Inclusive Governance

Baseline Survey Report for a WASH project in West Mosul

This is a baseline survey report for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage System" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
There are two priority issues to be addressed by this project: a) significant health risks posed by accumulation of solid waste in key arteries of West Mosul (Cree stream), precluding the effective flow of gray water towards the river as well as damaged pipes which serve to remove black water from residential areas (Al-Thawra neighborhood), and b) limited civic engagement and ownership of residential environment, resulting in poor communal hygiene practices and a high burden on local authorities, which are operating under severely reduced capacity to address needs.
A base-line survey was conducted to identify the current water, hygiene and sanitation conditions in the neighborhood, beneficiaries’ specific needs (disaggregated by men, women, boys and girls) and overall awareness towards water, hygiene and sanitation measures. In order to measure the impact of this projects base line data will be evaluated against end line data collected after project closure. Read More...

Endline evaluation of WASH project in West Mosul, Iraq

This is an endline evaluation for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage Systems" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
This project addressed critical needs for sanitation services in West Mosul, as a direct contribution to enable the affected populations to return home. The project aimed to repair two vital sanitation resources/infrastructure in West Mosul and to support the municipal authorities to build their capacity to eventually recover their costs, once the situation allows. Finally, the project intended to mobilize local communities towards greater ownership for their local environment, to avoid the recurrence of such sanitation risks and maintain a cleaner, more habitable environment. In addition to mitigate a number of health risks related to poor sanitation in urban areas, CARE’s engagement aimed to promote social cohesion and community participation among vulnerable populations affected by the conflict.
The End-line project Evaluation is intended to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements and success of the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men,
women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The Evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations that project staff and the stakeholders might use to improve the design and implementation of other related projects and programs. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

EUROPEAN NEIGHBOURHOOD PROGRAMME FOR AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT – GEORGIA (ENPARD III) – SUPPORT TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIVELIHOODS IN DISADVANTAGED RURAL REGIONS OF GEORGIA (APRIL 2019)

Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) started the “Implementing LEADER in Mestia municipality for better livelihoods in high mountainous regions of Georgia” in 2019. The project aims to improve the livelihoods of vulnerable households in Mestia Municipality, a remote high mountainous region of Georgia. The project aims to support both economic and social well-being. To do so, the project will attempt to improve the diversification and competitiveness of the rural economy, the inclusion of vulnerable groups, and the sustainable management of natural resources in Mestia Municipality. The LEADER approach, which the project takes, uses a bottom-up approach to rural development. The project will be implemented over the course of four years, concluding in February 2022.
In support of this goal, CARE commissioned the Caucasus Research Resource Centers Georgia (CRRC Georgia) to carry outa gendered political economy analysis as a baseline report. The results of the baseline data collection activities are presented in this report. The research project aims to look into three broad areas within Mestia Municipality including inclusive governance, service delivery, and markets.To provide data on these subjects, the project used a mixed methods approach, including: desk research, focus groups, key informant interviews, and a survey. Read More...

Learning for Change (L4C): Strengthening Women’s Voices in East Africa (Ethiopia, Rwanda, Uganda)

CARE Austria, together with CARE Ethiopia, CARE Uganda and CARE Rwanda, has been implementing a three-year regional programme, “Learning for Change (L4C): Strengthening Women’s Voices in East Africa”, financed by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and CARE Austria. The programme started from 1st April 2016 to 31st March 2019. The core of this programme was organisational capacity development to support transforming gender norms.
The objective was: “268,622 women and girls are meaningfully participating in decision-making at household, community,
local and national levels”. The programme theory of change defined three expected results areas (ERs) to reach this objective:
ER 1: Improved organisational climate in partner organisations and CARE reflects transformative GED and psychosocial wellbeing.
ER 2: Programmes and knowledge systems reflect an integrated gender transformative approach in the design, implementation and reporting of CARE and partners.
ER 3: Women’s voices influence strategic forums concerning women, peace and security at national and international levels (contributing to the implementation of UN Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820). The L4C programme partners have included: CARE Austria; CARE Ethiopia with 5 government partners; CARE Uganda with 7 NGO partners; and CARE Rwanda with 6 NGO partners.
The main objective of the evaluation is to assess, measure and present the progress and success of the implementation of the L4C program (outputs and outcomes), draw out lessons learnt and provide recommendations based on these findings. The methodologies of the evaluation have included documents review; key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and self-completed most significant change (MSC) tools; reflection and review workshops; qualitative analysis; and presentation at a validation workshop. Read More...

Final Evaluation of “Promoting Peace in East Darfur”

This report presents the findings of the field work for the final evaluation of the CIS project "Promoting Peace in East Darfur" funded by the United Nations Development Programme/Darfur Community Peace and Stability Fund (UNDP/DCPSF) for a period of two years (2016-2018). Initiated in 2007/08, the DCPSF supports peace and stability in Darfur by strengthening community-based reconciliation mechanisms (CBRMs), providing livelihoods support, promoting effective natural resources management, and building and linking networks among peace building actors and initiatives in Darfur. This founded on processes of dialogue and consultations and addresses root causes of conflict through various activities that provide dividends of peace in Darfur while paving the way for early recovery in the Region.
The evaluation approach and methodology included desk review of the project reports, meetings and focus group discussions.
The report concludes that the project is highly relevant to the contextual realities in the targeted areas in particular and East Darfur State in general and the needs and priorities of the communities. The impact of the project can be clearly seen in conflict reduction, success of communities in conflict management and resolution and empowering women and youth. The senior State Government officials, who were met by the consultant, informed that they have attended a number of joint events organized by the Rizeigat and Maalia communities. Tribal leaders, youth and women participated in these joint events, exchange visits. The youth from the two communities organized football matches in an effort to make sports a vehicle for peace. These efforts have resulted in the establishment of the State level conflict resolution network. The report recommends more support to some CBRMs to increase their efficiency and improve their performance. It is also recommended that CARE International Sudan respond to the requests made by its partners for extending the project duration or replicating it in other areas. Read More...

