Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

Jarablus Needs Overview

Since January 2020, Syria's economic future is increasingly becoming uncertain. Regional actors and local commmunities, who were previously acting as an economic bridge to the outside world, are facing their own economic turmoil and leaving Syria isolated with unprecedent depreciation of the Syrian Pound. The interlinked nature of Syria’s politics, economy and infrastructure are now forcing citizens to choose between the uncertainty of a pandemic or reality of household deprivation at the confluence of the conflict, economic crisis and COVID-19 pandemic.

This infographic aims to present an overview of the needs in Jarablus through an internal analysis of data collected by
Humanitarian Needs Assessment Programme during the months of July and August 2020. Read More...

2nd RAPID ANALYSIS How are female garment factory workers during COVID-19

CARE Bangladesh has conducted the mobile based 1st Rapid Analysis in April’20 to understand COVID-19 impacts on lives and livelihoods of female factory workers. That study reveals, 25% doesn’t know protection measures, 35% feels uncertain about salary, 35% faced food shortage, 28% were getting fear to loose job and 91% were suffering from anxiety. 2nd Rapid Analysis is a follow-up survey on the same target group keeping the same objective, looking into more deep-dive issues. Read More...

A RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS OF THE AUGUST 2020 BEIRUT PORT EXPLOSION

On August 4 2020, the devastating Beirut explosion shook the whole city to its core, taking the lives of 191 persons (120 males, 58 females, and 13 unspecified), wounding at least 6,500, and leaving 300,000 people displaced. Prior to the explosion, Lebanon’s crisis has been underpinned by extreme structural gender inequalities: Lebanon ranks 145 out of 153 countries in the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report, due to low rates of women’s economic and political participation and patriarchal socio-cultural norms. The impact of the explosion compounded with the worst economic crisis in the history of Lebanon and the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to significantly push back what gains have been made on gender equality in the country.
This joint rapid gender analysis (RGA) of the Beirut port explosion assesses how diverse women, men, girls, boys, and gender minorities were affected by the events of August 4, with a close look at the specific impact on older, disabled, refugee, migrant, and LBQT (lesbian, bisexual, queer, and trans) women.
The assessment combined a secondary review of existing data with primary data collection. Secondary analysis included reviewing 45 reports, sit-reps, and needs assessments published by United Nations (UN) agencies, international and non-governmental organizations (I/NGOs) since the explosion and conducting gender analysis on three quantitative datasets from assessments carried out in response to the explosion. Primary data consisted of 16 key informant interviews (KIIs), 4 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 17 participants, and 16 community interviews – a total of 49 people overall.
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CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Northeast Nigeria – Borno

Borno is a state in northeast Nigeria. Borno has been the epicentre of the Organized A since it began its insurgency in 2009. Records of Boko Haram operations show that thousands of people have either been murdered or kidnapped as a result of the group’s activities from July 27, 2009, through late 2019.
For Borno, COVID-19 is a “crisis within a crisis” and presents a range of challenges in a context with limited resources. In most localities (named local government areas or LGAs), access to quality health services, including intensive care, is limited. Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) e.g. malaria, water borne illnesses (including cholera) and malnutrition represent the main cause of premature mortality in the state. In addition, food security and livelihoods are particularly precarious due to semi-subsistence lifestyles and heavy dependence on the informal sector for income.
Because Borno has been in a protracted crisis since 2009, gender has been a key consideration in the response. However, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Borno continues to disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways, as women are more likely to stay home to help with the increased domestic tasks. With the fear of contracting COVID-19, permission granted by men to access health services is decreasing which is negatively affecting women and girls’ access to maternal, sexual and reproductive health services. In addition, Gender Based Violence (GBV) service providers in Borno have reported a heightened risk of increased domestic violence in areas where pre-existing rates of violence against women in IDP camps are already very high. Additionally, with the recent loss of livelihoods, strained humanitarian interventions and inadequate field feedback handling mechanisms, Prevention of Sexual Harassment Exploitation and Abuse (PSHEA) and mitigation is a pressing concern as people in need are left vulnerable in the face of insufficient food and resources. Read More...

AN INTERSECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF GENDER AMONGST ROHINGYA REFUGEES AND HOST COMMUNITIES IN COX’S BAZAR

The Rohingya ethnic minority population in Myanmar have been persecuted over generations and are denied of their fundamental human rights. Violence, discrimination and persecution in Myanmar have eventually led the stateless Rohingya people to flee
to Bangladesh from Rakhine State in successive waves over the last four decades. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, reaching the total number of 914,998 people and constituting the largest refugee camp
in the world. The rapid and sizable influx of Rohingya refugees now outnumbers locals nearly three to one in the two sub-districts, Ukhiya and Teknaf, where refugees and the subsequent humanitarian response have had an impact on the host community.
This inter-agency research is commissioned by ActionAid in collaboration with UNHCR and CARE Bangladesh to investigate how age, gender and diversity issues are addressed in the humanitarian response amongst Rohingya refugees and the host communities. The
quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 03 December 2019 to 07 January 2020. This transdisciplinary research aims to fill a significant gap by providing a critical analysis of the present status of gender relations addressed in humanitarian response, taking into consideration the intersectionality among specific needs based on age, gender and other diversity factors contributing to a person or group’s vulnerability.
This study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the change in context, it has now become even more imperative to adapt existing mechanisms within the ongoing response, especially the need for increased Age, Gender and Diversity (AGD) analysis and monitoring of vulnerabilities. While COVID-19 was not a factor in this report, the recommendations of this report need to be addressed and implemented with the changing context in mind. Read More...

