Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

PROYECTO: RESPONDER A LAS NECESIDADES INMEDIATAS DE LOS MIGRANTES / REFUGIADOS DE VENEZUELA EN EL CONTEXTO DEL COVID-19

El impacto del Covid-19 en las condiciones de vida de las y los venezolanos no está siendo atendido por el gobierno, por ello organismos humanitarios y el ACNUR han hecho un llamado a atender las necesidades más urgentes de esta población. Save the Children, World Vision (WV), CARE y Acción contra el Hambre (ACF) ya están sobre el terreno prestando asistencia a los migrantes peruanos y venezolanos en materia de protección, alojamiento, abastecimiento de agua y saneamiento y transferencia de efectivo, y están coordinando actualmente con las autoridades gubernamentales para garantizar la coordinación y la complementariedad de las medidas.
Las condiciones de vida de las y los migrantes venezolanos han empeorado en el actual contexto de pandemia. Las evaluaciones realizadas por los organismos asociados muestran que la mayoría de las familias venezolanas no han tenido ingresos desde que comenzó la inmovilización social obligatoria y muchas han perdido sus trabajos. Las evaluaciones confirman que el acceso a los alimentos es la principal prioridad de las familias venezolanas, y para acceder a ellos adoptan estrategias negativas como comer alimentos más baratos o menos preferidos, pedir alimentos prestados y en algunos casos, mendigar dinero para obtener alimentos.
En ese contexto se planteó el proyecto “RESPONDER A LAS NECESIDADES INMEDIATAS DE LOS MIGRANTES/REFUGIADOS DE VENEZUELA EN EL CONTEXTO DE COVID-19”, el cual fue financiado por Start Fund
La intervención permitió a los organismos asociados atender las necesidades más inmediatas e insatisfechas de los migrantes venezolanos en Lima- zona con el mayor número de casos y el mayor número de migrantes venezolanos en situación de vulnerabilidad- a través de la entrega única de “Entrega de efectivo multipropósito incondicional” o “distribución de una canasta de alimentos con raciones para 15 días” y de información sobre prevención frente al COVID-19, protección y sensibilización psicosocial. Read More...

Fiji Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis COVID-19 and TC Harold

The COVID-19 pandemic declared by the World Health Organisation on 11 March 2020 is presenting tremendous challenges globally due to its devastating impacts. While Fiji only had 18 cases of COVID-19, all of whom have recovered, the economic and social outcomes are significant and will be felt for years to come. The closure of international borders led to visitor arrivals contracting significantly by 43.5 percent up to April and the economy is projected to decline by 4.9% in 2020 under COVID-19. The impacts will extend to government revenue, which is expected to decrease by almost 50% in the next financial year.

In addition to the pandemic, Fiji was also struck by Severe Tropical Cyclone Harold on 08 April, causing States of Natural Disaster to be declared for COVID-19 and for TC Harold within the same week. Although Fiji is used to cyclones, prevention and movement restriction measures in place for COVID-19 made it difficult to respond to the trail of destruction left by the Category 4 cyclone. A total of 250 evacuation centers were opened in all four divisions and around 10,000 people were displaced.

The objectives of the Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis are:

- To analyse and understand the different impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic and TC Harold potentially have on women, men, girls and boys, people with disabilities and people of diverse SOGIESC and other marginalised groups in Fiji;

- To inform humanitarian programming in Fiji based on the different needs of women, men, boys and girls, people with disabilities and people of diverse SOGIESC with a particular focus on Gender Based Violence (GBV), Health, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), Education in Emergencies, Food Security and Livelihoods, and Coping Strategies; and

- To provide recommendations for organisations responding to COVID-19 and TC Harold.
Read More...

Raks Thai Rapid Gender Analysis Gendered Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Migrants in Thailand

Although a number of reports on migrants have recently been released, these have mostly been based on secondary data and stakeholder perspectives, whereas this study aims to give voice to migrants through primary data collection and seeks to provide migrants an opportunity to directly addresses their struggle during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, this Rapid Gender Analysis utilizes a qualitative methodology to identify the differing impact on male and female migrants.
Being away from home during this pandemic, migrants in Thailand are likely to lack access to support services. Furthermore, the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to affect migrant women disproportionately due to harmful gender norms of the host country. Read More...

A Glimpse on Poor and Extreme Poor Pregnant and Lactating Women’s Situation in Sunamganj, amidst COVID-19

The global pandemic COVID19 outbreak has crippled the economy after the nationwide lockdown imposed by the Bangladesh government since the end of March 2020 and has thrown millions of its population into poverty and food insecurity. Sunamganj, district is highly susceptible to natural hazards such as heavy rain, storm, thunderstorm, flash flood, which severely affect their livelihood and food and nutrition security where the COVID19 crisis has speeded up the devastation of daily livelihood. While writing this report the total number of infected corona patients in Sunamganj was 1162 and nine died. To better understand how pregnant and lactating women in the poor and the extremely poor household of Sunamganj district, are experiencing and adapting during this COVID 19 crisis, Collective Impact for Nutrition (CI4N), CARE Bangladesh conducted a rapid mobile-based survey from May 14 to 23, 2020. This report represents unofficial survey findings to keep a finger on the pulse of the food and nutrition security situation in rural Bangladesh. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

