Child Nutrition

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
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Improving Effective Coverage of Maternal, New-born and Child Health Interventions for Reducing Preventable Child Deaths in Tangail and Khulna

Bangladesh has achieved success in reducing U5 & maternal mortality in last decade. UNICEF is partnering with GoB to contribute to reduce maternal and newborn deaths. To this end, MoH&FW with partnering with UNICEF and technical support from KOIKA implemented a MNCH project (IECMNCH) in Tangail and Khulna in line with UNICEF’s efforts to pay attention to low performing upazilas and HTR areas, started in 2015. CARE is one of the partners on this project.
designed to address main causes of newborn deaths (birth asphyxia, infection, prematurity)
to increase availability, utilization of quality MNCH-&-Nutrition services by
- increasing, sustaining of effective coverage of selected interventions;
- strengthening health system with increased availability & access to quality MNCH services;
-positive behaviour & social norm change through community participation & ownership for effective demand creation for increased utilization of MNCH services.

A baseline study in 2015 and an endline evaluation study in 2018 were implemented by UNICEF. Here are the endline study findings with corresponding baseline findings where necessary.
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Improving Sexual, Reproductive Health and Rights Including Maternal and Newborn Health in Bangladesh

UNICEF in collaboration with Bangladesh government launched a project “Improving Sexual, Reproductive Health and Rights including Maternal and Newborn Health in Bangladesh” to improve integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights including maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health in 5 districts. CARE was a key implementing partner in this project.

Before implementation of the project a baseline study in 5 project districts (Patuakhali, Rangamati, Sirajganj, Jamalpur and Moulvibazar) with 4 comparison districts (Barguna, Khagrachhari, Lalmonirhat and Sylhet), implemented by UNICEF and conducted by SURCH between 9th May and 18th August 2018
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FANSER End of Project Evaluation: Knowledge, Attitudes & Practices Survey

This report presents the findings of an evaluation of the Food and Nutrition Security and Enhanced Resilience (FANSER) project implemented by CARE International in three wards in Katete District of the Eastern province of Zambia. The main objectives of the study were: to describe the nutrition situation among the FANSER target groups in Katete District i.e. assess the IDDS-W, IDDS-C; to assess the nutrition-related behaviours i.e. examine knowledge, attitudes, behaviours and practices related to agriculture, health, nutrition, hygiene and health practices of mothers (15-49 years old) and children (<2 years); and women empowerment; and to document evidence, lessons learned and good practices to inform future nutrition programming. The assessment utilized a mixed methods approach to collect data on project interventions in order to assess the impact of the project.
Using the global Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) platform, CARE International in Zambia with funding from GIZ under the “One World No Hunger” Initiative of the German Government, implemented various nutrition interventions to building capacity of staff and community volunteers to promote the production, preparation and consumption of diverse foods in Katete District particularly in Chimtende, Vulamkoko and Chimwa wards. This came from the realization that rural areas are more prone and vulnerable to malnutrition and deficiency diseases. The main goal of the project was to ensure that the food and nutrition security and dietary diversity of women of reproductive age and children under the age of two, in Katete district is improved. Read More...

PROGRAMME EUROPÉEN DE SÉCURITÉ ALIMENTAIRE ET NUTRITIONNELLE ASARA

L’Union Européenne finance les Programmes ASARA (Amélioration de la Sécurité Alimentaire et Augmentation des Revenus Agricoles) et AINA (Actions Intégrées en Nutrition et Alimentation) dans le cadre de son initiative visant à accélérer l’atteinte de l’Objectif du Millénaire pour le Développement (OMD) 1c, « réduire de moitié, d’ici 2015, la proportion de la population vivant dans l’extrême pauvreté et souffrant de la faim ».

ASARA et AINA pilotés respectivement par l'USCP (Unité de Suivi et de Coordination du Projet) et la FAO (Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’Alimentation et l’Agriculture) visent la réduction de l’insécurité alimentaire des familles vulnérables dans les zones ciblées. Le programme AINA vise en plus l’amélioration de la sécurité nutritionnelle de ces familles. Les Régions Androy, Anosy et Atsimo Atsinanana sont des zones communes aux deux programmes si AINA intervient également dans les Régions Amoron’i Mania, Vatovavy Fitovinany et ASARA dans le District de Fort-Dauphin. Read More...

Women’s Empowerment Program (WEP) Midterm Report

In 2009, Norad-funded women empowerment programs (WEPs) started implementation in seven countries: Burundi, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. In 2009 and early 2010, an extensive quantitative baseline study was conducted in these countries around a common set of indicators. The present mid-term review (MTR), which was done using qualitative methodology, analysed in depth the process and nature of changes that the programs are contributing towards. In all the program countries, the country WEP team carried out the review internally with the technical assistance of an external consultant and CARE Norway (CN).

