Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Rapid Gender Analysis Tropical Cyclone Winston

Women, men, boys and girls, and minority groups, will experience differing immediate and longer term impacts from Tropical Cyclone Winston. This Rapid Gender Analysis is intended to ensure these differing needs and priorities are taken into account in order to deliver an effective response that meets everyone’s needs. The analysis begins with an outline of gender equality and women’s empowerment in Fiji based principally on secondary data.

The objectives of this Rapid Gender Analysis are:
1. To inform Live and Learn-CARE's programming based on the different needs of women,
men, boys, and girls of different groups including people with disabilities; and
2. To support the Safety and Protection cluster in advocating for protection-integrated
programming throughout Fiji. Read More...

FROM THE GROUND UP: GENDER AND CONFLICT ANALYSIS IN YEMEN

Gender relations in Yemen are shaped by diverse religious, cultural, social and political traditions. Due to deep-rooted socio-cultural and economic inequalities at home and in their wider community, conflicts affect men, women, girls, and boys differently. Men and boys make up the vast majority of direct victims of armed conflict, forced recruitment and arbitrary detention, while women and girls – who in normal times bear the burden of running the households and are exposed to different forms of gender-based violence (GBV) – become more vulnerable during emergencies.

The thematic scope of the assessment covered four gender-specific domains, including a) gender roles and relations, b) capacities and vulnerabilities, c) participation in decision making (at community and intra-household levels), and d) access to services and assistance. The report concludes with guidance on how to implement humanitarian response and longer-term programming in a way that better supports women’s and men’s, boys’ and girls’ different needs. Read More...

Pacific COVID 19 RGA March 26 2020

Novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is having devastating impacts globally. As of 26th March, 414,179 confirmed cases and 18,440 deaths have been recorded across 178 countries. To date, the Pacific has confirmed cases in Guam, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Fiji, PNG, and suspected cases in Samoa. In most Pacific countries, access to quality health services including intensive care is limited. Food security and livelihoods are particularly vulnerable to shocks due to semi subsistence lifestyles and a high reliance on the informal sector for income.

A COVID-19 outbreak in the Pacific could disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways including adverse impacts to their education, food security and nutrition, health, livelihoods, and protection. Women are the primary care givers in the family and are key health care front line responders placing them at increased risk and exposure to infection. Maternal and sexual reproductive health needs continue in an emergency but risk being de-prioritized. COVID-19 risks increasing women’s workloads, caring for children as schools close and the sick. Additionally, there is a risk of increased family violence in a region where pre-existing rates of violence against women are already very high.

Men's gender roles and norms need to be taken into account in order to ensure that men are properly targeted to help reduce their vulnerability to illness and to leverage their roles as leaders and decision makers in the home and in the community to help prevent the spread of the disease. Read More...

Australia COVID19 RGA April 1 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a healthcare crisis but is having far-reaching impacts on the economy and the social fabric of countries. Australia is no different. While the proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, various groups are impacted differently. Women and people with disabilities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who have poorer health outcomes are at a higher risk of infection. Barriers in accessing information and medical and other health services exacerbate this higher risk. Women make up almost 80 per cent of the health and social assistance industry, and this means more women than men will be on the frontline of the response to COVID-19, putting them at higher risk of exposure.
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the Australian economy, with the Australian Government estimating one million people could be made unemployed. The impact on the economy is compounded by the destruction of local businesses and homes during the recent bushfire season. Four-fifths of employed Australians (80 per cent) work in industries providing services, such as health care, education, and retail. These sectors are the hardest hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19. Many part-time and casual workers, of which women comprise the majority, are most likely to be laid off or given shorter hours during the crisis and post-crisis. Unpaid caring labour falls more heavily on women because of the existing structure of the workforce and gendered social norms. Women are paid less and perceived to have more flexibility from doing casual or part-time jobs. As a result, women will be expected to undertake unpaid care work. Read More...

COVID Needs Assessment Urban Areas and Azraq Camp

The overall aim of this rapid needs assessment is to better understand the impact of both COVID-19 and the containment measures and restrictions implemented by the Government of Jordan on CARE Jordan’s beneficiaries, which include the elderly, pregnant and lactating women, people with disabilities (PwDs) and households with serious health risks and needs. Read More...

Global COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis April 1

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation classified COVID-19 as a pandemic.1 Disease outbreaks affect women, girls, men, boys, and persons of all genders differently, to say nothing of the wide variety of at-risk and marginalised groups. The compounding complexities of development and humanitarian contexts can have disproportionate effects on women and girls, as well as those at-risk and vulnerable groups. CARE International identified the need to highlight the gender and intersectional impacts of the COVID-19 crisis.
To achieve this, CARE first developed a policy brief to review lessons learned from previous public health emergencies. CARE then adapted its Rapid Gender Analysis toolkit to develop the Global Rapid Gender Analysis on COVID-19, conducted in consultation with the International Rescue Committee (IRC). This report is for humanitarians working in fragile contexts that are likely to be affected by the COVID-19 crisis. It is organised around broad themes and areas of focus of particular importance to those whose programming advances gender equality and reduces gender inequalities. It seeks to deepen the current gender analysis available by encompassing learning from global gender data available for the COVID-19 public health emergency. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis North West Syria (Idleb and Aleppo)

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) focused on gendered work practices and attitudes, access to services, protection and coping mechanisms. Past research indicated that the role of women has been further marginalised during the protracted conflict and there was gap in information around gender dynamics, trends, roles and responsibilities and power dynamics in Idleb. Understanding these trends and patterns helps to inform program activities and procedures, including how to better target women and girls in ways that are safe, equitable, and empowering within the local context. Information about effective male engagement is also required to understand what actions and processes are useful to help reinforce the work of supporting women, elderly women and men and adolescent women and men during the protracted crisis.
The RGA focused on the Aleppo and Idleb Governorates in North West Syria. The objectives are focused on capturing the approach that has worked in reaching and supporting vulnerable women and men of different ages under the Water, Sanitation and Health (WASH), shelter, rapid response, cash for work / livelihoods and protection sectors; analyse the level, type and extent of changes that have occurred and are taking place as a result of conflict and displacement at household and community levels in relation to gender and power differentials (structure, relations and agency) and the reasons / factors behind those changes,; review the functionality of formal or informal support structures established for Gender Based Violence (GBV) survivors of any age and to develop a set of actionable recommendations, short and medium-term, based on key findings. Read More...

