Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Tigray Rapid Gender Analysis

The Tigray conflict that began in November 2020 has culminated in widespread displacement of people, with some villages completely emptied. The conflict has resulted in the death of thousands of people as well as the displacement of over 417,152 people predominantly women and children. 4.5million people in Tigray are in need of humanitarian assistance. The conflict has also paralyzed the health system and most infrastructure. All of this comes in a context where Ethiopia is facing over 185,641 COVID-19 cases as of March 20, 2021, decreased food production because of a locust infestation, and a year of school closures due to COVID-19.

This Rapid Gender Analysis draws from focus group discussions and individual and key informant interviews with 94 people (67% of whom are women), secondary data sources, and CARE’s research in the region to understand the specific challenges people of all genders are facing. The RGA was conducted in the Northern Amhara region at sites for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Debark and MayTsebri (Formerly under Tigray region). Read More...

Beyond four walls and a roof Reflections on the multi-sectoral One Neighbourhood Approach for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities, Tripoli, Lebanon.

The Syrian Civil War, now in its tenth year, has displaced millions of Syrians, both within Syria and into neighbouring
countries. Over one million Syrian refugees reside in northern Lebanon, including in the city of Tripoli. This large scale
displacement has placed additional strain on housing and services; refugees and vulnerable host communities
frequently reside in informal, poor-quality homes in various states of disrepair that are poorly serviced and often
damp and damaged. With displacement ongoing, many humanitarian programmes seek to meet the needs of both
refugees and address underlying causes of poverty in host communities. These programmes are often multi-sectoral
and have social cohesion as an intended outcome and deliver community-wide protection activities alongside
housing and WASH support.
Programme
With four phases over four years funded by the US Government’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), the ONA programme has worked to improve housing conditions for the most vulnerable whilst enhancing individual and community resilience and social cohesion through protection programming and participatory approaches. In Phase IV (2018-19), CARE International in Lebanon (CIL) aimed to build on Phases I to III. In common with previous phases, for Phase IV, CIL worked in partnership with local partner Akkarouna to provide multi-sectoral Shelter, WASH and Protection assistance to vulnerable Syrian refugees and the Lebanese host community, including Palestinians returning from Syria (PRS) in five neighbourhoods in Tripoli Read More...

‘IF WE DON’ T WORK, WE DON’ T EAT’ Syrian Women Face Mounting Food Insecurity a Decade into the Conflict

Ten years ago, the lives of many Syrians changed profoundly as anti-government demonstrations escalated into violent conflict between forces allied to the Government of Syria and armed opposition groups. The resulting humanitarian crisis is one of the worst of our time – 6.7 million Syrians remain internally displaced; an estimated 13 million people are in need1 and 12.4 million live with food insecurity.

In recent months, the situation has deteriorated even further as the COVID-19 pandemic, mass displacements, natural
disaster, economic collapse and ongoing hostilities have combined to create a situation wherein households are
finding it increasingly difficult to meet their basic needs, including for food.

Average food prices in Syria increased by 236% in 2020 – and food prices are more than 29 times higher than the five year pre-crisis average, causing many families to resort to negative coping strategies. This includes eating fewer
or smaller meals to get by. Furthermore, due to the loss or reduced capacity of male heads of household to death, injury, disappearance or emigration in search of work, many Syrian women are now the sole or primary breadwinners for their families, bearing the full burden of providing for their families with limited livelihood opportunities. About 22% of Syrian households are now headed by women; this is up from only 4% prior to the conflict. Even in households where the male head of household is working in some capacity, dire economic circumstances have pushed women to find some source of income to help with household expenses. In both cases, women are thrust into the ‘provider’ role in a way that most had not previously experienced. Read More...

Our Best Shot: Frontline Health Workers and COVID-19 Vaccines

Fully realizing the social and economic benefits of halting COVID-19 requires investing in a fast and fair global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines. CARE estimates that for every $1 a country or donor government invests in vaccine doses, they need to invest $5.00 in delivering the vaccine.