With slight variations, the overall objectives of the country WEPs focused on the economic, social, and political empowerment of women. The village savings and loan association (VSLA) methodology was common for all the programs; and these groups create the platform for working on other aspects of the program besides economic empowerment. The initial changes that the programs produce are seen in terms of increased access to savings and loans, employment opportunities, and asset ownership. The ability of the women to earn income, generate their own savings and make financial contributions in the household (HH) has greatly improved their self-esteem, thereby giving them better leverage to involve in and influence HH decision making processes. Men were highly appreciative of the income women were able to bring in to the family as a result of being involved in VSLAs. Through their improved position in the household, women reported being able to negotiate the use of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and the abandonment of different harmful practices. Through the use of couples-based approach and engaging men initiatives, HH relationships are beginning to improve; men in these households are reportedly starting to have a more positive attitude towards women’s empowerment and are themselves even taking part in domestic activities in some contexts. The VSLA approach is enabling women to create strong social networks that are becoming an influential force for social change. As a result of increased knowledge on their human rights and increasing leadership skills, women are beginning to understand how they have to position themselves to realize their strategic interests. The VSLA groups and networks also enable women to mobilise support when they are running for elections; this support has increased number of women being elected into different posts. The contribution of women in VSLAs and in community leadership positions is being increasingly recognised and appreciated by local authority figures, which can be seen when they actively seek the advice of women and VSL groups in relation to different community development initiatives.
Through working in partnership with others, the programs are being implemented in a high quality and timely manner. Engagement with strategic partners has occurred effectively in some countries, and been instrumental in enabling the programs to link grassroots evidence to national level advocacy activities which have achieved concrete results. [52 pages] Read More...

Community-Driven Financial Inclusion for the Most Vulnerable Households

The Tat Lan Programme, funded by the Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) in Myanmar was implemented in two phases (2013-15 and 2017-18). The overall goal was to ensure a sustainable increase of food and nutrition security and incomes of participant households in 259 communities in the townships of Myebon, Pauktaw, Kyaukpyu and Minbya in Rakhine State. [24 pages] Read More...

Summative Evaluation for Food Sufficiency for Farmers

The evaluation primarily focused on assessing the overall performance of the project, ultimate and intermediate outcomes and the way in which they individually and collectively contribute to ultimate outcomes of the project in particular and overall goal of PSNP in general. In addition, this evaluation seeks to capture the project lessons learned at different levels including drawing out the rationale of why and how the project results were achieved. The evaluation covers, West Hararghe, East Hararghe, and South Gondar zones that are intervention areas of the project results from 2013-14 and 2017-18.

Supported and funded by the GAC, the five-year FSF project has been implemented by CARE Canada and CARE Ethiopia in close partnership with relevant government intuitions and private sector partners from 2013-14 and 2017-18. With a budget of CAD$13,052,440, of which CAD$ 12,000,000 was contributed by GAC and CAD$ 1,052,440 by CARE, the project was implemented in a total of 11 woredas within Oromia and Amhara Regions. In the Oromia Region, the project was active in two zones, West Hararghe (in Odabultum, Doba, Messela and Tullo woredas) and in East Hararghe (Kurfa-Chelle, Haromaya, Meta and Deder woredas). In the Amhara region, South Gondar Zone, the project was implemented in Simada, Ebinat and Tach-Gayant woredas. The overall objective of the project is to increase the beneficiary household’s income to equal CAD$ 400 over the life of the project and to ensure beneficiaries are food secure. The project’s total primary beneficiaries’ number is 42,887 PSNP households and out of these, 34,310, including 5,000 Female Headed Households (FHH), are expected to achieve sustained graduation from food aid. [222 pages] Read More...

PRIME: Endline Survey Report

PRIME, a five-year project, was launched in 2012 to help vulnerable pastoralist communities become more resilient to shocks of this nature. Led by Mercy Corps, PRIME is a consortium of 10 organizations whose main objective is to reduce poverty and hunger in the drought-prone Afar, Oromiya and Somali regions. To accomplish these objectives, PRIME implements market- driven approaches to livestock production and livelihood diversification that simultaneously support dryland communities to adapt to a changing climate. As part of its project activities, PRIME developed a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan to assess the project's overall impact and the performance of related indicators (impact, outcome and output), and custom indicators on animal health services and the dietary diversity of infants and pregnant and lactating women. [64 pages] Read More...

SDVC II Social Impact Studies

The study has explored dietary diversity, milk consumption, and perception of nutrition, hand washing and hygiene practices of SDVC project participants of four upazila namely Kaunia, Badargonj, Shajadpur and Gabtoli of three districts of Northern part of Bangladesh. For this topic a total 6 FGDs and 12 key informant interviews have conducted with 84 women group members of SDVC project. The group members and DFT center have selected based on length of membership and duration of installment of DFT. (15 pages) Read More...

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