Civil Society and Governance

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
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Desk review to conduct assessment of ‘value for money’ provided through CARE International’s programmes to vulnerable and marginalised populations in Asia

This case study has been prepared as part of a study commissioned by CARE International (CI) to assess its long-term impact achieved in the Asia Pacific region between 2005 and 2010. As part of this process CI explored the extent to which socio-economic cost benefit analysis could be applied on a sample of CI projects, using an adapted form of the Social Return on Investment (SROI) methodology1.
The aim of the study was to gain a better understanding of CI’s ability to deliver added benefit and value to participating communities and their societies, given invested resources, whilst testing the feasibility of applying an adapted form of SROI to projects. The study is also expected to contribute to a wider discussion on the usefulness, and applicability, of demonstrating value for money within the contexts CI works.
Given CI’s focus on empowerment, and especially of marginalised and vulnerable women, this case study presents the analysis and findings of four projects: Plantation Community Empowerment Project (PCEP), Sri Lanka Social & Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU), Bangladesh Integrated Rural Development and Disaster Mitigation (IRDM), Cambodia Poverty Alleviation in Remote Upland Areas (PARUA), Laos
It is important to note that the projects selected for analysis were initiatives within wider programmes and, as such, were not intended to be illustrative of the overall programme’s magnitude or effectiveness. The SROI methodology is a good fit for CI’s projects due to its participatory nature and valuation of things that matter to stakeholders. However, due to the desk-based nature of this study, these findings should be seen as purely indicative as field research would be required to build a definitive and an accurate picture of impact. Read More...

Towards Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls (TESFA) Ex-Post Evaluation Report

TESFA project (Towards Improved Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls) was launched in 2010 which targeted ever-married adolescent girls’ economic status and reproductive health. The project envisioned to mitigate the effects of early marriage among ever-married adolescent girls in two woredas, Farta and Lay Gayint, of South Gondar zone in the Amhara regional state of Ethiopia. The project aimed to reach five thousand adolescent girls having marital history under the age of 19 in 25 kebeles in the two woredas, with the goal of achieving measurable positive change in their economic empowerment and sexual and reproductive health status. The project operated through four programmatic arms: Economic empowerment only (EE only), Sexual and reproductive health only (SRH-only), Economic empowerment with sexual and reproductive health (combined) and a delayed implementation arm (Delayed comparison).

This sustainability assessment (Ex-Post Evaluation) was conducted in the areas where TESFA project was implemented for three years to improve economic (EE-only), and sexual and reproductive health (SRH-only) outcomes for ever‐married adolescent girls (10 - 19 years old). The Ex-post evaluation is conducted four years after the completion of TESFA project to assess the sustainability and auto-replication of original girls groups formed by TESFA project. Qualitative approach with purposive sampling method was employed in this sustainability study. Ever married girls groups from the former TESFA project SRH and EE arms, SAA group members (Adult male and female community members) in the SRH Arm, and different level government officials such as Kebele Officials, Health Extension Workers (HEW) and experts from different government offices were participants in the study. Detail information about the group was pulled from archived documents at field office and mapping exercise was done by identifying the girl groups with the help of CARE field office and SAA members in each kebele prior to the focus groups and key-informant interviews. Read More...

Child, Early and Forced Marriage: CARE’s Global Experience

In two world regions—Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and the Asia Pacific—CARE has developed regional strategies on CEFM that galvanize influence with regional, national, and global bodies, support feminist movements, connect the local to the global, scale up and share strategies that work, and target popular media with positive images of equality.18 At the same time, CARE is working on the ground in high prevalence countries around the world. This document lays out CARE’s
approach and experience in CEFM prevention and mitigation across the globe. Read More...

Tipping Point Final Evaluation Phase One Nepal

Phase 1 of CARE’s Tipping Point project addressed child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in two districts of Nepal in partnership with Siddhartha Samudayik Samaj (SSS) and Dalit Social Development Centre (DSDC). In its first phase, the project promoted girls’ rights and choices regarding marriage in 16 communities using complementary approaches with collectives of girls, boys, and parents, who regularly participated in meetings, and advocacy events to raise public awareness and promote gender-equitable social norms. The project also engaged allies and potential champions for girls’ rights, including government and civil society, to help drive social change and direct more resources towards girls’ empowerment in project communities.
At the conclusion of Phase 1, an external evaluation team visited project sites in Kapilvastu and Rupandehi to conduct qualitative data collection with girls, boys, parents, and community members. The evaluation team’s findings indicate that Tipping Point’s iterative and adaptive strategies have contributed to several changes in the lives of girls, the actions of parents and community members to support girls, and social norms that promote gender equity. Read More...

