Basic and Girls' Education

Phase Two Endline Report – Can Communities take charge? The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education: A Randomized Field Experiment in Afghanistan

The Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effects of Community-Based Education in Afghanistan (ALSE) is a multiyear, randomized controlled trial that aims to deepen our understanding of ways (1) to maximize primary school access and learning through CBE, and (2) to sustain the gains achieved through CBE into the future. ALSE’s Phase One explored the effects of CBE on education access, children’s learning achievement and villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions. Phase Two focused on testing a CBE sustainability model, where village-level community institutions take charge of the CBE management jointly with local government education offices. Key findings from the Phase Two study include:1. ALSE’s cost-comparison analysis of CBE administration shows that the cost of the sustainability model of CBE is 53.7% the cost of NGO management of CBE per village. 2. Community administration of CBE under the sustainability model is as effective as under continued NGO administration in terms of promoting access to education and children’s learning, significantly outperforming what one might expect, given the cost difference mentioned above. 3. Community management under the sustainability model provides access and learning opportunities for both boys and girls; the model performs slightly more effectively for girls than for boys in increasing access to education, although this difference is not statistically significant. 4. The confidence in village community institutions among heads of households and CBE teachers did not differ from their confidence in those institutions under NGO administration. However, under the sustainability model, community leaders’ confidence in local institutions was lower than their confidence in these institutions under NGO management. Moreover, CBE teachers’ confidence that CBE classes will continue under the sustainability model was weaker than that of their peers in communities under the NGO model. The absence of mechanisms, including funds to ensure long-term access to the CBE classes, likely influenced this decline in confidence. 5. The level of villagers’ trust in and the legitimacy of local and national government institutions under the sustainability model of CBE were not significantly different than the level found in areas under continued NGO administration. Read More...

COMMUNICATION FOR EDUCATION AND IMPROVED SCHOOL GOVERNANCE

The present report describes an internal assessment of the impact of the Communication for Education Project (C4E) implemented by CARE in Ratanak Kiri and Mondulkiri Provinces. Under the project, a communication for development campaign was designed by CARE, in collaboration with UNICEF, MoEYS/PED and local government counterparts, to promote better awareness and positive attitudinal changes toward values of education to increase community demand for good quality education among parents, caregivers and community members. The campaign also sought to strengthen perceptions of stakeholders’ role in supporting inclusive learning environments for all children at school. The communication channels used by the campaign included sound recordings (e.g., radio, public announcements, etc.), posters, social media, and other forms of communication. In technical terms, the project focuses on the role of what are known as District-based Training and Monitoring Teams (DTMT1) and School Support Committees (SSCs) and their mandate to promote strengthened demand for inclusive quality education among community members and other stakeholders. Members of the School Support Committees (SSCs) led the campaign to improve attitudes and behaviors as these relate to education. These champions facilitated a Human-Centered Design Approach to the development of the campaign and planned events in remote communities targeted by the project. Read More...

STAGES-II Baseline Report

As part of the Girls Education Challenge-Transition (GEC-T) program, Steps Towards Afghan Girls’ Educational Success-II (STAGES-II) is expanding its work from GEC-1 to implement community-based education (CBE) to marginalised girls in 16 provinces of Afghanistan. STAGES-II is building on past activities and learning to introduce a new focus on transition, particularly the transition of girls from primary to secondary school education. The project aims to contribute to the learning and transition outcomes of 22,731 girls enrolled in primary- and lower-secondary community-based education (CBE) and accelerated learning programs (ALP). These beneficiaries are marginalised girls who live in remote areas un-serviced by government school education, and STAGES is targeting three sub-categories of marginalisation: girls with disabilities, girls who don’t speak the language of instruction and girls from poor households. In addition, STAGES will reach 9815 boys through community-based education, 187,390 girls and 158,942 boys in government schools and 7868 teachers in community-based and government schools. A total of 83,421 community members, and 3636 women and 5001 men participating in school management councils (SMCs) will also benefit from the project. Read More...

ACCES

L’initiative ACCES, a été mise en oeuvre dans les départements du Borgou et l’Ouémé du 1er septembre 2011 au 31 décembre 2016. Au cours de cette période, quatre composantes ont été exécutées en collaboration avec les acteurs étatiques, les partenaires communaux et l’institution Eau et Assainissement par l’Afrique (EAA) à travers la conduite de différentes activités liées aux résultats du cadre logique de l’intervention. Read More...

