Gender Equality

COVID-19: Impacts, Attitudes, and Safety Nets in Haiti (April 2021)

In April 2021, CARE conducted interviews with savings group members and leaders to understand their experiences of COVID-19, and how it was changing their lives. The survey included 364 women and 175 men, for a total of 539 respondents. This follows a survey done in June 2020 to understand what was happening at that time for members of savings groups. The surveys covered Artibonite and Grand Anse.

COVID-19 continues to have important impacts for women and men in savings groups. In general, men and women in these groups were reporting similar challenges across the sample. 86% of women and men are reporting impacts in their livelihoods, and 98% of people say that COVID-19 is affecting their ability to save. 64% say they can’t meet family needs and hunger has gone up. 90% of people are reporting that COVID-19 is impacting their social lives. More women than men report that Gender Based Violence has gone up. While women are more likely to have lost influence in the household than men (39% compared to 33%), men are more likely to report that they lost social status in the community (48% compared to 43%). Read More...

CARESOM RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS AUGUST 2021

This RGA aimed to gather gender-related information especially gender roles, responsibilities, barriers, misconceptions, social norms, policies, and support systems available for survivors of Gender-Based Violence. The analysis covers five geographical areas within Somalia (Somaliland, Puntland, Galmudug, South West and Banadir) comprising 10 regions and 20 districts. This analysis employed both a qualitative and quantitative assessment using desk reviews, household questionnaires, Focus Group Discussions(FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), and individual stories. In total, 2,437 households were interviewed (72.5% female and 27.5% male) while 51 FGDs and 26 KIIs were conducted. The assessment was conducted within CARE Somalia Program areas and households were randomly selected while FGDs and KIIs participants were purposively selected based on gender, age, availability, location and knowledge of topics under investigation. Data was collected by 36 enumerators (16 females and 20 males) using KOBO Collect and analysed using SPSS, PowerBI and Excel. The findings have been presented using graphs, tables, maps, descriptive and inferential statistics. Below are the key findings and recommendations from the assessment. [50 Pages] Read More...

Analyse Rapide Genre : Tremblement de terre du 14 août en Haïti

Haïti est enclin à des catastrophes naturelles de plusieurs sortes : cyclones, tempêtes tropicales, éboulements, inondations et tremblement de terre. En moins de douze ans, deux terribles tremblements de terre ont secoué le pays, entrainant des dommages énormes en vie humaine et en perte de toute sorte. Alors que le pays ne s’était pas encore remis des séquelles du premier séisme de magnitude 7.0 en 2010, un deuxième de magnitude 7.2 vient s’abattre le 14 août 2021 au sud du pays dont la plupart des sections communales affectées sont enclavées et difficiles d’accès. Selon le Gouvernement d’Haiti, on peut à date dénombrer 2 248 morts, 12 763 blessés et 329 personnes portées disparues.
Cette catastrophe vient augmenter le lot des préoccupations auxquelles est confrontée la société haïtienne en pleine crise politique, suite à la mort du président de la République en juillet 2021 et au cœur de toute sorte d’insécurité dont le kidnapping. Le pays continue à faire face à la COVID-19 qui a entrainé 588 morts sur un total de 21 124 cas, craignant jusqu’à présent des conséquences qui seraient dues aux éventuelles variantes. Ce désastre qui frappe sévèrement tous les secteurs d’activités de la vie nationale est également survenu en pleine saison cyclonique et à la veille de la rentrée scolaire. Il vient instaurer une situation humanitaire que les leçons tirées des crises antérieures permettront de mieux gérer.
C’est dans ce contexte particulièrement complexe qu’ONU Femmes et CARE, sous le leadership du Ministère à la Condition féminine et aux Droits des femmes (MCFDF) et en coordination avec la Direction Générale de la Protection Civile (DGPC), ont lancé l’Analyse Rapide Genre qui se veut une évaluation rapide de l’impact du tremblement de terre d’août 2021 sur les femmes, les hommes, les filles et les garçons, incluant les personnes en situation de vulnérabilité, afin d’éclairer la réponse humanitaire en cours en Haïti dans l’immédiat, ainsi que les efforts de redressement à moyen et à long terme. Cette étude est faite en partenariat avec l’Equipe spéciale genre de l’équipe humanitaire en Haiti et a obtenu le soutien financier, technique et logistique des partenaires suivantes : Fondation Toya, IDEJEN, UNFPA, OCHA, OMS/OPS, ONUSIDA, PAM, PNUD, et UNICEF.
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Empowering Women to Claim their Inheritance Rights: Post-Project Impact Analysis