RAPPORT EVALUATION FINALE INTERNE. PROJET RAPPORT EVALUATION FINALE INTERNE. PROJET SOUTENIR LA RELANCE ECONOMIQUEET RENFORCER LA SECURITE ALIMENTAIRE DANS LES MENAGES VICTIMES DE LA CRISE DES GROUPES ARMES DANS LA PROVINCE DU LAC TCHAD. ERSFS

Le projet « Soutenir la relance économique et renforcer la sécurité alimentaire dans les ménages victimes de la crise des groupes armés dans la Province du lac Tchad (ERSFS) » a été mis en œuvre dans la province du Lac Tchad, département de FOULI, MAMDI et KAYA. Il a été entièrement financé par le gouvernement Tchèque. Cette évaluation finale interne révèle les éléments suivants les principaux critères de l’évaluation que sont : sa pertinence, son efficience, son efficacité, ses impacts et sa durabilité.

Impacts
• 82% des ménages appuyés ont amélioré leur score de consommation alimentaire suite à l’action ;
• 100 bénéficiaires sont formés sur les risques liées à la migration en Europe
• 375 femmes appuyées par le projet développent des Activités Génératrices de Revenus (AGR) ;
• 250 ménages ont bénéficié de cash pendant la période de soudure (juillet, aout et septembre) pour un montant total de 45000 XAF soit 15000 XAF par ménage et par mois.
• Un montant total de 11.250.000 XAF a été injecté en cash pour favoriser l’accès aux marchés en faveur de ménages pauvres pendant la période de soudure ;
• 77% des ménages touchés par le projet ont pu satisfaire leur besoin alimentaire grâce au cash reçu ;
• La durée des stocks de denrées de première nécessité détenus par les ménages pour leur propre consommation a augmenté de 4 mois ;
• 200 ménages ont été appuyés à reconstituer leur cheptel animal avec 600 sujets soit 3 petits ruminants pour un ménage. Un montant total de 10.500.000 XAF a été injecté pour l’acquisition de ruminants pendant cette foire ;
Read More...

Gender Analysis: Prevention and Response to Ebola Virus Disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo

The latest epidemic of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has rapidly evolved into the second largest outbreak in history. Deployed in an operational environment characterised by ongoing volatility, EVD prevention, treatment and containment efforts have faced multiple difficulties. Mistrust of EVD responders by local communities, coupled with targeted attacks on healthcare workers and facilities, have proved to be serious operational challenges. Despite a gressive efforts to stamp out the disease across three provinces, the virus has continued to spread and is responsible for the deaths of 3,303 people to date (as of 24th November 2019) with an overall fatality rate of 67%.

However, these casualty numbers hide the underlying characteristics of the EVD crisis. The reality is that the majority of fatalities consist of women (56%), and children (28%). Adult men constitute just 11% of EVD deaths. Yet fatalities alone do not fully demonstrate the differential ways in which men, women, boys and girls are exposed and experience the immediate risks and longer-term consequences of the disease. Socially prescribed cultural norms, attitudes and practices in relation to gender and age dictate how individual women, men, girls and boys are differentially impacted by the EVD crisis. It is therefore critical to better understand the socio-behavioural underpinnings to EVD aetiology. In light of the gendered dimensions of the EVD crisis, CARE International in DRC commissioned a Gender Analysis of the EVD crisis in North Kivu in order to provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys during the EVD crisis. Read More...

KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PRACTICE SURVEY SOUTH EAST TURKEY

CARE International in Turkey began responding to the needs of Syrian refugees in Southern Turkey in October 2014. As of 27 November 2019, Turkey hosts 3,691,333 Syrian registered refugees, accounting for around 5% of total resident population in Turkey and over 365,000 refugees of other origins. Of that total, around 45.8% are females, with 21.4% of those female refugees are below the age of 18. A total of 62,216 individuals are hosted in 7 camps.

The impact of the now nine-year old conflict on Turkey’s economy, livelihoods, public infrastructure and services have been so profound that it is starting to affect inter-community cohesion. Off-camp refugees face several challenges linked to their ability to meet basic needs and are especially vulnerable to protection risks, forced to resort to negative coping mechanisms such as early marriage, child labour and reduction of meals since their original displacement.

CARE's experience in South East Turkey illustrated numerous gaps in access to services (education, health, legal), financial security, protection risks (child labour, sexual and GBV) and access to sufficient current information for the refugee population. Building on this CARE’s prior experience, we embarked on the Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) Survey to provide additional context and aims to understand the changes in the community as a result of CARE’s protection programming.

The overall purpose of the KAP/base-line assessment is to provide valid reliable information focusing on Syrian refugees’ knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and behaviors related to some crucial topics such as; child/early/forced marriage; gender-based violence; child protection; information and access to services and sexual and reproductive health. Read More...

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