ACCESS Evaluation 2017

The ACCES Initiative is a project cofinanced by the European Union, CARE France, the Mairie of Paris, and ten communes in the Ouémé and Borgou departments of Benin. The primary promotor and implementer of the project was CARE International Benin/Togo and the targeted communes were Kalalé, N’Dali, Nikki, Pèrèrè, Tchaourou, Adjarra, Adjohoun, Akpro-Missérété, Bonou, Dangbo. The project lasted five years,with the goal of significantly improving access to infrastructure and services related to water, sanitation, and hygiene for 80 villages, 32 schools, and 10 health centers in ten rural communities of Benin. This was done through the construction and/or rehabilitation of water pumps and the extension of gravity schemes, the installation of incinerators in health centers, and the installation of latrines, trashcans, and urinals in primary schools. Additionally, trainings in management of the new installations were given to local actors and committees to foster self-reliance and local management, and Community Led Total Sanitation was used by facilitators to build demand for sanitation and to decrease or eliminate the practice of open defecation. Read More...

Tipping Point Bangladesh Final Evaluation

Phase 1 of CARE’s Tipping Point project addressed child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in 90 communities of Sunamganj, Bangladesh, in partnership with Action for Social Development (ASD) and Jaintia Shinnomul Songstha (JASHIS). In this first phase, the project promoted girls’ rights and choices around marriage through focused engagement with collectives of girls, boys, and parents, who received skills trainings and conducted advocacy events to promote gender-equitable social norms. The project also engaged allies and potential champions for girls’ rights, including government and civil society, to help drive social change and direct more resources towards girls’ empowerment in project communities.
At the conclusion of Phase 1, an external evaluation team visited a sample of project sites to conduct data collection with girls, boys, parents, and community members. Based on the evaluators’ findings, Tipping Point’s iterative and adaptive strategies have proven to be effective in supporting social norms that promote gender equity. Read More...

Community Based Education Enrichment Program in Afghanistan

The Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) was part of a larger endeavor of the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effect in Community Based Education (ALSE) research project. A similar parallel community-based education (CBE) program was being implemented by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in the provinces of Herat, Ghor, Daykundi and Bamyan. The project goal was to enhance increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. The evaluation provides an opportunity to gain a wider understanding of the overall achievements of the project and how the key evaluation questions of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and impact have been answered.

Overall, the project objectives were achieved since there are substantial evidences of increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. This was largely attributed to the project being implemented in coordination with the local government to support the efforts of the Afghan MoE in expanding the access to education in remote areas. The project also enhanced increased number of both male and female teachers, a challenge the Afghan government had faced in the past decades. This was the result of the provision of safe, quality learning opportunities and in addition to the increased commitment of the Shuras in supporting increased access to education by afghan children, particularly girls. Moreover, the very first initiative of mapping the planning and implementation of District Mapping exercise was carried out by all nine District Education Department (DEDs) in coordination with CARE. Read More...

Sports for Change (S4C) Baseline

Sports for change (S4C) projects aims at leveraging sports activities (Karate and Soccer) to contribute to addressing female disempowerment, gender based violence that is common in schools. The project seeks to raise awareness in schools and communities around schools targeting both learners aged 12-17 and key gatekeepers that interface with the girl including teachers, parents and religious leaders. By the end of the project in 2021, the project hopes to have built a critical mass of youth’s advocates that will keep the momentum of advocating for girl on issues of GBV and gender equality. The project also hopes to cause a shift in society’s attitude towards girls’ empowerment and sexual gender based violence. The project commenced in 2018 is expected to wrap up in 2021. [51 pages] Read More...

Horumarinta Elmiga II (Education for Empowerment through Cohesive and Harmonized System

Horumarinta Elmiga II (Education for Empowerment through Cohesive and Harmonized System) was a three-year (September 2015 – August 2018) education program funded by the European Union (EU), and implemented in all the six administrative regions by a consortium of Save the Children (lead agency), CARE International and Norwegian Refugees Council (NRC), in partnership with the MOEHS of Somaliland. The specific objective of the program was ‘education and training services, responsive to the priorities, needs and requirements of the population of Somaliland, efficiently and equitably delivered.’ [49 pages] Read More...

Waxbarashadu Waa Iftiin (Education is Light) Phase II Project: Endterm Evaluation

This is the report of the End Term Evaluation (ETE) of Waxbarashadu Waa Iftiin (Education is Light) Phase II Project, a 21⁄2 year European Union (EU) funded project implemented in Puntland State of Somalia from 2015/2016 to 2017/2018. The project was implemented by a consortium of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) comprising CARE (the Lead Agency), Save the Children, ADRA and VU Amsterdam University, in close collaboration with, coordination by, and guidance of the Ministry of Education. The ETE field work was done in July 2018. Data entry, processing, analyses and report were done in August, 2018.
The overall objective of the project was: “Education and training efficiently and effectively delivered’, contributing to poverty alleviation within a peaceful, secure and democratic Somalia”
Its specific objective was: “Education and training services, responsive to the priority requirements of the Somali population, efficiently and equitably delivered.” The project had three (3) expected results: Result 1: Increased access to equitable and quality education for learners; Result 2: Increased participation of youth and adults, including vulnerable groups, in technical and vocational education and training; and, Result 3: Capacity of education institutions, administrations and systems strengthened. Read More...

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