Inclusive Governance

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

RAPPORT DEFINITIF BASELINE PROSPER II Thriving Cocoa Community Cargill

Cette étude dont l’objectif était de déterminer la situation actuelle des ménages producteurs de cacao dans les treize (13) nouvelles communautés sélectionnées du Projet PROSPER II sur les quatre (04) axes d’intervention du projet : (i) la gouvernance communautaire ; (ii) l’inclusion financière et des compétences entrepreneuriales des femmes ; (iii) la diversification des sources de revenus des ménages agricoles incluant la nutriton ; (iv) les solutions alternatives communautaires au travail des enfants ; afin que puissent être mesurés les changements qui interviendront après les trois (03) prochaines années de mise en œuvre, en utilisant la même approche, a démontré que la situation actuelle desdits ménages n’est guère réluisante. C’est ce que l’analyse des résultats combinés aux sources sécondaires et primaires notamment la collecte de terrain et les discussions de groupe nous permet d’indiquer. [97 pages]. Read More...

CARE Mali Harande FY20 Participants Based Survey PaBS Annual Report

Harande program, implemented the annual monitoring survey through the M&E Unit and Program team supported by the CARE USA Regional M&E Advisor. The methodology is based on the Participants Based Survey (PaBS survey) guidelines expressed in Feed the Future PABS guideline1. It has been conducted using the latest BHA participants-based survey methodology guidance. All fourteen (14) annual survey indicators have been computed using weighting procedures. Except for, gross margin, value of incremental and yield indicators that used more complex formulas, standard errors and confidence intervals have been established for the remaining indicators. FY20 Data collection has been made during the period of July 15 - 29, 2020 and methodology comply with the PaBS FtF guideline as recommended by BHA. The PaBS have been implemented in the following four (4) communes: Dourou, Dandoli, Douentza and Koubewel Koundia, and a total of 48 villages have been reached through these communes for data collection.

A total of 1,733 participants have been sampled for this PaBS. Within them 11% refused the survey and 72% were female. That bring the total participant who responded to the survey in all the frames without double counting to 1,529. Participants who overlap between frames during the survey were counted once. It appears that 28% of participants were youth. Out of a total of 1,529 interviewed respondents 1,265 come from households and 18% of them were household heads. The average size of households was 9 members (the number varies from a minimum of 2 to a maximum of 35 household members). [59 pages]. Read More...

Ghana Strengthening Social Accountability Mechanism (GSAM) final

USAID/Ghana contracted Social Impact, Inc. to conduct an impact evaluation of USAID’s Ghana Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) program, which aims to increase accountability of local District Assemblies in Ghana. This randomized-controlled trial, impact evaluation tests the effect of two distinct efforts to increase accountability and improve service delivery outcomes at the district level. One-hundred and fifty of Ghana’s districts were matched and randomized into one of three groups: a top-down treatment group that received performance audits conducted by the central government Ghana Audit Service (GAS); a bottom-up treatment group that received civil-society organization (CSO) led scorecard campaigns; and a control group that did not receive either intervention.
Through surveys with citizens, local administrators, and local politicians and through a review of administrative data, we find that both CSO and GAS programming generally reduce citizen satisfaction with projects and services, but this is largely driven by districts that receive negative audit reports. That citizens are correctly attributing bad audit performance to poor-performing DAs is encouraging from the point of view of accountability. This progress with citizens has not, however, translated into many substantial changes in how administrators or politicians manage projects or project budgets. Neither GAS nor CSO programming improve transparency or corruption. GAS programming does reduce the incidence of partisan manipulation of public resources by politicians, and it also increases the perception of partisan manipulation among administrators. This is consistent with GAS sensitizing administrators to partisan manipulation and reducing its actual incidence among DA politicians.
CSO programming increases citizen-reported consultation on recent development, and administrators in CSO districts spend, on average, three hours more responding to constituents. Reasons that the intervention did not have a stronger impact on district officials includes (1) natural limits to the number of citizens reached by the intervention, (2) limited district government capacity and frequent turnover, and (3) local government dependence on federal budget transfers. Read More...

