Education

Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) In Afghanistan: Final Evaluation

CARE has been a major player in the education sector in Afghanistan since 1994 implementing CBE programs. The overall aim of CARE Afghanistan’s education projects is to provide greater access to quality basic education for school age children, with a specific focus on girls, in remote areas of Afghanistan where Ministry of Education (MoE) schools are not accessible. To cater to cultural norms, the programs have provided culturally acceptable, quality community based educational opportunities to particularly attract girls and assure their families of a safe, acceptable learning environment. The program puts major emphasis on helping communities gain the skills and knowledge they need to take their children’s education into their own hands. Women are encouraged to play a key role. Bringing positive attitudinal and behavioral changes in communities towards girls’ education and retention of female teachers substantially increases the sustainability of the schools and girls’ access for their future positive engagement in society. CARE’s projects are currently providing educational opportunities to more than 18,000 children across six provinces. CARE’s CBE work has contributed significantly to the shaping of CBE policy in Afghanistan, as CARE continues to work in close coordination with the Ministry of Education (MoE) and collaboratively with NGOs through different CBE consortia working across the country. The Community Based Education Enrichment Program (CBEEP) was part of a larger endeavor of the Assessment of Learning Outcomes and Social Effect in Community Based Education (ALSE) research project. A similar parallel community-based education (CBE) program was being implemented by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in the provinces of Herat, Ghor, Daykundi and Bamyan. The project goal was to enhance increased equitable access to safe, quality basic education and learning opportunities for Afghan children, especially girls. The evaluation provides an opportunity to gain a wider understanding of the overall achievements of the project and how the key evaluation questions of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and impact have been answered. Read More...

Community Based Education Project

This evaluation assessed the project "Community-Based Education" (July 2011 – June 2014). The project aimed at facilitating government delivery of quality basic education (grades 1-9) in 120 community-based classes (96 primary and 24 lower secondary) to 3,154 children, living in areas where public education services are not available in Ghazni, Kapisa and Khost provinces.
The evaluation took place from September to November 2014, with fieldwork in October 2014. It involved a total of 464 participants (42% female) through an on-line self-assessment questionnaire, beneficiary survey and in-depth interviews in Kabul and around a random sample of 44 CBE classes in the three provinces. All data and steps used for the sample selection, data cleaning and analysis
can be fully reproduced with the codebooks presented in the annexes to this report.
The results indicate that the project is highly relevant considering the needs and priorities of its target groups, as well as CARE's Policy Strategy Framework and the policy scenario. Read More...

Baseline Evaluation: Partners for Learning – P4L

Key results of the project evaluation

In the P4L intervention areas, we estimated that approximately 5.7 % 1 of children are out of school girls and boys (OOSGB) who come from most rural households (72%), in female-headed households (63%), and extremely poor and their education expenses consume a large part of their global expenses (59%). Most of the surveyed OOSGB are between the ages of 7-14 (66%) without a large difference regarding their sex (girls or boys).

The dropout situation was measured; it is estimated to at a level of 3% mostly in the rural areas (77%) and more frequent among older children from 15-17 years (6.6%). The reasons for non-enrollment or dropout are varied and among others we will mention: High domestic workload for the children; Children’s participation in agricultural activities; Lack of economic means to pay fees, material, textbooks, shoes, and/or uniform; Lack of identification documents (baptismal certificate / birth certificate / national ID) for enrolment; Repeated teacher absences, caused often by strike; Hunger (absence of school feeding program); Distance between home and school.

Main recommendations / perspectives

Considering the results obtained from the data analysis some keys actions are recommended such as more campaigns for providing a ID document to each children; more awareness campaigns to reduce children’s workload until the total elimination of the child labor exists; more awareness activities for enrolling children at the normal school age (5-6 years) regardless of their sex; sensitization for parents around community-based retention and consistent attendance of their children at school; and by increased support to families to raise their household income. Read More...

Measuring Social Norms and Girls’ Empowerment Report of the SenseMaker study of the

This report presents the findings from a SenseMaker story collection process conducted as part of a qualitative evaluation of CARE International’s Tipping Point project in Sunamganj, Bangladesh. Tipping Point aims to reduce the incidence of child marriage through shifting social norms at the community level, addressing the root causes of the practice and seeking to holistically effect change at the level of individuals, communities, and the broader enabling environment. The SenseMaker study was conducted by the Overseas Development Institute and researchers from Jahangirnagar University, in close cooperation with Tipping Point’s two local implementing
partners, JASHIS and ASD in Sunamganj district. The evaluation team collected 875 stories in total: 325 from girls; 214 from boys; and 336 from mothers and fathers of adolescents.