Tipping Point Outcome Mapping Phase 1

CARE’S TIPPING POINT PROJECT addresses child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in Nepal and Bangladesh, two countries with high rates of child, early, and forced marriage (CEFM). The project focuses on identifying the root causes of child marriage and facilitates innovative strategies to create alternative paths for adolescent girls. The project conducted a Community Participatory Analysis (CPA) Study1 designed to deepen understanding of the contextual factors and root causes driving the prevalence of child marriage in distinctive regions within Nepal (two districts of the Terai; 16 municipal areas) and Bangladesh (one district in wetland areas; 90 villages) in the highly marginalized communities in which Tipping Point programming would take place. The CPA informed innovative and context-specific program design for local level strategies, including who to target, and contributed to the
development of approaches for monitoring and evaluation. As a learning and innovation initiative, the project is expected to contribute to the global understanding of the complex issues driving child marriage and different strategies that can contribute to a “tipping point” of sustainable change to prevent child marriage and create viable alternative paths for adolescent girls. Read More...

Promote the resilience of disaster affected urban populations in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

CARE International in Pakistan (CIP) implemented a Project title “Promote the resilience of disaster affected urban populations in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa” from June 01, 2017 to December 2018 in Peshawar with the primary focus on Community Based Disaster Risk Management, funded by European Commission Humanitarian Aid & Civil Protection (ECHO). The project was implemented in three Union Councils (UCs) of Peshawar district including Andar Shehr, Khalisa-1 and Khalisa-2 and targeted 39,147 beneficiaries including vulnerable women, men, disables, refugees and minorities. The project was also aimed at institutional development of Govt. departments on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR).

An external evaluation was carried out to collect quantitative and qualitative data through structured survey, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. The study was conducted in the project targeted UCs of Peshawar and with the stakeholders involved. The evaluation was based on Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development – Development Assistance Committee (OECD-DAC) criteria including relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability. In addition, the evaluation focused on project management and verification of DRR mitigation schemes rehabilitated.

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PROMESS II/GEWEP II Niger

CARE Norvège exécute le programme GEWEPII qui poursuit les efforts du GEWEPI (2014-2015) et le Women Empowerment Program (2009-2013), dans 6 pays dont le Niger. Au Niger, le GEWEPII est mis en oeuvre par le PROMEESSII. La vision ultime porte sur une pleine réalisation des droits socioéconomiques et politiques des femmes.
Le programme travaille dans 30 communes du Niger soit environ 10% de l’ensemble des communes du pays. Ces communes comptent près de 3 136 812 habitants, soit 16% de la population du pays. La phase II du PROMEESS court sur la période 2016-2019. L’évaluation endline intervient en fin 2018, et fournit des informations sur les principales réalisations (services, produits, et changements (effets) dans les conditions économiques, sociales et politiques des femmes. L’évaluation endline sanctionne la phase
actuelle, mais servira également de baseline (référence) pour la phase suivante. Read More...

Learning for Change: Strengthening Women’s Voices in East Africa

Learning for Change (L4C) Strengthening Women’s Voices in East Africa is a 3-year regional programme ending in March 2019. L4C has the aim of promoting the meaningful participation of women in decision-making processes at household, community, local and national levels in Ethiopia, Uganda and Rwanda. The programme is funded by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA)1, implemented by CARE Austria in cooperation with CARE Country Offices in Ethiopia, Uganda and Rwanda. It includes capacity development, and advocacy relating to the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda in Austria, at European Union level and in the Great Lakes Region. The programme directly contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially on Gender Equality (SDG5) and UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (UNSCR1325). Read More...

FANSER End of Project Evaluation: Knowledge, Attitudes & Practices Survey

This report presents the findings of an evaluation of the Food and Nutrition Security and Enhanced Resilience (FANSER) project implemented by CARE International in three wards in Katete District of the Eastern province of Zambia. The main objectives of the study were: to describe the nutrition situation among the FANSER target groups in Katete District i.e. assess the IDDS-W, IDDS-C; to assess the nutrition-related behaviours i.e. examine knowledge, attitudes, behaviours and practices related to agriculture, health, nutrition, hygiene and health practices of mothers (15-49 years old) and children (<2 years); and women empowerment; and to document evidence, lessons learned and good practices to inform future nutrition programming. The assessment utilized a mixed methods approach to collect data on project interventions in order to assess the impact of the project.
Using the global Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) platform, CARE International in Zambia with funding from GIZ under the “One World No Hunger” Initiative of the German Government, implemented various nutrition interventions to building capacity of staff and community volunteers to promote the production, preparation and consumption of diverse foods in Katete District particularly in Chimtende, Vulamkoko and Chimwa wards. This came from the realization that rural areas are more prone and vulnerable to malnutrition and deficiency diseases. The main goal of the project was to ensure that the food and nutrition security and dietary diversity of women of reproductive age and children under the age of two, in Katete district is improved. Read More...

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