Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Emergency Assistance and Safe Spaces for Crisis Affected People in Jordan

After the outbreak of the Syrian conflict in 2011, millions of Syrians fled to neighboring countries in search of refuge. Over 668,123 fled to Jordan, of which 8 in 10 are living outside of refugee camps. Since 2011, CARE Jordan has taken a leading role in responding to the needs of this population, conducting annual assessments of the Syrian urban refugee population in Jordan to tailor programming to refugees’ most pressing needs. Building upon these findings, CARE Jordan launched the Emergency Assistance and Safe Spaces for Crisis Affected People in Jordan project with funding from the Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Border protection (DIBP) between July 2016 and July 2018. CARE Jordan partnered with local CBOs to implement the project, which has an overall goal of enhancing socio-economic wellbeing and quality of life for the refugee and host population in Jordan. Specifically, the project aimed to: (1) increase access to sustainability livelihoods for Syrian refugee and host community women; (2) improve the psycho-social coping mechanisms of vulnerable individuals; (3) increase the access of Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian host populations to emergency cash assistance; and (4) increase the access of Syrian refugees and vulnerable host populations to information, case management and protection support. [52 pages] Read More...

‘Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services (ECRHS) Project in Sierra Leone’ Midterm Report

The Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services (ECRHS) project is funded by the German Development Cooperation (KfW) as a direct response to the Ebola outbreak, for the period 1 November 2015 to 31 May 2017. ECRHS reaches 400 communities in the four northern districts of Bombali (100), Tonkilili (110), Kambia (90) and Koinadugu (100), where the Ebola outbreak was prominent. ECRHS also reaches 233 Peripheral Health Units (PHU) located in these districts. [46 pages] Read More...

DEC Supported Emergency Response Project in Amran and Abyan Governorates, Yemen

Under the Yemen Crisis Appeal and with the support from Disasters Emergency Committee, CARE Yemen has been implementing two emergency response projects in Abyan and Amran Governorates of Yemen with the aim of responding to the WASH, food insecurity and Cholera/Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) Crisis. This report provides the findings of the evaluation of the two phases of the DEC funded emergency response projects in Sawyer districts of Amran Governorate, Yemen.
The overall purpose of this evaluation was to ensure accountability and identify lessons learned and best practices so as to feed into and inform the decision making process of the project stakeholders, including the donor, beneficiaries, and government counterparts. In addition, the evaluation aimed to objectively assess the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of the project in light of its objectives and provide recommendations for future programming. Furthermore, the evaluation assessed how the project ensured accountability to affected groups, considering the commitments of the Core Humanitarian Standards, and how the project ensured quality of implementation vis-à-vis emergency response standards such as SPHERE. [72 pages]
Read More...

Integrated Shelter Improvements for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities in Tripoli, Lebanon: Phase II

Final program narrative report for Integrated Shelter Improvements for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities in Tripoli, Lebanon: Phase II. [25 pages] Read More...

Evaluation of Lifesaving Shelter, Protection, and Health Support for South Sudanese Refugees

This evaluation was designed using a mixed method approach, employing systematic review of documents and Most Significant Change (MSC) technique, adapted from Davies and Dart’s most significant change guide to collect change stories at individual, family and community level from 24 project beneficiaries (8 women on SRMCH; 2 males, 6 female PSNs on Shelter; 1 male, 7 females on GBV). The MSC interviews focused on documenting change. Eight (8) Key Informant Interviews were also conducted with the CARE Program, MEAL, and UNHCR OPM staff. Read More...

Integrated Emergency Response Program Baseline

The CARE International in Uganda is implementing three projects through funding from the Australian Development Agency (ADA), Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (NMFA) and Global Affairs Canada (GAC). The NMFA and GAC are being implemented in Rhino Extension, Omugo Settlement while ADA is operating in Imvepi settlement. The projects are designed to address core protection pillars in the refugee programing and emergency response that are in tandem with part of CARE’s priority interventions areas that targets reduction in vulnerability of refugees and host communities, through the promotion of human dignity, increased resilience, and improved protection. [57 pages] Read More...

Evaluation finale du projet RESPECT

Le présent document représente l’évaluation finale du projet RESPECT (« réduire la souffrance des personnes affectées par le conflit transfrontalier dans la région de Diffa »). Dans le chapitre qui suit, il sera question d’une présentation sommaire du contexte et du projet à évaluer, du rappel des objectifs et des questions de l’évaluation, et du plan du présent rapport. [59 pages] Read More...

Post Distribution Monitoring Report: Cash for Non-Food Item Distribution to IDPs

This Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) assessment was carried out by CARE ENSAF project staff on 14 –Sep -2107 in Kabul province. The distribution of Cash for NFI to 28 displaced households was carried out in Aug, 2017 by CARE ENSAF project. The purpose of the PDM was (1) to evaluate the appropriateness, effectiveness and targeting of the distribution to households affected by the displacements form unsecure province , and (2) to provide recommendations for future Cash for NFI response or kind NFI response to humanitarian program management inside CARE. [4 pages] Read More...

Afghanistan Joint Response (AFJR) Project -Post-Assessment Report

The Afghanistan Joint Response “AFJR” project Post-Assessment report is declared to analyze, measure and understand that, how beneficiaries care for their health and have they received any hygiene message from CARE and From which tactics they use to hide the waste from their environment. This assessment revealed the project beneficiaries have benefited from Cash for Work, Unconditional Cash & Winterization Package intervention received from CARE. In addition, the assessment will elaborated the assistance causes positive changes and have impact in lives of the affected people, to know that have they taken any step take care of diseases or not, do they have information about health related issues or not? Read More...

Quenching the Thirst Baseline

CARE and its principal partner, the Ministry of Water Resources (MoWR) in Somaliland, have just concluded implementation of a 30-month project titled Haraad Reeb, which was funded by BMZ – Germany Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The thrust of the project was to build the resilience of target communities against drought-related shocks. The project focused on rural semi-sedentary populations living in small village-towns and spread across the eastern regions – Togdheer, Sool and Sanaag. Some activities were also implemented in Sahil, Hargeisa and Awdal regions.
The project performance against set indicators was excellent; indictors were met or surpassed. Implementation effectiveness was evident in the wide coverage, beneficiary participation, gender considerations, coordination mechanism, and in monitoring and evaluation strategies. CARE-MoWR had a robust working relationship, outlined in a joint MoU and applied at all levels – national, regional, districts and village. CARE had sufficient, qualified and motivated project staff while MoWR attached an engineer to the project.
Backed by evidence, the project designers realized that insufficiency of investments is not the core problem facing the rural water supply subsector. The core problem was identified as poor strategies to support operation and maintenance of the established systems. Due to this problem, there has been little to show for millions of dollars that the INGOs and UN agencies have invested in the subsector over the last two decades (1995-2015).
At the policy level, the project addressed the institutional lacuna that has existed regarding community management of water systems. This was done by supporting the MoWR to develop the community water management manual. The evaluation found that the manual is a great step forward. However, it also found that the manual requires review, consensus, reediting and advocacy with a view to giving it a national appeal, acceptance and application. In particular, the proposed 3-person management unit is too restrictive and not adequate for inclusive and participatory regime. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all