Investments in frontline health workers are a critical component in this comprehensive vaccination cost. Of the $5.00 in delivery costs, $2.50 has to go to funding, training, equipping, and supporting health workers—especially women—who administer vaccines, run education campaigns, connect communities to health services, and build the trust required for patients to get vaccines. For these investments to work, they must pay, protect and respect women frontline health workers and their rights—a cost that is largely absent from recent WHO estimates on vaccine rollout costs. No current global conversations or guidance on vaccine costs includes the full cost of community health workers or long-term personnel costs.

Investing in a fast and fair global vaccine distribution will save twice as many lives as maximizing vaccine doses for the wealthiest countries in the world. Even better, investing in vaccine equality will speed up economic recoveries in every country in the world. For every $1 invested in vaccines in less wealthy countries, wealthy countries will see $4.80 of economic benefit because economies can fully re-open sooner. Failing to make this investment could cost wealthy economies $4.5 trillion in economic losses.

Current global debates are focused so narrowly on equitable access to for vaccine doses that they largely overlook the importance of delivering vaccines—and the key role women frontline health workers play in vaccine delivery. Of 58 global policy statements on vaccines, only 10 refer to the costs of delivery at all—and these are primarily technical advisories from the World Health Organization. No government donors are discussing the importance of vaccine delivery systems that are necessary to ending COVID-19. Only one statement—from Norway—refers to the importance of women health workers as part of the solution to ending COVID-19.

As new and dangerous strains of COVID-19 emerge in countries that are struggling to access the vaccine and control the pandemic, every day we wait for fair global vaccination allows for more contagious strains that spread around the world. The more chances the virus has to mutate in non-vaccinated populations, the higher the risk for everyone. Comprehensive global vaccine delivery plans that make sure the vaccine gets to people who need it—and that those people are ready to get the vaccine when it arrives—are the only way to end this threat. No one is safe until everyone is safe.
Read More...

Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis for COVID-19 and Tropical Cyclone Harold

When Tropical Cyclone Harold hit on the 2nd April, the Solomon Islands was among the first countries forced to grapple with the complex intersection of COVID-19 and disaster. While the country has managed to contain the spread of COVID-19 and prevent community transmission to date, the pandemic is still having a major impact on everyday life for men, women, boys and girls. Lock-down measures, the abrupt cessation of tourism, severe disruptions to international trade and other flow-on effects of the global pandemic (combined with the effects of TC Harold and pre-existing vulnerabilities) are resulting in widespread income and job losses, heightened stress and tension, increased family violence, displacement, and disrupted access to education, health, and water and sanitation.
If community transmission of COVID-19 occurs, there will be a public health crisis with complex contextual challenges. These include a population dispersed across isolated islands and limited resources, including limited access to quality health services.
The current COVID-19 impacts are disproportionately affecting women, girls and people with disabilities in the Solomon Islands, and this will be exacerbated in the case of a wider COVID-19 outbreak. All humanitarian programming must consider gender roles and responsibilities and the existing patterns of community participation and leadership, in order to ‘do no harm’ and help facilitate a gender and disability inclusive approach to COVID-19 prevention and recovery.

This gender, disability and inclusion analysis has the following objectives:
* To analyse and understand the different impacts that COVID-19 and TC Harold is having on women, men, girls, boys, people living with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in the Solomon Islands;
* To inform humanitarian programming in the Solomon Islands based on the different needs of women, men, boys, girls and people living with disabilities with a particular focus on gender-based violence (GBV) and livelihoods. Read More...

Papua New Guinea COVID-19 RGA

The impacts – direct and indirect – of the COVID-19 pandemic fall disproportionately on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. PNG presents a range of contextual challenges, including difficult geography. Access to quality health services is limited, due to a lack of infrastructure, equipment, and qualified personnel3. Services are easily stretched or overwhelmed, and provision of specialised services and intensive care is limited. In the current situation, this can pose a problem of access to care if the number of infected people increases4. Coupled with gender inequality, which remains pervasive across the Pacific, in particular in the critical domains of leadership and decision making, access to and control of resources and gender-based violence5, the public health response to COVID-19 can become immeasurably more complex. Read More...

