cash and vouchers

Final Evaluation of the Project Building resilience among refugees and their Jordanian hosts

From the period 1/09/2017- 31/08/2019, CARE International in Jordan implemented a project titled “Building resilience among refugees and their Jordanian hosts” and the project aimed at supporting vulnerable Syrian refugees and Jordanians to enhance resilience and protection, especially from gender-based violence (GBV), through improved access for men and women to dignified, sustainable livelihoods in the Syria crisis highly-impacted areas of Amman, Zarqa and the Azraq refugee camp, while promoting social cohesion between Syrians and vulnerable Jordanians through joint programming and the provision of dignified solutions for long-term urgent cash needs.

Findings
• An effective project design and proposal document which included all components of a proposal document and it is considered to be a strong basis for an effective implementation process.
• Availability of planning documents to include detailed work plans, log frames, need analysis.
• Availability of M&E system.
• Conformity with donor regulations and standards.
• The implemented project responded to a number of strategies to include the Jordan Response plan and CARE International annual plans and strategies.

Conclusions:
According to literature and desk review we conclude the following;
• Project’s provided documents in design and planning phases in addition to the implemented M&E process supported to accelerate the effectiveness of project operations and implementations and this is evident through the desk review and interviews with consortium partners who acknowledge this aspect.
• It is evident that the project was designed to respond to national strategies like the Jordan Response Plan 2018-2020.
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EMERGENCY FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM: FINAL EVALUATION REPORT

This report provides the results of the final evaluation of the Emergency Food Security Program (EFSP) implemented in twelve districts within the four regions of Sool, Sanaag, Galgaduud and Mudug that was conducted during July and August 2019.

Over and above the program performance parameters, the beneficiaries overwhelmingly indicated that the program had had significant positive impacts. The program was considered timely as it was delivered when beneficiaries were getting into months of food insecurity. When asked whether the cash transfer had improved their livelihoods, 93% of the household survey respondents reported that their livelihoods had improved, mainly in terms of improved purchasing power (93%), ease of meeting their basic needs (78%), better social status (22%), better and more recognition (17%), taking children to school (14%), access to healthcare (9%) and in other (non-described) areas (7%). In the household survey, 94% of the respondents received three cycles of the correct amount, whilst 5% who were targeted under the Rapid Response Fund (RRF) received two cycles enabling households to purchase their preferred foods, at least 25Kg of rice, 25Kg of sugar, 25kg wheat flour, 3kg of cooking oil, 10kg of pasta and some vegetables.

The program had a positive impact on the 52,299 households enrolled. The programme resulted in a reduction of distress coping strategies, with an average rCSI of 12.8 reducing from 20.4 at the program baseline. This supports the effectiveness of the program in enabling the beneficiaries to reduce the number of negative coping strategies that they were previously employing in order to meet basic household needs. In addition, as planned, all the households used the cash transfer to meet their basic needs, with 97% of them using the cash transfer to purchase food for the household, indicating that the cash intervention has directly contributed to the enhancement of the household food security during the drought. Trend analysis shows that throughout the program there was a downward trend of the rCSI scores, while there was an increase of household dietary diversity index to 20.4 compared to the baseline of 12.8. Similarly, an analysis of household hunger shows that in general the beneficiaries were experiencing little to no hunger, with only 13% experiencing moderate hunger and 86% of households experiencing little to no hunger. This again indicates that the programme has achieved positive outcomes.

While the evidence suggests that the program generated a number of positive impacts, across many domains, demonstrating effective and efficient implementation, and that the beneficiaries used the cash as per the original objectives of the program, households continue to faces challenges in their capacity to fully recover from the impacts of conflict and drought. Increasing the scale of interventions and developing additional holistic livelihood strategies for the target areas, creating linkages with market-based interventions and improvement in access to water, education and healthcare, experimenting with graduation models combined with local savings (VSLAs) were among some of the areas identified for improving future programming. A more detailed description of these recommendations is provided towards the tail end of the report. Read More...

