Emergency|Humanitarian Aid

Emergency Assistance and Safe Spaces for Crisis Affected People in Jordan

After the outbreak of the Syrian conflict in 2011, millions of Syrians fled to neighboring countries in search of refuge. Over 668,123 fled to Jordan, of which 8 in 10 are living outside of refugee camps. Since 2011, CARE Jordan has taken a leading role in responding to the needs of this population, conducting annual assessments of the Syrian urban refugee population in Jordan to tailor programming to refugees’ most pressing needs. Building upon these findings, CARE Jordan launched the Emergency Assistance and Safe Spaces for Crisis Affected People in Jordan project with funding from the Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Border protection (DIBP) between July 2016 and July 2018. CARE Jordan partnered with local CBOs to implement the project, which has an overall goal of enhancing socio-economic wellbeing and quality of life for the refugee and host population in Jordan. Specifically, the project aimed to: (1) increase access to sustainability livelihoods for Syrian refugee and host community women; (2) improve the psycho-social coping mechanisms of vulnerable individuals; (3) increase the access of Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian host populations to emergency cash assistance; and (4) increase the access of Syrian refugees and vulnerable host populations to information, case management and protection support. [52 pages] Read More...

Rapport de l’Analyse Rapide Genre Sur l’Assistance aux Populations Réfugiées, Deplacees, et Les Populations Hote dans la Region de Diffa

La crise qui perdure au Nord du Nigéria et dans le Sud-est du Niger a entraîné un déplacement massif de populations dans la région de Diffa où une personne sur trois est déplacée. En effet, les premières vagues de réfugiés sont arrivées du Nigeria il y a deux ans mais depuis avril 2015, les incursions sanglantes et répétées des insurgés au Niger ont provoqué d’importants déplacements de populations. Par conséquent, une multitude de camps informels longent désormais le goudron de la route nationale. [20 pages] Read More...

Evaluation Finale Externe de l’Initiative “Strengthening Access for Livelihoods and Basic Services- Sale-Base”

Le projet SALI BASE exécuté par CARE Niger de juin 2017 à mai 2018 a pour objectif principal d‘atténuer l'impact du conflit dans le nord-est du Nigeria et accroître la résilience des personnes déplacées et des communautés hôtes dans les départements du Maine Soroa, Diffa et N'guigmi dans la région de Diffa. Après 12 mois d’exécution en collaboration étroite avec deux ONG nationales partenaires de mise en œuvre (DEMI-E et AFV) et des services techniques déconcentrés, le projet a pu réaliser toutes les activités prévues à des taux oscillant entre 100% et 160%. [57 pages] Read More...

Shelter Project Performance Report

Between May and December 2016 (phase I), CARE and UNHCR provided safe, durable shelter to 531 families (1,917 people of concern) who had fled conflict in Mozambique. After starting with a transitional model using tarpaulins and blue gum poles, CARE worked with local skilled and unskilled labourers to upgrade the transitional models or create new semi-permanent shelters with mud brick walls and roofing comprised of iron sheets. The project also established kitchen gardens to support the nutrition and provide limited income generation for interested households. [12 pages] Read More...

Emergency cash transfers, nutrition and livelihood assistance for chronically food insecure households in Malawi (2016-17)

In May 2016, the Government of Malawi (GoM), assessed 6.5 million people out of total population of 16.8M (39 percent) would not be able to meet their annual food requirements during the 2016/17 consumption period. Additionally, over 1.8 million people were in need of agricultural inputs to restore their livelihoods. About 31 per cent of the cultivated land was affected by the drought, of which 13 per cent was severely affected. Poor nutrition and increased mortality rates were of particular concern in 24 out of a total of 28 districts. Approximately 975,000 children aged 6-23 months and pregnant and lactating women were particularly at risk of food insecurity and malnutrition and requiring nutritional treatment.

The high level of food insecurity was due to two consecutive years of below average production of all key agricultural crops. In 2014/15 Malawi had the worst growing season for seven years, and this was followed by the worst floods in history in January 2015 and then widespread prolonged dry spells. Malawi was then severely impacted by one of the strongest El Niño events in 35 years. This climactic phenomenon has brought below average rainfall in the central and southern regions, and higher than normal rainfall in the north of the country. In response the food insecurity, the President of Malawi declared a state of disaster on 12 April 2016.