The primary analytical approach for assessing the nature of change within Tipping Point communities was comparing the data from Boundary Partners (girls and boys who participate in Tipping Point ‘Fun Centre’ groups, and parents of adolescents who participate in Fun Centre groups) with data from non-Boundary Partners from the same village. Read More...

EVALUATION FINALE DU PROJET LEAD « INTEGRATION DE LA REDEVABILITE SOCIALE DANS L’EDUCATION POUR LES DEVELOPPEMENT »

Le présent rapport clôture le processus d’évaluation finale du projet « Intégration de la redevabilité sociale dans l’éducation pour le développement » (LEAD), réalisé dans le cadre d’un partenariat signé entre l’organisation CARE International Maroc (CIM) et le « Global Partnership for Social Accountability » (GPSA) de la Banque Mondiale (BM). Il est mis en oeuvre au Maroc par CARE International Maroc et la Near East Foundation (NEF) pour une durée de quatre ans du 30 Septembre 2014 au 30 Septembre 2018 pour un budget global de 720 000 USD. Read More...

Evidence of Change In Gender Equality and Women‘s Empowerment in the Balkans 2005-2012

This is a report about CARE’s work to advance gender equality in the Balkans and what we have achieved over the past seven years. Our goal is to give account and to demonstrate our commitment to change the lives of the people we serve. We want to illustrate the real life impact of the work we do with our partners and to document the process, methods and the tools used. We want to show that what we and partners have achieved, is relevant to the regional context and that our approaches and methodologies make a demonstrable difference. We also want to learn from our challenges and limitations, and we will use these lessons in our future work. Read More...

Safe Schools for Girls Project Midline Evaluation

Throughout the past two decades, Rwanda has made significant efforts to improve the coverage of education to ensure that all Rwandans have access to quality education through the completion of secondary school. Despite policies to increase access to basic education and increase enrolment rates, dropout remains a key issue, especially in secondary school where female students tend to have lower completion rates than male students.

To promote better educational, social, and economic outcomes for students, CARE Rwanda established the Safe Schools for Girls (SS4G) Project. Operating in the Southern Province of Rwanda, the SS4G Project provided holistic support--including academic resources, financial literacy training, and sexual and reproductive health education, and leadership training--to students to address obstacles to secondary education. As the SS4G project passes its mid-way point in 2019, CARE Rwanda commissioned this evaluation to assess trends and changes over time in students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the intervention aims, in order to better understand areas that were performing well and identify those that needed revised efforts. Read More...

Better Environment for Education Project Endline

Throughout the past two decades, Rwanda has made significant efforts to improve the coverage of education to ensure that all Rwandans have access to quality education through the completion of secondary school. Despite policies to increase access to basic education and increase enrolment rates, dropout remains a key issue, especially in secondary school where female students tend to have lower completion rates than male students.
To promote better educational, social, and economic outcomes for students, CARE Rwanda established the Better Environment for Education (BEE) Project. Operating in the Western Province of Rwanda, the BEE Project provided holistic support--including academic resources, financial literacy training, and sexual and reproductive health education, and leadership training--to students to address obstacles to secondary education. As the BEE project neared its conclusion in 2019, CARE Rwanda commissioned this endline evaluation to assess trends and changes over time in students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the intervention’s aims. Read More...

Steps Towards Afghan Girls Educational Success II Mid Term Review

As part of the Girls Education Challenge-Transition (GEC-T) program, Steps Towards Afghan Girls’ Educational Success-II (STAGES-II) is expanding its work from GEC-1 to implement community-based education (CBE) to marginalised girls in 16 provinces of Afghanistan. STAGES-II is building on past activities and learning to introduce a new focus on transition, particularly the transition of girls from primary to secondary school education. The project aims to contribute to the learning and transition outcomes of 22,290 girls enrolled in primary- and lower-secondary community-based education (CBE) and accelerated learning programs (ALP). These beneficiaries are marginalised girls who live in remote areas un-serviced by government school education, and STAGES is targeting three sub-categories of marginalisation: girls with disabilities, girls who don’t speak the language of instruction and girls from poor households. In addition, STAGES will reach 9815 boys through community-based education, 187,390 girls and 158,942 boys in government schools and 7868 teachers in community-based and government schools. A total of 83,421 community members, and 3636 women and 5001 men participating in school management councils (SMCs) will also benefit from the project.
The overall purpose of the midline evaluation is to compare results from baseline to midline, and assess the extent to which programme outcomes have improved. The evaluation tracks longitudinal cohorts of girls across the life of the project, for learning and transition outcomes. Learning cohorts were sampled at the baseline and midline. Transition cohorts were sampled and tracked at the household level at midline, as an additional arm of enquiry. Read More...

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
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