Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Rapid Gender and Protection Analysis Cyclone Kenneth Response Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique

On 25 April 2019, as Mozambique was responding to the devastation caused by Cyclone Idai five weeks previously, Tropical Cyclone Kenneth hit the northern part of the country causing widespread devastation, flooding and displacement.
In a part of Mozambique experiencing significant poverty and instability caused by complex conflict dynamics1, women, men, boys and girls in the province of Cabo Delgado had limited resilience to withstand the shock of a cyclone. Early reports indicated that certain groups were hit particularly hard, including female-headed households, pregnant and lactating women, people with disabilities, the elderly, and boys and girls. This was confirmed by the Rapid Gender and Protection Analysis (RGPA).
COSACA,2 a consortium comprised of CARE International, Oxfam and Save the Children, identified four districts of the Cabo Delgado province to focus its analysis based on ongoing and planned operations: Ibo, Quissanga, Macomia and Metuge Districts as well as Pemba Town. The RGPA was built up progressively over the data collection period through 39 focus group discussions (FGD), 34 key informant interviews (KII) and observational safety audits.
Mozambique has the thirteenth highest level of women’s participation in parliament in the world yet, at the same time, a third of women report experiencing violence, reflecting entrenched gender inequalities within society.3 These inequalities contribute to women and girls appearing to be the worst-affected by Cyclone Kenneth, subject to greater food insecurity and increased risk of gender-based violence. This is in line with global evidence on the disproportionate, gendered impact of disasters and conflict.4 Humanitarian responders must account for the different experience of crisis felt by women, men, boys and girls, and ensure actions are tailored accordingly. Moreover, those responsible for recovery programming should use the opportunity to address inequalities and transform harmful gender norms where possible. Read More...

Endline Assessment for Multi-Sectoral Assistance to South Sudanese Refugees and Ugandan Host Communities in Bidibidi, Palorinya and Rhino Camp

Mercy Corps and its consortium partners Save the Children (SCI), CARE, Oxfam, and DanChurchAid (DCA) implemented the 21-month “Multi Sectoral Assistance to South Sudanese Refugees and Host Communities in West Nile (Bidibidi, Palorinya and Rhino Camp Settlements)” from May 2017 to February 2019, funded by European Union Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO). The project delivered life-saving and protection assistance to vulnerable South Sudanese refugees and host communities in Bidibidi (Yumbe), Palorinya (Moyo) and Rhino Camp (Arua) settlements through 1) General and child protection; 2) Water and sanitation infrastructure and hygiene promotion; 3) Livelihoods and cash-based interventions; and 4) Market development, financial services and enhanced coordination. Specifically, the project aimed to increase resilience of South Sudanese refugees and host communities while promoting peaceful coexistence between and among the target groups. Read More...

EVALUATION OF LIFESAVING SHELTER, PROTECTION AND HEALTH SUPPORT FOR SOUTH SUDANESE REFUGEES IN UGANDA Rhino extension – Omugo, Arua District

CARE international in Uganda has been implementing a project on “Lifesaving Shelter, Protection and Health Support for South Sudanese Refugees in Uganda” between July 2017 and March 2018. The grant was awarded by the department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD), International Humanitarian Assistance Division, through Global Affairs Canada (GAC). The GAC project was implemented in Rhino camp extension, Omugo, with a total project cost of 750,000 Canadian Dollars. The ultimate aim of the intervention was to save lives, reduce suffering, and maintain human dignity of refugees and the host communities in the Rhino settlement expansion site, with focus on the three thematic areas;
1) Increased access to appropriate, safe and dignified emergency temporary shelters for South Sudanese refugees, especially women, children and persons with special needs (PSNs) in Rhino Settlement Expansion Site;
2) Increased protection from GBV and sexual exploitation and abuse for refugees & host communities, particularly women and girls in Rhino Settlement Expansion Site; and
3) Increased access to critical SRMCH services for newly arrived refugee Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW) to Rhino Settlement Expansion Site.
The project was designed to reach a total of 26,400 beneficiaries, 15,840 (60%) of whom are women and girls. Persons with Special Needs (PSNs) were a core target under this intervention, as well as women and girls, including Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW). The majority of direct beneficiaries were South Sudanese refugees, with activities such as training and awareness raising also benefiting members of the host population. Read More...

