Conflict Mitigation

Baseline Survey Report for a WASH project in West Mosul

This is a baseline survey report for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage System" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
There are two priority issues to be addressed by this project: a) significant health risks posed by accumulation of solid waste in key arteries of West Mosul (Cree stream), precluding the effective flow of gray water towards the river as well as damaged pipes which serve to remove black water from residential areas (Al-Thawra neighborhood), and b) limited civic engagement and ownership of residential environment, resulting in poor communal hygiene practices and a high burden on local authorities, which are operating under severely reduced capacity to address needs.
A base-line survey was conducted to identify the current water, hygiene and sanitation conditions in the neighborhood, beneficiaries’ specific needs (disaggregated by men, women, boys and girls) and overall awareness towards water, hygiene and sanitation measures. In order to measure the impact of this projects base line data will be evaluated against end line data collected after project closure. Read More...

Endline evaluation of WASH project in West Mosul, Iraq

This is an endline evaluation for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage Systems" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
This project addressed critical needs for sanitation services in West Mosul, as a direct contribution to enable the affected populations to return home. The project aimed to repair two vital sanitation resources/infrastructure in West Mosul and to support the municipal authorities to build their capacity to eventually recover their costs, once the situation allows. Finally, the project intended to mobilize local communities towards greater ownership for their local environment, to avoid the recurrence of such sanitation risks and maintain a cleaner, more habitable environment. In addition to mitigate a number of health risks related to poor sanitation in urban areas, CARE’s engagement aimed to promote social cohesion and community participation among vulnerable populations affected by the conflict.
The End-line project Evaluation is intended to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements and success of the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men,
women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The Evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations that project staff and the stakeholders might use to improve the design and implementation of other related projects and programs. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

Final Evaluation of “Promoting Peace in East Darfur”

This report presents the findings of the field work for the final evaluation of the CIS project "Promoting Peace in East Darfur" funded by the United Nations Development Programme/Darfur Community Peace and Stability Fund (UNDP/DCPSF) for a period of two years (2016-2018). Initiated in 2007/08, the DCPSF supports peace and stability in Darfur by strengthening community-based reconciliation mechanisms (CBRMs), providing livelihoods support, promoting effective natural resources management, and building and linking networks among peace building actors and initiatives in Darfur. This founded on processes of dialogue and consultations and addresses root causes of conflict through various activities that provide dividends of peace in Darfur while paving the way for early recovery in the Region.
The evaluation approach and methodology included desk review of the project reports, meetings and focus group discussions.
The report concludes that the project is highly relevant to the contextual realities in the targeted areas in particular and East Darfur State in general and the needs and priorities of the communities. The impact of the project can be clearly seen in conflict reduction, success of communities in conflict management and resolution and empowering women and youth. The senior State Government officials, who were met by the consultant, informed that they have attended a number of joint events organized by the Rizeigat and Maalia communities. Tribal leaders, youth and women participated in these joint events, exchange visits. The youth from the two communities organized football matches in an effort to make sports a vehicle for peace. These efforts have resulted in the establishment of the State level conflict resolution network. The report recommends more support to some CBRMs to increase their efficiency and improve their performance. It is also recommended that CARE International Sudan respond to the requests made by its partners for extending the project duration or replicating it in other areas. Read More...

Addressing Root Causes Project in South Sudan

The Addressing Root Causes (ARC) project that started in September 2016, aims at tackling the root causes of armed conflict, instability and irregular migration in South Sudan by increasing community resilience to conflict-related and economically-induced shocks in 19 payams in Jonglei state in the counties of Pibor, Twic East, Duk and Bor. The project has distinguished three outcomes areas: Economic Resilience, Peaceful Conflict Resolution and Social Cohesion which are expected to be mutually reinforcing and when all are combined and stregthened together, the beneficial effects will contribute to more resilience and a culture of peace.
This mid-term review was conducted to assess the progress of project implementation since September 2016, and document best practices and lessons learned to inform key stakeholders on future activity design, programming, and implementation. Primary data was collected using household survey, key Informant Interviews and Focus Group Discussions with the targeted communities. Combined with the FGD, a Social Norm Analysis Plot (SNAP) framework was applied as it was considered best suited to measure changes in social (gender) norms.
Key findings from review indicate access to loans and training of VSLA groups is empowering women and youth in the targeted communities to engage in IGAs and micro-enterprises, thereby broadening their livelihood and resilience options and creating market linkages with traders across different ethnic communities. Further, more women and youth reported being confident to participate in economic opportunities and possess relevant tools and skills; and the role of women and youth is being appreciated in contributing to meeting household needs, thereby reflecting the conflict and gender transformation in the targeted communities. It should however be noted that more VSLAs have been formed and are engaged in IGAs and micro-enterprises in Duk and Twic East compared to Bor and Pibor.
Also, peace committees are appreciated and recognized by the targeted communities for facilitating and using peaceful mechanisms to mitigate and resolve intra and – inter community conflict and reconcile past grievances. Most project beneficiaries also reported increased collaboration with each other, and feel have more positive relationships and trust within and beyond their community. Read More...