DEC Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I & Phase II Final Evaluation Report

Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) has been implementing a 25-month program of DEC-funded Indonesia Tsunami Appeal Phase I and Phase II, running from 1 October 2018 through 31 October 2020. The project aims to help secure livelihoods recovery for the most vulnerable households in Central Sulawesi who were affected by the major earthquake and tsunami in 2018.
In DEC Phase 1, the emergency response was delivered in the sector of WASH and Shelter to support the disaster-affected people. In DEC Phase 2, the recovery period focused in WASH and livelihood programs, particularly for female-headed households. In both phases, YCP was working in collaboration with PKPU/ HI, as local implementing partner. Overall, the DEC provided supports with the amount of about USD 1 million for 25-months project period and reached to more than 28,000 people.
This evaluation is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the project’s achievements, lessons learned, and recommendations for future actions for similar project within YCP. The evaluation focused on research questions that assess criteria in Core Humanitarian Standards: Appropriateness & relevance; Effectiveness; Timeliness; Strengthening of local actors; Communication, participation and feedback; Coordination with and complementarity to other actors; Continuous learning and improvements; Support for staff; and Management of resources, as well as assessing cross cutting Issues, consists of: Gender sensitivity; Social inclusion and; Accountability.
This report is 54 pages long. Read More...

Multiagency and Multisectoral Rapid Need Assessment in Raya Kobo, Raya Alamata, Raya Azebo, Chercher, Wajirat and Ofla Woredas of North Wollo and South Tigray Zones

2020 was ascribed as a record year of disasters by the local communities in the locations covered by this assessment; Raya Kobo, Raya Alamata, Raya Azebo, Raya Chercher, Wajirat and Ofla woredas in North Wollo and South Tigray. The multiple, complex and frequent hazards have proved relentless; COVID 19, Desert Locusts and conflict have exhausted the coping capacity and challenged the resilience of the local communities.
The Tigray conflict erupted at the backdrop of the devastating impact of COVID- 19 and locust infestation crisis. To make the matter worse, the conflict erupted in the middle of the harvest season, effectively halting attempts to gather the remains of already depleted crops. The longer- term effects of, which will impact communities for years to come.
Since there was already an influx of IDPs from the 2017 ethnic conflicts around the country, the region experienced in hosting IDP, but on this occasion, the numbers of incoming families have doubled and, in some cases, trebled, according to reports from the local Woreda authorities responsible for registering such movement. Thus, these two zones are under protracted and complex crisis that have rocked the livelihood base of the communities and put their lives into a very precarious situation.

Objectives of the Assessment
a) Assessing the current humanitarian situation and identify response requirements and preferences1 for IDPs as well as host community members with humanitarian support needs
b) Understand the response capacity and preparedness of partners operating in Amhara and Tigray and to act in a complementary manner to rescue the lives and livelihoods of the
communities and IDPs,
c) To be ready for humanitarian support in line with humanitarian principles and NGOs code of conduct, and
d) Understand current humanitarian concerns of the targeted areas in both regional states
(Amhara and Tigray) and act to raise these concerns with potential benevolent donors within the country and overseas, to generate funds

This report is 43 pages long. Read More...

Multiagency and Multisectoral Rapid Need Assessment in North Gondar and West Tigray Zones Among Conflict Affected IDPs and Host Communities

In its report released a couple of weeks ago, UN urged donor partners and friends of Ethiopia for urgent mobilization of additional resources to address potential new needs as a result of the fighting for the law enforcement, as well as existing needs previously identified in the Humanitarian Response Plan. There are more than 2 million people in need of some type of assistance in Tigray region and thousands of people fleeing from Tigray region to Amhara and Afar regions, having lost everything in the conflict.
As a result of this situation, six international humanitarian agencies including World Vision Ethiopia, CARE, Catholic Relief Service, ActionAid Ethiopia, Oxfam Ethiopia and ORDA agreed to collaborate and carry out joint rapid assessment in most affected woredas of Tigray region and influx affected neighboring woredas of Amhara region. The assessment was organized and carried out in two teams. Team one following the North Wollo and South West Tigray Route (Raya Kobo, Alamata, Raya Azebo and Ofla) and team two following the North Gondar and West Tigray Route (Addi Arikay, Beyada, Janamora and Tselimti). Accordingly, the mission teams have started the assessment on 23rd Dec. 2020 through 3rd Jan 2021. This report is an analysis of the assessment process and findings of team two. This report is 26 pages long. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

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