Addressing Root Causes Project in South Sudan

The Addressing Root Causes (ARC) project that started in September 2016, aims at tackling the root causes of armed conflict, instability and irregular migration in South Sudan by increasing community resilience to conflict-related and economically-induced shocks in 19 payams in Jonglei state in the counties of Pibor, Twic East, Duk and Bor. The project has distinguished three outcomes areas: Economic Resilience, Peaceful Conflict Resolution and Social Cohesion which are expected to be mutually reinforcing and when all are combined and stregthened together, the beneficial effects will contribute to more resilience and a culture of peace.
This mid-term review was conducted to assess the progress of project implementation since September 2016, and document best practices and lessons learned to inform key stakeholders on future activity design, programming, and implementation. Primary data was collected using household survey, key Informant Interviews and Focus Group Discussions with the targeted communities. Combined with the FGD, a Social Norm Analysis Plot (SNAP) framework was applied as it was considered best suited to measure changes in social (gender) norms.
Key findings from review indicate access to loans and training of VSLA groups is empowering women and youth in the targeted communities to engage in IGAs and micro-enterprises, thereby broadening their livelihood and resilience options and creating market linkages with traders across different ethnic communities. Further, more women and youth reported being confident to participate in economic opportunities and possess relevant tools and skills; and the role of women and youth is being appreciated in contributing to meeting household needs, thereby reflecting the conflict and gender transformation in the targeted communities. It should however be noted that more VSLAs have been formed and are engaged in IGAs and micro-enterprises in Duk and Twic East compared to Bor and Pibor.
Also, peace committees are appreciated and recognized by the targeted communities for facilitating and using peaceful mechanisms to mitigate and resolve intra and – inter community conflict and reconcile past grievances. Most project beneficiaries also reported increased collaboration with each other, and feel have more positive relationships and trust within and beyond their community. Read More...

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
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Desk review to conduct assessment of ‘value for money’ provided through CARE International’s programmes to vulnerable and marginalised populations in Asia

This case study has been prepared as part of a study commissioned by CARE International (CI) to assess its long-term impact achieved in the Asia Pacific region between 2005 and 2010. As part of this process CI explored the extent to which socio-economic cost benefit analysis could be applied on a sample of CI projects, using an adapted form of the Social Return on Investment (SROI) methodology1.
The aim of the study was to gain a better understanding of CI’s ability to deliver added benefit and value to participating communities and their societies, given invested resources, whilst testing the feasibility of applying an adapted form of SROI to projects. The study is also expected to contribute to a wider discussion on the usefulness, and applicability, of demonstrating value for money within the contexts CI works.
Given CI’s focus on empowerment, and especially of marginalised and vulnerable women, this case study presents the analysis and findings of four projects: Plantation Community Empowerment Project (PCEP), Sri Lanka Social & Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU), Bangladesh Integrated Rural Development and Disaster Mitigation (IRDM), Cambodia Poverty Alleviation in Remote Upland Areas (PARUA), Laos
It is important to note that the projects selected for analysis were initiatives within wider programmes and, as such, were not intended to be illustrative of the overall programme’s magnitude or effectiveness. The SROI methodology is a good fit for CI’s projects due to its participatory nature and valuation of things that matter to stakeholders. However, due to the desk-based nature of this study, these findings should be seen as purely indicative as field research would be required to build a definitive and an accurate picture of impact. Read More...

Towards Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls (TESFA) Ex-Post Evaluation Report

TESFA project (Towards Improved Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls) was launched in 2010 which targeted ever-married adolescent girls’ economic status and reproductive health. The project envisioned to mitigate the effects of early marriage among ever-married adolescent girls in two woredas, Farta and Lay Gayint, of South Gondar zone in the Amhara regional state of Ethiopia. The project aimed to reach five thousand adolescent girls having marital history under the age of 19 in 25 kebeles in the two woredas, with the goal of achieving measurable positive change in their economic empowerment and sexual and reproductive health status. The project operated through four programmatic arms: Economic empowerment only (EE only), Sexual and reproductive health only (SRH-only), Economic empowerment with sexual and reproductive health (combined) and a delayed implementation arm (Delayed comparison).

This sustainability assessment (Ex-Post Evaluation) was conducted in the areas where TESFA project was implemented for three years to improve economic (EE-only), and sexual and reproductive health (SRH-only) outcomes for ever‐married adolescent girls (10 - 19 years old). The Ex-post evaluation is conducted four years after the completion of TESFA project to assess the sustainability and auto-replication of original girls groups formed by TESFA project. Qualitative approach with purposive sampling method was employed in this sustainability study. Ever married girls groups from the former TESFA project SRH and EE arms, SAA group members (Adult male and female community members) in the SRH Arm, and different level government officials such as Kebele Officials, Health Extension Workers (HEW) and experts from different government offices were participants in the study. Detail information about the group was pulled from archived documents at field office and mapping exercise was done by identifying the girl groups with the help of CARE field office and SAA members in each kebele prior to the focus groups and key-informant interviews. Read More...

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