Somalia Resilience Program Third Party Monitoring: Midline Assessment

The Somalia Resilience Program (SomReP) is a consortium of seven international non-governmental organisations (INGOs). The aim of the consortium is to enhance the resilience of vulnerable households and communities in Southern Somalia against cyclical shocks and stressors. The program’s activities focus on securing livelihoods and increasing adaptive capacities of communities and households in Somalia.

Overall, positive developments from the baseline was noted for most of the indicators analyzed in this report. Most of these positive developments could be attributed to different programme interventions. The attribution was tested through statistical correlation analysis and by synthesizing programme documents and the data collected at various stages throughout the project. The food security status of the respondents had improved, both in terms of food consumption and coping strategies. For example, the proportion of the respondents categorized as having an acceptable level of the Food Consumption Score (FCS) had increased from 48.5% in the baseline to 80.4% in the midline. The income of the respondents had also improved with both a significantly higher average income as well as more diversified income being reported. Those respondents that were part of a savings scheme as well as those that had received cash distributions through Cash for Work (CfW) or Unconditional Cash Transfers (UCT) reported higher FCS than those who had not. Respondents that had received cash distributions were also positively associated with higher incomes. As such, it is recommended that both VSLA and cash programming interventions should be sustained and if possible scaled-up. It is worth noting that livelihoods were still largely climate sensitive, with day labour in agriculture being the most common and important livelihood strategy, especially for male respondents. This implies that most people are still highly vulnerable to climatic shocks, such as drought. Read More...

Somalia Resilience Program Third Party Monitoring: Baseline Study

The Somalia Resilience Program (SomReP) is a consortium of seven Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO), the activities of which aim to enhance the resilience of vulnerable households and communities in Southern Somalia against cyclical shocks and stressors. This report serves as the baseline for the Third Party Monitoring (TPM) of SomReP in two districts in South and Central Somalia: Afgooye and Baidoa. The TPM study is undertaken by Forcier Consulting on behalf of SomReP, with the aim to rigorously monitor the progress and outcomes of the program.

The data indicates that resilience differed among livelihood groups (agro-pastoralist, pastoralists, and peri-urban), between women and men, and across seasons. This means that program approaches should take these differences into account when targeting groups for various interventions. For instance, people in peri-urban areas tended to have less diverse diets, while pastoralists tend to engage in more severe and frequent coping strategies. Out of the different livelihood types, pastoralists were also the most likely to report no access to risk transfer or sharing. Further, women tended to have less diverse incomes than men and incomes tend to be lowest in the dry season of Jilaal, the season in which most agriculture-related work was replaced with unskilled work. These findings indicate that women should be more frequently targeted for income diversity interventions, and pastoralists should be targeted with interventions that aim to increase social safety nets, such as risk sharing.

Capacities to deal with stressors in both the short and long-term were low across the targeted areas. Natural resource management (NRM) was poor in both districts and in and across communities. Sustainable access to natural resources is an important factor in ensuring long-term resilience and should therefore receive more attention across the communities. Response capacities were also absent across the communities. Only 9.7 of all respondents said their community had a community-based early warning system in place. Further, only 5.7% of the respondents said community initiatives existed that aimed to access support from sub-national and national institutions and authorities to respond to and cope with the recurrent shocks and stressors. Hence, moving forward, the program should ensure a focus of combined approaches to achieve improvements in system-wide resilience. Read More...

YOUTH EMPLOYABILITY IN THE INFORMAL SECTOR (YEIS) PROJECT: End of Project Evaluation Report

This report presents the findings of the End of Project (EOP) Evaluation of the YEIS Project. The purpose of the EOP Evaluation was to ascertain the extent to which the project achieved its objectives and results. The Evaluation focused on the following aspects: (i) relevance, (ii) effectiveness (iii) impact (iv) efficiency (v) innovation, (vi) scalability and reliability, (vii) sustainability, (viii) project lessons learned and best practices, (ix) sensitivity to gender, women’s rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities, (x) project’s implementation architecture.