Inter-agency Rapid Gender Analysis and GBV Assessment – DRC Refugee Influx, Uganda

Overstretched and underfunded, the humanitarian response for the influx of DRC refugees into Uganda is struggling to meet the large basic needs. This Inter-Agency Rapid Gender Analysis and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) assessment was conducted with the objective of understanding the gender dimensions of the crisis, and needs and vulnerabilities of the refugees in order to inform a more gender responsive humanitarian response. In particular, it aimed to identify the specific GBV risks and vulnerabilities facing the affected population, and provide targeted recommendations to both CARE and other humanitarian actors on how to address these gaps and vulnerabilities.
GBV is a daily reality in Eastern DRC – both within and outside of the ongoing conflicts. Sexual violence has been a longstanding weapon of war used by parties to the conflicts and, increasingly, this sexual violence has extended through to every-day perpetration by civilians. This violence is situated within a society with deeply rooted discriminatory gender norms, in which women suffer entrenched inequality in all spheres of life and where a man’s worth is largely based on his capacity to provide for and protect his family. The sustained conflicts within the country have resulted in decreasing opportunities for men to perform this role, similarly so in displacement in Uganda, where livelihood opportunities are severely diminished.
This assessment found that in conflict, in transit, and in displacement in Uganda, the Congolese refugee population is facing numerous highly traumatic forms of human rights abuses, including various forms of GBV. In the conflict in DRC, sexual violence is systematically perpetrated against women and girls; and kidnapping, physical assault, torture and massacres are used against men and boys. Women and girls often face a compounded risk of additional sexual violence during flight. Read More...

Key findings from CARE’s rapid gender analysis in Rhino and Imvepi settlements, March 2017

CARE has conducted a rapid gender analysis (RGA) during the week of 12th March 2017 in Rhino and the newly opened Imvepi settlements in the Arua district of the West Nile region of Uganda. The following are a set of initial findings pulled out of the analysis to support engagement with ECHO regarding potential work in the West Nile region.

Methodology: RGA can provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis by examining the experiences and relationships between women, men, boys and girls. However, an RGA should be built up progressively, and therefore the forthcoming report will provide an initial but incomplete insight into the gendered situation within the South Sudanese refugee community in West Nile. Read More...

INCREASING PROTECTION OF REFUGEE WOMEN AND GIRLS PROJECT IN UGANDA’S WEST NILE IMVEPI SETTLEMENT, ARUA DISTRICT

With funding from Danish Telethon (DT), CARE International in Uganda has been implementing a project titled: Increasing Protection of Refugee Women and Girls in Uganda’s West Nile Region in Imvepi settlement and affected host community members in Zone 2. The Project was implemented over ten (10) months.
Project Goal: To increase the protection and confidence of South Sudanese refugee women and girls fleeing to Uganda by reducing their vulnerability and that of the host communities. In particular, the project targets Persons with Specific Needs (PSNs), women and girls, through the promotion of human dignity, increased resilience, and improved protection. Read More...

Lifesaving Shelter, Protection and Livelihoods for South Sudanese Refugees in Omugo Zone, Rhino Settlement, Arua District, West Nile Region in Uganda

CARE International in Uganda conducted a baseline study to establish the pre-intervention situation primarily on Shelter, Protection and Livelihoods for South Sudanese Refugees and host community in Omugo Zone, Rhino Camp. This baseline findings will inform project implementation approaches/strategies and decisions and provide benchmarks for assessing results and impacts of the project at the end. A quick baseline assessment carried out by CARE and partners in February 2019 identified that Omugo is still one of the areas with needs and requires immediate support. CARE is already operational in Omugo thus allowing for the necessary rapid scale-up and complementary coverage that NMFA2 funding will provide under CARE’s integrated humanitarian response program. On May 16, 2019, the UNHCR officially confirmed partners, including CARE to consider scaling up provision of semi-permanent shelters for Persons with Special Needs (PSNs) and introduction of livelihoods to address negative coping strategies by refugee girls, women and host community youth.
The objective of the Baseline survey for the NMFA2 project The objective was to generate baseline data and assess the status quo regarding access to shelter, reported or perceived protection from GBV, sexual exploitation and abuse and coverage of Livelihood interventions. Data was collected from 371 refugees and the report focuses at three thematic areas, to be implemented under the NMFA project – Lifesaving shelter, protection form GBV, sexual exploitation and abuse and Livelihood component targeting the general project beneficiary population. Read More...