CARE Zimbabwe Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID-19

Zimbabwe has not been spared by the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID 19). The coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan, the capital city in the Hubei province of China in December 2019. The disease has since spread to every corner of the world causing serious health and socio-economic challenges. As of 31st May, Zimbabwe had recorded 174 confirmed cases and 4 deaths.
CARE carried out a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) to assess the immediate and anticipated adverse impacts of COVID-19 on men, women, boys and girls. The assessment was conducted in geographical areas where CARE is implementing its portfolio of development including food security and nutrition, WASH, education, resilience and humanitarian programs. A qualitative methodology was applied and primary data was collected through key informant interviews, and supplemented by a desk review. Primary data was collected remotely using phones and emails. The team could not go on the ground due to the introduction of a COVID -19 national lockdown that initiated on the 30th of March 2020, and also in compliance with WHO and organisational guidelines on the prevention of the spread of coronavirus Read More...

Northeast Nigeria Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19

Even before the impact of the COVID- 19 pandemic, the crisis in Northeast Nigeria is one of the most severe in the world today. In the 3 most affected states in 2020, 7.9 million out of 13 million people needed humanitarian assistance—up 11% from 2019. 79% of the displaced people are women and children.
Compounding this crisis, by July 2, 2020, Nigeria reported 26,484 cases and 603 deaths—a dramatic growth in cases over the month of June. While men make up 68% of the cases, women are bearing a higher burden of mobility restrictions, economic loss, and restricted access to services.
This Rapid Gender Analysis reviewed secondary data and conducted interviews with 109 people between May 6th and May 21st, 2020 in the three Northeast states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe where UN Women, CARE International and Oxfam operate. Read More...

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Global Trends June 2020

In the three months since CARE released its first Rapid Gender Analysis of COVID-19, the situation has evolved quickly and spread globally. CARE has continued to closely monitor this situation, by conducting context-specific analyses in 5 regions covering 64 countries. This has included conversations and data collection with more than 4,500 women.
This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis. It also reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls—and for men and boys—as the crisis deepens. Our recent research reveals:
• The highest immediate priorities 3 months into the crisis are food, income, and rights—including concerns around Gender Based Violence, caregiving burdens, and mobility. Women and girls show these needs most acutely, but they also rise to the top of men and boys’ priorities in COVID-19.
• Women’s burdens are increasing. As frontline workers in the health system, as survivors of Gender Based Violence, as the people primarily responsible for food, cleaning, and childcare—especially with schools closed, women confirm that their burdens are rising, and so is the stress around them.
• Women are displaying remarkable leadership, but are still unable to access most decision-making, around COVID-19 and around daily life. They are also quickly approaching the end of their safety nets.
In this context, this document provides updated recommendations to focus on lessening the immediate impact on women and providing the chance to build back equal. These recommendations cluster around:
• Urgently addressing top priorities of food, income, and rights by expanding safety nets—both in the immediate response and in long-term ways for all people to provide their own food and livelihoods.
• Reducing women’s burdens by providing extra support for caregiving, services for GBV prevention and response, and investing in women healthcare workers.
• Prioritizing women’s leadership by creating space for women leaders at all levels of the response, and consistently listening to women’s perspectives and data as the crisis evolves.
Read More...

Indonesia Rapid Gender Assessment in Response to COVID-19

Following the first reported COVID-19 case in Indonesia, Yayasan CARE Peduli (YCP) had immediately started to prepare its response package to support communities in areas where it operates. Given the mobility restriction, it had been quite challenging to prepare the response package particularly in preceding the response with much more detailed field-based needs assessment. This Rapid Gender Assessment (RGA) was prepared almost simultaneously with the delivery of the first stage of the response. While it has been limited in its use for the first stage response, it is intended to guide YCP’s next stage of response which will be aimed at mitigating the social economic impact of COVID-19, emphasizing the needs of women and access to the support. This RGA will serve as the basis for further in-depth study or assessment to support detailed design of the support schemes and other assessments that other development partners are planning to undertake.
Information on the local situation and needs were gathered from the projects’ database and information from the local governments and partners. Therefore, the first stage of YCP’s response consist of preventive and protective measures from the virus transmission which was aimed at the communities in general.
Specifically, the RGA has the following objectives:
1. To analyze the impact of COVID-19 and the needs of the communities especially the vulnerable groups such as women and children, the elderlies, people with disabilities and other vulnerabilities;
2. To inform the design of COVID-19 response based on the identified needs of the different groups, focusing on: (i) paid and unpaid productive works; (ii) gender relations and decision-making process; (iii) basic services; (iv) safety and security with respect to gender-based violence; (v) influence of faith and religion; (vi) access to information and technology; (vii) WASH and livelihood; and (viii) child protection and education. Read More...

Iraq COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis

As of June 2020, Iraq is experiencing drastic increase in the number of people who contracted COVID-19 compared to the preceding months. With the everchanging context of COVID-19, women, girls, men and boys in Iraq have been affected differently; and they developed different coping mechanisms. Furthermore, their roles within households have been directly impacted by the crisis, and their participation and access to services also have reflected the gendered dynamics of the COVID-19. There has been an increase in the protection and gender-based violence risks identified and reported, and women and girls are disproportionately affected by these risks. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all