IN THE SHADOWS OF THE PANDEMIC: THE GENDERED IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON ROHINGYA AND HOST COMMUNITIES

Since the onset of global COVID-19 pandemic in December, Bangladesh has been in a state of high alert. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Bangladesh was recorded on 8 March 2020. By 26 March, containment measures were implemented, impacting an already vulnerable population. As of 13 September there have been 337,520 total cases, with 4,401 in Cox’s Bazar and 179 across all 34 refugee camps. However, it is highly likely that these low case numbers are more indicative of negligible testing than of the actual
spread of the virus; the true incidence of the disease is unknown. COVID-19 and the accompanying containment measures have had a significant impact on women, girls, men and boys, including female sex workers, transgender persons and people with disabilities,
across all camps, exacerbating existing conditions, such as overcrowding, movement across hilly terrain, uneven access to a limited number of WASH and health facilities and inadequate access to protection and hygiene resources. This has hindered the ability of refugees to take the necessary preventive measures to limit infections. The host community faces similar difficulties, and, moreover, the containment measures had an adverse economic impact on both host and refugee communities.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) builds on the secondary data analysis done in May 2020 by the Gender Hub, UN Women, CARE and OXFAM. This RGA aims to answer the following research questions:
􀁹 How has COVID-19 impacted women, girls, men and boys and key vulnerable and marginalised groups’ ability to meet their basic needs and entitlements?
􀁹 What achievements made on gender equality and the empowerment of women, girls and LGBTQ+ groups are now at risk of being undone by COVID-19?
􀁹 What new or heightened protection and safety risks are arising from COVID-19?
􀁹 How can women, girls, men and boys, and key vulnerable and marginalised groups articipate and lead in the COVID-19 response?
The research was conducted using primary data collected in Rohingya and host communities in Cox’s Bazar between 15 June and 9 July 2020 to understand the impact COVID-19 has had on age, gender and other social characteristics, and to analyse how the socio-cultural context helps or hinders people’s ability to cope with the crisis. The purpose is to generate evidence to support the design of gender-responsive intervention/strategies for the COVID-19 response in Cox’s Bazar that can be used for advocacy and fundraising purposes. Read More...

Unconditional Cash Grant (UCG) Post Distribution Monitoring Report

In response to dire need of women headed household in Kabul whose economy was severely impacted  by the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting continued lockdown, CARE Afghanistan implemented an  emergency response project. Due to the weak health system and limited capacity to deal with major disease outbreaks, communities in different part of country was significantly affected both directly from the COVID-19 and resulting socio-economic impacts. In addition to weak health system, poverty, limited job opportunity, people reliance on daily work, retailing combined with political turmoil putting pressure on the country’s capacity to effectively provide inclusive response and required coordination and response. CARE over three months’ period - officially started in 01st May ending July 31, 2020 implemented an Emergency Response Fund (ERF) project through which provided livelihood cash based response and as well as COVID-19 Health response through scale up existing health project implemented in Kabul. The health response involved provision of hygiene/antiseptic kits to the 1700 most vulnerable HHs and 150 PPE to health center; provision of un-conditional cash grant to the 525 most vulnerable women headed households of Kabul Women Association (KWA) member to help them cover Health and/or livelihoods needs during quarantine period and provision of health and hygiene awareness to the target population most vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreak. Read More...

Haiti COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

Suite à la propagation de la pandémie de la COVID-19 en Haïti qui a fait, jusqu’au 11 juillet 2020, 6727 cas de contamination et 139 morts, la population haïtienne, comme cela se passe au niveau mondial, est en train de subir les diverses conséquences de cette crise.
Certainement, celles-ci ne sont pas les mêmes partout dans le monde.
Elles changent avec la réalité socioéconomique des pays. Les retombées de cette crise sont de nature sanitaire, économique, psychologique et sociale. Cependant, les hommes et les femmes et les différentes catégories sociales ne sont pas affectés au même degré, selon leur niveau de vie, leur habilité (physique et mentale), leur orientation sexuelle et probablement d’autres facteurs qui ne sont pas pris en compte dans le cadre de l’enquête. L’Analyse Rapide Genre (ARG) vise à fournir des données et preuves sur les besoins
différenciés des femmes et des hommes par rapport à l'impact de la COVID-19 sur la vie des deux sexes en Haïti, en particulier les femmes qui représentent un groupe vulnérable et font face à de multiples discriminations. Cette démarche permettra de développer advantage des efforts sensibles au genre visant la prévention de la propagation de la COVID-19 par toutes les parties prenantes au niveau national, régional et local. En ce sens, l’ARG prend fondamentalement en compte les inégalités entre les sexes, les inégalités socioéconomiques, et tout ce qui peut engendrer des différences dans la manière dont les groupes sociaux sont affectés par la crise de la COVID-19. L’enquête qui conduit à cette analyse a été réalisée sur les dix départements géographiques du pays. Read More...

Nigeria VSLA COVID-19 Survey September 2020

CARE is working with women in savings groups to better understand their needs in COVID-19 and how they are already leading and adapting to cope with the crisis. This is the first of 3 planned rounds of data collection to better understand how women's needs are evolving during the crisis. The findings in this survey are informing CARE's programming for VSLAs in Nigeria and globally. Read More...

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