoles partenaires dans les départements du Nord et du Sud’Est. A cet effet, plusieurs initiatives susceptibles de faciliter l’apprentissage des élèves en salle de classe ont été prises, telles que : Le support aux élèves au niveau des fournitures scolaires, L’implication des parents et de la communauté dans le suivi de l’apprentissage des enfants, la formation continue des enseignants sur la méthode « M’ap Li Net Ale », etc.

La comparaison des résultats de l’évaluation mi-parcours et ceux de l’étude de base montrent que les élèves, en particulier ceux de la 2e AF, cette année ont obtenu de meilleurs scores dans presque toutes les sous-taches. Indépendamment des caractéristiques sociodémographiques (niveau et département) des élèves, la proportion des élèves qui ont obtenu zéro, cette année a diminué dans presque toutes les sous-taches, par rapport à celle observée au cours de l’année académique antérieure. Read More...

Final Evaluation Partnership for Learning

The Partnership for Learning (P4L) project is funded by Educate a Child (EAC) P4L whose goal is to return 6 million out-of-school children to school all around the world. P4L has been implemented by CARE Haiti since November 2013 in partnership with several institutions that provided leverage funding such as the Haitian Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MENFP), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR), TOMS, LIV Livres Solidaires, LIDE, GAP Inc and other local and international institutions. P4L is implemented in the departments of Ouest, Grand’Anse, Centre and Artibonite.

At the end of the project, 53,059 girls and boys had been enrolled by the project in 465 partner schools. The enrollment rate of formerly out of school children age 5-17 supported by the project (parent survey data) is estimated as 95.4% in school year 2017-2018, compared to 92.0% among the children age 5-17 from randomly sampled households. There was a statistically significant difference (chi-squared = 14.399, df=3, p<0.01) in the enrolment rate per department, with the department of Centre having the lowest rate of children 5-17 years in school (93.0%) and Grand’Anse with the highest at 97.7%. Read More...

Phase Two Endline Report – Can Communities take charge? The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan

The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education in Afghanistan (ALSE) is a multiyear, randomized controlled trial that aims to deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school access and learning through CBE, and (2) to sustain the gains achieved through CBE into the future. ALSE’s Phase One explored the effects of CBE on education access, children’s learning achievement and villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions. Phase Two focused on testing a CBE sustainability model, where village-level community institutions take charge of the CBE management jointly with local government education offices. Key findings from the Phase Two study include:1. ALSE’s cost-comparison analysis of CBE administration shows that the cost of the sustainability model of CBE is 53.7% the cost of NGO management of CBE per village. 2. Community administration of CBE under the sustainability model is as effective as under continued NGO administration in terms of promoting access to education and children’s learning, significantly outperforming what one might expect, given the cost difference mentioned above. 3. Community management under the sustainability model provides access and learning opportunities for both boys and girls; the model performs slightly more effectively for girls than for boys in increasing access to education, although this difference is not statistically significant. 4. The confidence in village community institutions among heads of households and CBE teachers did not differ from their confidence in those institutions under NGO administration. However, under the sustainability model, community leaders’ confidence in local institutions was lower than their confidence in these institutions under NGO management. Moreover, CBE teachers’ confidence that CBE classes will continue under the sustainability model was weaker than that of their peers in communities under the NGO model. The absence of mechanisms, including funds to ensure long-term access to the CBE classes, likely influenced this decline in confidence. 5. The level of villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions under the sustainability model of CBE were not significantly different than the level found in areas under continued NGO administration. Read More...

COMMUNICATION FOR EDUCATION AND IMPROVED SCHOOL GOVERNANCE

The present report describes an internal assessment of the impact of the Communication for Education Project (C4E) implemented by CARE in Ratanak Kiri and Mondulkiri Provinces. Under the project, a communication for development campaign was designed by CARE, in collaboration with UNICEF, MoEYS/PED and local government counterparts, to promote better awareness and positive attitudinal changes toward values of education to increase community demand for good quality education among parents, caregivers and community members. The campaign also sought to strengthen perceptions of stakeholders’ role in supporting inclusive learning environments for all children at school. The communication channels used by the campaign included sound recordings (e.g., radio, public announcements, etc.), posters, social media, and other forms of communication. In technical terms, the project focuses on the role of what are known as District-based Training and Monitoring Teams (DTMT1) and School Support Committees (SSCs) and their mandate to promote strengthened demand for inclusive quality education among community members and other stakeholders. Members of the School Support Committees (SSCs) led the campaign to improve attitudes and behaviors as these relate to education. These champions facilitated a Human-Centered Design Approach to the development of the campaign and planned events in remote communities targeted by the project. Read More...

STAGES-II Baseline Report

As part of the Girls Education Challenge-Transition (GEC-T) program, Steps Towards Afghan Girls’ Educational Success-II (STAGES-II) is expanding its work from GEC-1 to implement community-based education (CBE) to marginalised girls in 16 provinces of Afghanistan. STAGES-II is building on past activities and learning to introduce a new focus on transition, particularly the transition of girls from primary to secondary school education. The project aims to contribute to the learning and transition outcomes of 22,731 girls enrolled in primary- and lower-secondary community-based education (CBE) and accelerated learning programs (ALP). These beneficiaries are marginalised girls who live in remote areas un-serviced by government school education, and STAGES is targeting three sub-categories of marginalisation: girls with disabilities, girls who don’t speak the language of instruction and girls from poor households. In addition, STAGES will reach 9815 boys through community-based education, 187,390 girls and 158,942 boys in government schools and 7868 teachers in community-based and government schools. A total of 83,421 community members, and 3636 women and 5001 men participating in school management councils (SMCs) will also benefit from the project. Read More...

ACCES

L’initiative ACCES, a été mise en oeuvre dans les départements du Borgou et l’Ouémé du 1er septembre 2011 au 31 décembre 2016. Au cours de cette période, quatre composantes ont été exécutées en collaboration avec les acteurs étatiques, les partenaires communaux et l’institution Eau et Assainissement par l’Afrique (EAA) à travers la conduite de différentes activités liées aux résultats du cadre logique de l’intervention. Read More...

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