Empowering Sri Lanka’s Tea Plantation Communities Final Evaluation

In May 2017 Chrysalis in partnership with CARE International UK began implementing the Empowering Sri Lanka’s Tea Plantation Communities Project funded by Twinning’s adopting Community Development Forums (CDFs) pioneered by CARE International Sri Lanka. These platforms seek to enhance worker-management relationships so to achieve social and commercial benefits in 7 tea estates in Sri Lanka by May 2019. Since inception the project has reached over 3,500 tea estate workers living in estates operated by three plantation companies with the help of the CDFs, while indirectly providing benefits to over 16,000 worker family members. At its core CDFs seek to transform relationships between management and estate workers, while also providing the estate community with a platform through which to directly influence and shape their development priorities and solutions. Further it serves to help link the community with a host of service providers and socioeconomic opportunities. Undertaken in July and August 2019 the overall objective of the end of project evaluation was to assess the degree to which the project had achieved its intermediate and the final goal and to develop key lessons so to enhance future programming in the sector. The evaluation used a contribution analysis, and a mixed method approach to collect data (e.g. household surveys, focus group discussions, key informant and structured interviews). Data was collected from 7 participating estates operated by 3 companies: Bogawanthalawa Plantations (Bogawana Estate, Kotiyagala Estate, Lethenty Estate and Fetteresso Estate), Malwatte Valley Plantations (Uva Highlands) and Agarapathana (Nayabedde Estate and Dambetenna Estate). Using the proportionate random sampling technique 241 respondents were selected for household surveys, 12 managers were interviewed using structured interviews and 7 focus group discussions were held consisting of 86 representatives from the 7 CDFs. A total of 16 key informants were also consulted [73 pages]. Read More...

SEMI-DURABLE SHELTER CONSTRUCTION AND THE TRIPLE NEXUS A study of the multisector ECHO-funded PAMUNOR project in southern Chad

LA CONSTRUCTION D’ABRIS SEMI-DURABLES ET LE TRIPLE NEXUS Une étude portant sur le projet d’assistance multi-sectorielle d’urgence financé par ECHO pour les réfugiés centrafricains et les communautés hôtes (PAMUNOR) au sud du Tchad

En novembre 2019, deux membres de l’équipe mondiale chargée des abris d’urgence de CARE International Royaume Uni a effectué une visite de deux semaines dans le sud du Tchad afin d’évaluer la composante Abris dans le cadre du projet PAMUNOR (Projet d’Assistance Multisectorielle d’Urgence pour les Nouveaux Réfugiés Centrafricains et des Communautés Hôtes) qui est financé par ECHO et géré par CARE Tchad. Ce projet cherche à promouvoir un environnement sûr et sécurisé, notamment en fournissant des abris semi-durables, et à favoriser les moyens de subsistance pour améliorer la sécurité alimentaire et atténuer les stratégies d’adaptation négatives adoptées par les réfugiés centrafricains (RCA) nouvellement arrivés, ainsi que par les membres vulnérables au sein de la communauté hôte. L’un des objectifs spécifiques visant à promouvoir un « environnement sécurisé » consistait à réduire les risques de violence basée sur le genre (VBG) et à assurer une médiation intra et intercommunautaire afin de garantir la coexistence pacifique – condition préalable indispensable à la protection et à la mise en œuvre de l’autosuffisance. L’évaluation s’est intéressée aux détails techniques et opérationnels de la composante Abris et a cherché à comprendre comment cette dernière s’intégrait à une approche programmatique plus large dans le contexte local. Elle a également examiné ses liens avec les différents mécanismes communautaires bénéficiant du soutien du projet. Le succès de la mise en œuvre s’explique par cette approche intégrée qui répond à la fois aux besoins urgents et fondamentaux en termes d’abris et de réduction des risques liés à la VBG, jette les bases pour la sûreté et la sécurité, et génère un environnement propice au développement des moyens de subsistance et favorable à la naissance d’aspirations et d’ambitions en termes d’éducation, de formation et d’apprentissage. Il est important de mentionner l’éventail de mécanismes qui a été mis en place par la communauté pour atténuer les conflits communautaires et la violence basée sur le genre, fruit d’un processus inclusif qui favorise la viabilité et l’appropriation. Les processus de renforcement de la coexistence pacifique, de la cohésion sociale et visant à favoriser l’intégration locale font partie intégrante de l’approche suivie par le projet, l’objectif recherché étant l’autosuffisance, et ils incarnent incontestablement le « troisième côté du triangle » au cœur du nexus Humanitaire-Développement-Paix. De ce point de vue, le projet permettrait de tirer de précieux enseignements programmatiques qui pourraient s’avérer pertinents dans d’autres contextes, au Tchad ou dans d’autres pays, connaissant des déplacements prolongés, un conflit communautaire de faible intensité, des besoins humanitaires et des opportunités de renforcement de la résilience, de l’autosuffisance et de la viabilité.