The overall objective of the YEIS project was to contribute to the elimination of poverty of youth between (16-30 years) dependent on the informal sector in Rwanda with a specific geographical coverage of seven districts namely; Nyarugenge, Kicukiro in Kigali City, Rulindo, Gakenke in the Northern Province, Nyabihu, Rubavu and Ngororero in the Western Province. The project was implemented by AJPRODHO in partnership with YWCA and CARE with funding from the European Union and Austrian Development Agency for a period of four years running from February 2015 to January 2019. Read More...

Addressing Food Crisis in Yemen

In 2017, in response to the one of the world's worst manmade crises, a consortium of CARE and Action Contra La Faim (ACF) implemented a EU-Funded Multi-Purpose Cash program in Abyan and Amran governorates with a mean aim of enhancing food security (FS) as well as supporting livelihood activities, savings groups and the resilience of communities with the rehabilitation of critical community-identified shared assets. The program design was aligned to the Humanitarian Development Nexus framework, which focuses on a shift from supplying humanitarian assistance to those who need it, to reducing the demand for humanitarian assistance by addressing the root causes.

This report presents the evaluation findings from the project during over its full implementation period (October 2017- February 2019) in the targeted areas. It uses the DAC Evaluation Criteria: Relevance, Efficiency, Effectiveness, Impact and Sustainability. It also provides insight on the internal and external factors influencing the achievement (or non-achievement) of the project objectives. The analysis should inform decisions about replicating interventions, draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the implementation strategies, highlight lessons learned and lead to recommendations to inform future programming and policymaking. Read More...

ADDRESSING FOOD CRISIS IN YEMEN: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF EVALUATION

In 2017, in response to the one of the world’s worst manmade crises, a consortium of CARE and Action Contre la Faim (ACF) implemented a European Union (EU)-funded Multi-Purpose Cash (MPC) project in the Abyan and Amran governorates of Yemen. The project aimed to enhance food security and to support livelihood activities, savings groups, and the resilience of communities with the rehabilitation of critical, community-identified shared assets. The program design was aligned with the Humanitarian Development Nexus framework, which focuses on a shift from supplying humanitarian assistance to those who need it to reducing the demand for humanitarian assistance by addressing the root causes of these needs.

This brief gives an overview of the project evaluation. Read More...

Final Evaluation of Jordanian Community Development Support Program

This evaluation assessed the Jordanian Community Development and Support Program (JCDSP), which aimed to enhance the socio-economic well-being and quality of life for Jordanian host community members, especially for Jordanian women and young women and men (ultimate outcome). The Program was delivered by CARE Canada and CARE International in Jordan in two phases. Phase 1 spanned three years, from 2014 to 2017, and lent assistance to meet the most critical needs of vulnerable populations from communities in Irbid, Mafraq, Zarqa, and East Amman. Its objective was to augment and supplement overwhelmed government services brought on by the large scale migration of Syrian refugees within these four target communities. The Program’s second phase, lasting 18 months (April 2018 to September 2019), responded to the longer term challenges and opportunities as more and more of the Syrian refugees made the decision to permanently settle in these communities. Under this phase, the Program shifted focus from humanitarian assistance to women’s economic empowerment, social cohesion and safety net enhancements. Accordingly, under this second phase, only two out of the three intermediate outcomes were maintained. As part of the shut-down process of the Program, CARE Canada and CARE International commissioned this summative evaluation to look at the success and challenges derived from this process. Through the collection of primarily qualitative data and augmented with data collected by the Program, this evaluation: 1. Assessed the degree to which the program has achieved its outcome results (impact) and the relative relevance, efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of program activities to generate these outcome results as per the Program’s theory of change; and 2. Provide insight, analysis and recommendations to CARE Jordan, and the CARE federation regarding the strengths and challenges of the programming to inform and improve future programming. Read More...

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