In order to address the significant challenges posed by El Niño in Malawi, CARE proposed a comprehensive cash transfer, nutrition and livelihoods response to reduce the vulnerability crisis-affected people, especially women, girls and boys in Salima. The project focuses on three immediate outcomes. First, the project will improve capacity of at-risk populations to meet basic needs and reduce negative coping strategies through cash transfers. Second, the project will focus on improving the nutritional status of women and children through awareness raising, demonstrations of best practices related to food preparing and provision of kitchen garden inputs. Finally, the project will increase the self-reliance of at risk population through the provision of seeds and tools as well as training on post-distribution harvest and storage techniques. [19 pages]
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Emergency Assistance and Safe Spaces for Crisis Affected People in Jordan

After the outbreak of the Syrian conflict in 2011, millions of Syrians fled to neighboring countries in search of refuge. Over 668,123 fled to Jordan, of which 8 in 10 are living outside of refugee camps. Since 2011, CARE Jordan has taken a leading role in responding to the needs of this population, conducting annual assessments of the Syrian urban refugee population in Jordan to tailor programming to refugees’ most pressing needs. Building upon these findings, CARE Jordan launched the Emergency Assistance and Safe Spaces for Crisis Affected People in Jordan project with funding from the Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Border protection (DIBP) between July 2016 and July 2018. CARE Jordan partnered with local CBOs to implement the project, which has an overall goal of enhancing socio-economic wellbeing and quality of life for the refugee and host population in Jordan. Specifically, the project aimed to: (1) increase access to sustainability livelihoods for Syrian refugee and host community women; (2) improve the psycho-social coping mechanisms of vulnerable individuals; (3) increase the access of Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian host populations to emergency cash assistance; and (4) increase the access of Syrian refugees and vulnerable host populations to information, case management and protection support. [52 pages] Read More...

‘Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services (ECRHS) Project in Sierra Leone’ Midterm Report

The Epidemic Control and Reinforcement of Health Services (ECRHS) project is funded by the German Development Cooperation (KfW) as a direct response to the Ebola outbreak, for the period 1 November 2015 to 31 May 2017. ECRHS reaches 400 communities in the four northern districts of Bombali (100), Tonkilili (110), Kambia (90) and Koinadugu (100), where the Ebola outbreak was prominent. ECRHS also reaches 233 Peripheral Health Units (PHU) located in these districts. [46 pages] Read More...

DEC Supported Emergency Response Project in Amran and Abyan Governorates, Yemen

Under the Yemen Crisis Appeal and with the support from Disasters Emergency Committee, CARE Yemen has been implementing two emergency response projects in Abyan and Amran Governorates of Yemen with the aim of responding to the WASH, food insecurity and Cholera/Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) Crisis. This report provides the findings of the evaluation of the two phases of the DEC funded emergency response projects in Sawyer districts of Amran Governorate, Yemen.
The overall purpose of this evaluation was to ensure accountability and identify lessons learned and best practices so as to feed into and inform the decision making process of the project stakeholders, including the donor, beneficiaries, and government counterparts. In addition, the evaluation aimed to objectively assess the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of the project in light of its objectives and provide recommendations for future programming. Furthermore, the evaluation assessed how the project ensured accountability to affected groups, considering the commitments of the Core Humanitarian Standards, and how the project ensured quality of implementation vis-à-vis emergency response standards such as SPHERE. [72 pages]
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Integrated Shelter Improvements for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities in Tripoli, Lebanon: Phase II

Final program narrative report for Integrated Shelter Improvements for Syrian Refugees and Host Communities in Tripoli, Lebanon: Phase II. [25 pages] Read More...

Evaluation of Lifesaving Shelter, Protection, and Health Support for South Sudanese Refugees

This evaluation was designed using a mixed method approach, employing systematic review of documents and Most Significant Change (MSC) technique, adapted from Davies and Dart’s most significant change guide to collect change stories at individual, family and community level from 24 project beneficiaries (8 women on SRMCH; 2 males, 6 female PSNs on Shelter; 1 male, 7 females on GBV). The MSC interviews focused on documenting change. Eight (8) Key Informant Interviews were also conducted with the CARE Program, MEAL, and UNHCR OPM staff. Read More...

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