Between January 2013 to June 2016, CARE International Egypt implemented a project addressing “Empowering women to claim Inheritance Rights (WIN)”. This project was funded by the European Commission under the Gender Equality Programme and aimed to strengthen the access of women particularly those in Upper Egypt to gain access and control over their economic rights, resources and opportunities through their lawful inheritance.

The objectives of this impact evaluation was to:
1. Quantify the Impact achieved as the result of the Amended Inheritance Law in terms of people whose rights to a life free from (economic) violence is being fulfilled to a greater degree than before the amended Inheritance law.
2. Assess and analyse if/how the introduction of criminalization and penalties in the Inheritance Law have enhanced the application of the amended Inheritance Law to date and provide recommendations on how its application can be further improved/strengthened.
3. Identify and analyse non intended effects both positive or negative, of the Amended Inheritance Law with regards to women property rights through inheritance.

Extrapolating the model to the published data on vital statistics, agricultural statistics and income expenditure published by the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics of 2016 through 2019 reveals that the application of the new amendment of the law potentially results in nearly 34,000 more women who can have access to their inheritance annually.

Based on feedback from women’s’ activists interviewed, the effect of COVID-19 and the closure of courts on the number of women affected was believed to be negligible. Many of these cases are extremely complex and usually take many years in courts and hence would not be significantly affected by this delay.

As inferred from the feedback of key informants, it is too early to to identify positive impacts of the law amendment, however, they highlighted some threats that might hinder the achievement of the desired impact of the law amendment.
- The long duration of the legal dispute and associated legal costs
- Procedural pitfalls
- Socio cultural barriers Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis, Drought in Afghanistan July 2021

Afghanistan has experienced periodic drought over the past 30 years, but none occurring simultaneously with widespread insecurity and a global pandemic—until now. The combined effects of this “triple crisis” are gravely affecting people throughout the country. Knowing that crises affect different groups of people in different ways, CARE Afghanistan conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) from June–July 2021 to assess the gendered effects of the drought, using primary and secondary data. CARE conducted in-person surveys with 352 participants (63.5% female, 36.5% male) in Balkh, Ghazni, Herat, and Kandahar; focus group discussions with 220 women; and key informant interviews with 20 people (20% women and 80% men). Read More...

Host Community Situation Analysis Impact of Rohingya Influx on Host Communities in Ukhia and Teknaf

Bangladesh became host to what is now the biggest refugee camp in the whole world. By November 2017 836,487 FDMN (Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Nationals) fled across the Myanmar-Bangladesh border to settle here mostly in two Upazilas:Ukhia and Teknaf of Cox's Bazar district. By January 2018, it became clear that this would be a prolonged crisis lasting years as the Myanmar government continued dithering about taking them back, and as also the FDMN expressed their unwillingness to go back fearing persecution. As a result of this huge and sudden influx, lives and livelihoods of the host communities have been affected in many ways. Therefore, this Situational Assessment aims to assess both the visible economic and the subtle social impacts of the recent influx on the host communities. Using Oxford’s integration conceptual framework, this assessment has been conducted to chalk out CARE Bangladesh’s future response to the refugee crisis by involving the host communities in the process and addressing their concerns so that the tension between the two communities is defused rather than intensified.
Presence of the refugees has brought about many social and economic changes creating massive pressure on the host communities. Economic activities in the two upazilas have gone through transitions, leading to the emergence of a new market system and reducing employment opportunities for the host communities.
On one hand prices of essentials have shot up almost twice as much, and on the other, due to an unpredictably large number of refugees entering the local labor market wages for day laborers have gone down. Though refugees are living in highly congested camps, they are getting aid materials as well as economic opportunity in the local market. On the contrary, the host communities are finding themselves pitted against the refugees as either their work have been taken away or their earnings significantly reduced. It is true that a few locally influential people owning large tracts of land and businesses are benefitting from the availability of cheap labor, but the poor and the ultra-poor from the host communities are bearing the brunt of these changes. Access to administrative, educational and healthcare needs has diminished. Reduced access and availability of CPR-resultant scarcity of timber, bamboo for shelter, food & cooking fuel created insecurity of accessing resources. Due to security risk of woman and girls mobility has goes down, women income earning opportunity getting reduced; all of this has evidently created tension between the host and the refugee communities and within host community households. If left unaddressed, this tension is likely to rise to the extent of creating potential threats of ethnic conflicts.
In response to these findings of the situational analysis possible types of interventions could be Gender specific livelihoods strengthening initiatives based on diversification of off/on farm activities, Transformative approach to build life free from GBV, Promoting youth leadership and Strengthening service delivery and demand side functions through Inclusive governance.
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Estudio de Base del Proyecto “MUJERES RESILIENTES: NUEVAS OPORTUNIDADES PARA SU REACTIVACIÓN ECONÓMICA E INCLUSIÓN FINANCIERA EN RESPUESTA AL IMPACTO DE LA CRISIS DEL COVID-19”