Women’s Empowerment Program (WEP) Midterm Report

In 2009, Norad-funded women empowerment programs (WEPs) started implementation in seven countries: Burundi, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. In 2009 and early 2010, an extensive quantitative baseline study was conducted in these countries around a common set of indicators. The present mid-term review (MTR), which was done using qualitative methodology, analysed in depth the process and nature of changes that the programs are contributing towards. In all the program countries, the country WEP team carried out the review internally with the technical assistance of an external consultant and CARE Norway (CN).

With slight variations, the overall objectives of the country WEPs focused on the economic, social, and political empowerment of women. The village savings and loan association (VSLA) methodology was common for all the programs; and these groups create the platform for working on other aspects of the program besides economic empowerment. The initial changes that the programs produce are seen in terms of increased access to savings and loans, employment opportunities, and asset ownership. The ability of the women to earn income, generate their own savings and make financial contributions in the household (HH) has greatly improved their self-esteem, thereby giving them better leverage to involve in and influence HH decision making processes. Men were highly appreciative of the income women were able to bring in to the family as a result of being involved in VSLAs. Through their improved position in the household, women reported being able to negotiate the use of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and the abandonment of different harmful practices. Through the use of couples-based approach and engaging men initiatives, HH relationships are beginning to improve; men in these households are reportedly starting to have a more positive attitude towards women’s empowerment and are themselves even taking part in domestic activities in some contexts. The VSLA approach is enabling women to create strong social networks that are becoming an influential force for social change. As a result of increased knowledge on their human rights and increasing leadership skills, women are beginning to understand how they have to position themselves to realize their strategic interests. The VSLA groups and networks also enable women to mobilise support when they are running for elections; this support has increased number of women being elected into different posts. The contribution of women in VSLAs and in community leadership positions is being increasingly recognised and appreciated by local authority figures, which can be seen when they actively seek the advice of women and VSL groups in relation to different community development initiatives.
Through working in partnership with others, the programs are being implemented in a high quality and timely manner. Engagement with strategic partners has occurred effectively in some countries, and been instrumental in enabling the programs to link grassroots evidence to national level advocacy activities which have achieved concrete results. [52 pages] Read More...

Women’s Empowerment Program (WEP) 2009-2013

CARE Norway, collaborating CARE country offices (COs), and partners have from 2009 through 2013 run the “Women Empowerment Programme” (WEP). With funding from NORAD, it has been implemented in Mali, Niger, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Myanmar and DRC (from 2013).

The results presented in this report derive from CARE’s monitoring systems, thematic assessments and research done over the 5 years. This final report is intended to give NORAD an overview of key results within the program’s four thematic focus areas: 1)Women’s Economic Empowerment, 2)Women’s Participation in Decision Making, 3) Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and 4) Prevention and Mitigation of Gender-based violence. In agreement with NORAD, the end-line evaluation of the WEP is due in May 2015. [55 pages] Read More...

Sociedades Inclusivas e Interculturales Impacto Del Programa

En Ecuador CARE busca combatir la pobreza y la injusticia social que afectan de manera desproporcionada a niñas, adolescentes y mujeres afrodescendientes, indígenas, sobrevivientes de violencia de género, que viven en comunidades afectadas por desastres naturales, el cambio climático y que han sido forzadas a desplazarse de sus comunidades de origen por crisis y conflictos bélicos. Para ello, su enfoque de trabajo consiste en generar alianzas y fortalecer las capacidades de las mujeres, de sus familias, de líderes locales y nacionales y de entidades públicas, con el fin de asegurar una vida libre de violencia y el pleno ejercicio de los derechos humanos al mayor número posible de mujeres y hombres en el país. [46 pages] Read More...

PRIME: Endline Survey Report

PRIME, a five-year project, was launched in 2012 to help vulnerable pastoralist communities become more resilient to shocks of this nature. Led by Mercy Corps, PRIME is a consortium of 10 organizations whose main objective is to reduce poverty and hunger in the drought-prone Afar, Oromiya and Somali regions. To accomplish these objectives, PRIME implements market- driven approaches to livestock production and livelihood diversification that simultaneously support dryland communities to adapt to a changing climate. As part of its project activities, PRIME developed a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan to assess the project's overall impact and the performance of related indicators (impact, outcome and output), and custom indicators on animal health services and the dietary diversity of infants and pregnant and lactating women. [64 pages] Read More...

Tufaidike Wote

Le but global du projet a été de renforcer la stabilité socio-économiques des populations dans les communautés à travers la promotion des mécanismes de gestion et prévention des conflits, de bonne gouvernance et les moyens de subsistances avec un accent particulier sur le statut de la femme. Le but de cette évaluation a été de mieux comprendre les stratégies qui ont bien marché et les changements produits au cours de l’exécution du projet ‘Tufaidike Wote’ afin de mieux informer la programmation d’un tel projet dans le futur. De manière spécifique, l’évaluation a voulu déterminer dans quelle mesure le projet a eu un impact, notamment en ce qui concerne la dynamique sociale et la dynamique économique et évaluer dans quelles conditions et contextes et pourquoi ces changements ont eu lieu. Elle a voulu aussi analyser la mise en œuvre de la stratégie à réponse rapide par le mécanisme de fonds flexible, si oui ou non elle a contribué à la cohésion sociale dans les communautés à potentiel conflictuel. Read More...

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