Two members of CARE International UK’s global Emergency Shelter Team conducted a two-week visit to southern Chad in November 2019 to evaluate the shelter component of CARE Chad’s ECHO-funded PAMUNOR project (Projet d’Assistance Multisectorielle d’Urgence pour les Nouveaux Réfugiés Centrafricains et des Communautés Hôtes / Project to provide multisectoral emergency assistance to newly displaced Central African Republic refugees and host communities). This project seeks to support safe and secure living environments, including through the provision of semi-durable shelters, and to stimulate livelihoods, improving food security and reducing negative coping mechanisms amongst newly arrived refugees from Central African Republic (CAR) as well as vulnerable members of the host community. A specific focus on supporting a “secure environment” was through reducing the risks of genderbased violence (GBV) and mediating within and between communities to ensure peaceful coexistence as a necessary pre-requisite for protection and the establishment of self-sufficiency. The evaluation was achieved by looking closely at the shelter component in technical and operational detail as well as by probing its connection to a broader programmatic approach within the local context and its links to various community mechanisms supported through the project. Effective implementation has been achieved through this integrated approach that simultaneously addresses urgent and fundamental needs for shelter and GBV-risk reduction while laying the foundations for safety and security and creating an enabling environment for the development of livelihoods and the growth of aspirations and ambitions for education, training and learning. Of particular note is the range of mechanisms to reduce community conflict and gender-based violence established through a highly effective community-led and inclusive process that brings sustainability and ownership. Processes of strengthening peaceful co-existence, social cohesion and stimulating local integration run through the project’s approach, seeking to catalyse self-sufficiency, and arguably represents the “third side of the triangle” within the humanitarian-development-peace nexus. In this regard, the project could provide valuable programmatic lessons to other contexts in Chad or elsewhere where protracted displacement, low-level community conflict, humanitarian needs and some opportunities for strengthening resilience, self-sufficiency and sustainability are present. [94 pages] Read More...

CARE Every Voice Counts Afghanistan Endline Evaluation

In Afghanistan, the Every Voice Counts program (EVC) is focused on women and girls as primary target groups in four Provinces - Balkh, Parwan, Kabul and Khost. The program worked at community, district, and provincial levels to strengthen the capacity of women and girls to participate in decision-making. This included the formation of women's groups in the target communities, which serve as platforms for stakeholder organization and capacity building. The program advocated for the inclusion of women and girls in decision-making with community leaders and the various bodies of sub-national government. The program was aimed to achieve:
• Increase meaningful participation of women and girls in decision-making processes.
• Create and expand inclusive spaces for dialogue and negotiation at the local and national levels.
• Increase attention on the importance of the rights of women and girls.
• Enable participation in political debates and dialogues with the Afghan authorities and public.
• Improved availability, accessibility and quality of girls’ education and health services.
TAGHEER conducted an end-line evaluation of the EVC to understand the achievement or lack thereof of the program against the above listed aims. The evaluation report developed by TAGHEER will serve as an input for the global evaluation report of EVC program in 6 countries. [83 Pages] Read More...

Informed to Influence: Increasing ethnic minority women’s access to information for improved governance and development

“Informed to influence: Increasing ethnic minority women’s access to information for improved governance and development” in Vietnam which supported a Network of Civil Society Organisations to represent the interests of ethnic minorities in Northern Vietnam, strengthened the voice of ethnic minority women through livelihood and rights clubs and contributed to the implementation of the Law on access to information. Read More...

Enhancing social protection by empowering CSOs in Bosnia and Herzegovina Midterm

In May, 2018, CARE International in cooperation with 7 project partners started implementation of the project: Enhancing social protection by empowering CSOs in Bosnia and Herzegovina – Financed by CZDA and CARE Czech Republic which will be realized within a three year timeframe (2018, 2019 and 2020).

The project is aimed to contribute to strengthening the weak social welfare and social protection as well as access to rights and social inclusion for the marginalized and most vulnerable. Poor economic performance and high unemployment cause shocks in the country’s social welfare system which largely effects the socio-economic position of citizens, especially most vulnerable and marginalized. The state and non-state service providers are under-capacitated and underfunded and their inability to provide adequate social protection services to the marginalized and most vulnerable populations has created a need and space for CSOs to get involved in the service provision. CSO efforts and involvement, however, have not been adequately recognized, supported and financed by the governmental institutions.

The evaluation of the impact of the initiative is done in line with the ToR that was created for the purpose of this assignment. The objective of the midterm evaluation is measuring the level of achievements of the objectives as well as level of satisfaction of project partners and other beneficiaries of the initiative. The evaluation process is internal and participatory with direct involvement of beneficiaries of the initiative. The midterm evaluation report includes report on implemented activities as well as lessons learned and recommendations.
Read More...

Enhancing social protection by empowering CSOs in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The CARE project team has collected and analysed baseline data regarding each project partner. The information collected has allowed us to have a clearer picture of each partners’ current capacity, needs and areas for further improvement. This information was collected during the last quarter of 2019 and is presented below for each partner organisation. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all