Endline Integrated Emergency Response Impevi Settlement Uganda

The end line evaluation was conducted in all the intervention areas where the ADA project was implemented. Respondents were sampled from the ten villages of Zone 3 of Imvepi settlement in Arua District. Data collection was conducted between 10th to 14th December 2018 starting with a two-day training for enumerators.
The evaluation relied on data collected by CARE International MEAL Team. This was quantitative and qualitative data. For Quantitative data, Semi-structured interviews were conducted at the household level using Handheld Tablets, programmed with Kobo tool.
The objective was to assess self-reported access to shelter, reported or perceived protection from GBV and sexual exploitation and to measure coverage in access to Livelihood interventions.
Data was collected from 304 refugees and 79 host community members. For the usability of data and a gendered comparison across life stages, the report only presents findings from the refugee’s population. The report focuses on three thematic areas, implemented under the ADA project – Lifesaving shelter for PSNs, Livelihood for the youths and Sexual gender-based component targeting the general project beneficiary population. Read More...

Dutch Relief Alliance Horn of Africa Joint Response in Ethiopia and Somalia/Somaliland

This evaluation assesses the impact of the Dutch Relief Alliance’s (DRA) multi-sectoral Horn of Africa (HoA) joint response implemented in Somaliland and Ethiopia from April to December 2018. The five project components, i.e. Food security and livelihood (FSL); Livestock and agriculture; Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); Health; and Nutrition, were assessed against a set of key evaluation criteria including relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, sustainability, impact, localization, accountability, gender mainstreaming, and coordination.
In addition to an in-depth desk review of the DRA HoA joint response documentation to examine quantifiable targets and progress, the evaluation was conducted through qualitative and quantitative data collection in four different project locations in four different regions. In order to provide variety of geography, context, implementing partners, and project components, Bulale (Jarar), Kabri Dahar (Korahe), Ainabo (Sool), and Lughaya (Awdal) were selected. A total of 29 key informant interviews and eight focus group discussions targeting 72 beneficiaries were conducted. A quantitative
household survey collected data from 428 beneficiaries across all four locations.
Based on findings in this report, the DRA’s greatest strength lies in its coordination and flexibility between implementing partners and ability to adapt to changing local contexts. This was seen across multiple project locations when dealing with insecurity in the Somali region of Ethiopia and Sanaag region of Somaliland or changing project activities in Awdal region after the cyclone in May severely impacted the local situation. Partners also felt the CARE focal point was extremely communicative and responsive and that decisions could be approved at higher levels within a few hours, which was particularly relevant for an emergency response program when response time is crucial. The DRA was
effective in incorporating localization measures into their program designs as well. While many of the partners have had established field offices in the target locations for many years, in some cases program activities were implemented through local NGOs who have an in-depth understand of the local context and well-established relationship with the communities they work in.
Read More...

Cash support for vulnerable families affected by the Mosul Crisis

Recent crises and armed conflict resulted in destruction of productive assets, poverty, diminished livelihoods and incomes and dysfunctional infrastructure, particularly in West Mosul that was the epicenter of the IS conflict. With an overall objective to reduce vulnerability and strengthen the resilience of conflict affected households in Iraq, unconditional cash assistance was applied by the German Foreign Funding Office (GFFO) supported project to meet the beneficiary’s needs running from 15th January through 31st December 2018. The project reached a total of 1,075 families (6,403 individuals) through 6 rounds of un-conditional, multi-purpose cash transfers delivered to residents of Al-Shifaa, Al-Iqtsadein and 17 Al-Tammuz Neighborhoods in West Mosul.
In coordination with the local government in West Mosul, the Cash Working Group (CWG) and development actors in Mosul, CARE conducted a Rapid Needs Assessment (RNA) in Al-Iqtsadein and Al- Shifaa neighborhood on 12th March 2018. Following the project extension and budget top-up later in August 2018, the project expanded to now cover vulnerable families in 17 Al-Tamuz neighborhood in West Mosul. The neighborhood had unmet needs with no other humanitarian agency implementing cash projects. Using the socio-economic vulnerability criteria developed by the CWG (see Annex 1), CARE conducted a vulnerability assessment from 12-18th March 2018, interviewing 666 households. From this figure 294 eligible households in 17 Al-Tamuz neighborhood were supported with multipurpose cash. Read More...

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