Economic Development

Improving Access to Safe Employment For Migrant Women in Myanmar

CARE International in Myanmar (CIM) implemented “Improving Access to Safe Employment for Migrant Women in urban Myanmar” (hereinafter referred to as “The Project”) between July 2013 and 30 June 2017, with funding from CARE Australia (CAUST), under the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s (DFAT) Australian NGO Cooperation Agreement Partnership (ANCP), with a total AU$2.5 million. [43 pages] Read More...

A-Card Progress and Prospects

A-card (A stands for Agriculture) is a brand new micro-credit mechanism, the only example in Bangladesh aimed at providing smallholder farmers financing to a digital purchase of farm inputs at a low cost (10%) through the formal financial system linked to a debit card and ICT-enabled platforms.

Addressing the problem of smallholder farmers' lack of access to finance required a consultation among different stakeholders particularly in finding an effective solution. It eventually led to the idea and design of the A-card model. In this regard, the USAID Agricultural Extension Support Activity (AESA) project's interventions effectively engaged with different stakeholders, including small-holder farmers, microfinance institutions (MFIs), formal lenders (i.e. banks) and rural agricultural inputs retailers. The aim of this collaboration was to work for a common goal with differentiated responsibilities. [14 pages] Read More...

A-Card Pilot Initiative Impact Assessment

mSTAR/Bangladesh, working with the Agriculture Extension Support Activity (AESA) led by Dhaka Ahsania Mission (DAM), conducted pre- and postassessments in Faridpur district to understand the impact that a micro-credit product (called A-Card) delivered to smallholder farmers through Bank Asia’s agent banking had on participating farmers, associated ag-input retailers, and other relevant stakeholders, as well as to understand what further action can be taken to improve uptake of these services.
This report includes findings from the pre- and post-assessment surveys, beginning with farmers and retailers’ demographic information, including age, sex and education; as well as their mobile phone ownership, access and usage patterns. It also examines the knowledge and perceptions that stakeholders have of digital financial services (DFS), in addition to their perceived benefits from A-Card, associated challenges, and opportunities to scale up. In addition, this report includes some findings from a separate survey conducted solely by AESA. It concludes with recommendations based on the findings and feedback from stakeholders. [28 pages] Read More...

Krishi Utsho 2017 Annual Report

Krishi Utsho has emerged as a transformative social enterprise over the past several years as a way to identify and bring about progressive advancement in the lives of small holder farmers. As a social enterprise Krishi Utsho (KU) is equivalent to a hybrid of social sector intervention and pure business entrepreneurship, a social venture that can address problems of self-sustainability in a social intervention initiative. To succeed, these ventures must adhere to both social goals and financial viability. Typically, this project’s aim is to benefit small holder farmers, in particular women. It aims to permanently transform their lives by altering a prevailing socioeconomic equilibrium that works to their disadvantage. More importantly, the beneficiary group is an economically disadvantaged or marginalized segment of society that doesn’t have the means to transform its social or economic prospects without assistance. To that end, project focuses on the most important yet often neglected, agricultural sector. [47 pages] Read More...

Final evaluation of the FFP programme

The Foundations For Peace (FFP) programme received a grant of EUR 7,602,035 under the Reconstruction Tender from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The programme was implemented in Afghanistan, Yemen and Somalia1 during 1 July 2012 - 30 June 2016. The FFP programme aimed at addressing the underlying causes that inhibit human security and sustainable development in countries in (or at high risk of) violent conflict and was operationalised into 3 outcomes: (1) Capacity building of civil society on conflict prevention and resolution, (2) Improved role of women and youth (male/ female) in governance and (3) Improved economic opportunities for women and youth. The nature of the FFP programme differed per country as the outcomes were adapted to fit the local country contexts. In Afghanistan there was a strong focus on women's rights whereas in Yemen the focus was on providing (economic) opportunities to youth at risk of falling into conflict. [70 pages] Read More...

The Foundation for Peace (FFP) Midterm Report

This Report presents the findings, assessment and recommendations of the Mid-Term Review of the Foundation for Peace (FFP) Project that organizes 6,000 women into 300 Advocacy groups under its women’s right component and another 3,000 women under its livelihood component. The lifetime of the Project is July 2010 to June 2016. The Project is being implemented in 140 communities of Kabul, Nangarhar, and Mazar provinces by CARE Afghanistan and two of its partners – and is funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands.
The Project’s main goal is to “contribute to stability and development in Afghanistan by strengthening the socio economic and political position of women in Balkh, Nangarhar, and Kabul by the end of 2016”." [68 pages] Read More...

Zimbabwe ‘Cash First’ Humanitarian Response 2015–2017 Evaluation report

This report is an independent evaluation of the DFID-funded Zimbabwe Humanitarian Response 2015–2017, produced by Oxford Policy Management (OPM) in association with Humanitarian Outcomes. The evaluation was commissioned by CARE International in Zimbabwe. The evaluation was led by Andrew Kardan and the qualitative data collection was led by Sarah Bailey. An incountry workshop on the findings was conducted by Paul Harvey and Andrew Kardan. The evaluation’s design and research were also supported by Molly Scott, Marta Favara, Chris Hearle and Helen Morris. The qualitative data collection was conducted with support from Jimat Consulting. Finally Sheila Chikulo provided peer review inputs. [107 page] Read More...

Youth Empowerment Project Baseline Survey Report

In June 2014, Care International embarked on a baseline study for the Sida- funded Youth Empowerment Programme (YEP) in Zimbabwe. The study was done by a team comprising CARE International in Zimbabwe, its partners and an external consultant in nine of the eleven districts covered by YEP. The purpose of the study was to establish comprehensive baseline information that will be used to measure programme outcomes and impacts. The study would also serve as a benchmark for future measurement of the performance of the programme in contributing towards its overall goal of ‘increased economic and social participation of male and female youths in Zimbabwe.’ [90 pages] Read More...

Youth Empowerment Project End of Project Narrative Report

Premised on the unifying framework for poverty eradication and social justice, the Youth Empowerment Project (YEP) funded by the Embassy of Sweden in Zimbabwe (EoS) was developed to address individual, household and community level constraints that impact on the ability of youth to move out of poverty. The project was informed by conclusions drawn from the Youth Sector Analysis commissioned by the Embassy of Sweden in 2012 and emerging issues and recommendations from the Kupfuma Ishungu Microfinance Project (KIMFP) final evaluation results/findings. Initially a three year project starting November 2013 YEP was extended by a further three months to end in January 2017. [63 pages] Read More...

LFSP APN Rural Finance Technical Assistance Facility Phase 2

The quarter under review witnessed an exponential growth of MicroPlan’s portfolio under the Rural Finance Project. The total number of clients almost doubled from an annual 2016 cumulative figure of 982 in December 2016 to 1786 clients by March 2017 representing an 81% client growth (804 clients) across the five branches within three months. The total rural finance loan portfolio grew by 55% from annual cumulative total of USD 629, 726 in December 2016 to USD 975,947.75 in March 2017. This growth demonstrates the financial institution’s ability to create business and claim a significant market share in the rural areas and move the rural branches towards sustainability and profitability for long term operation in rural areas. [16 pages] Read More...

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