El presente estudio de base es elaborado con el objetivo de medir la situación inicial PROYECTO “MUJERES RESILIENTES: NUEVAS OPORTUNIDADES PARA SU REACTIVACIÓN ECONÓMICA E INCLUSIÓN FINANCIERA EN RESPUESTA AL IMPACTO DE LA CRISIS DEL COVID-19”, el cual viene siendo ejecutado por CARE Perú. Para el desarrollo del estudio se implementó una metodología predominantemente cuantitativa que emplea principalmente fuente y técnica de recojo de información de naturaleza cuantitativa. El ámbito geográfico del estudio de base comprende las zonas donde actualmente interviene el proyecto, las cuales involucra 38 distritos en los departamentos de Arequipa, La Libertad y Lima. Las principales variables analizadas se corresponden con el contexto local distrital en el que opera el proyecto, con características básicas del público objetivo (características personales de las beneficiarias, de sus hogares, acceso a servicios y afectación por el COVID-19), los cambios esperados por el proyecto como estrategia de intervención (capacidades técnicas, estrategias de mercado, servicios financieros) y la transversalización de género. Estas variables se analizaron en la población objetivo del proyecto. Los informantes que proporcionaron la información requerida para el estudio fueron principalmente las mujeres emprendedoras inscritas en el Proyecto. En este grupo de informantes se aplicaron 302 encuestas a mujeres emprendedoras y se complementó con siete entrevistas a funcionarios públicos de Municipios y Programas Públicos. Para el recojo de información, se diseñó un total de 3 formatos de recojo de información primaria, los cuales fueron aplicados durante los meses de mayo y junio del 2021, con algunas limitaciones propias de una aplicación por teléfono (llamadas no contestadas, servicios suspendidos, números equivocados) y otras referentes a la disponibilidad del informante (rechazo directo, falta de tiempo). [90 Pages]
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Rapid Needs Assessment Gaza May/June 2021

CARE conducted a rapid needs assessment in Gaza between May 28 and June 3, 2021 to understand people's evolving needs in the crisis there. This graphic underlines what they found, with a survey of 62 people, including 68% women, 32% men, and 16% people with disabilities. Read More...

EXAMINING WOMEN AND GIRLS’ SAFE SPACES (WGSS) IN HUMANITARIAN CONTEXTS: Research Findings from Northwest Syria and South Sudan

Gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian contexts represents a global issue of grave concern, disproportionately affecting women and girls. In light of its detrimental impact on the health, well-being and development of survivors, the international community has placed a strong priority on combatting and responding to GBV in all its forms.
Women and Girls’ Safe Spaces (WGSS) are among the most widely implemented GBV prevention and response programming interventions globally. In spite of their popularity and potential to increase the well-being, safety, and empowerment of women and girls, there is a lack of rigorous evidence regarding the role of these spaces in the lives of participants. Building an evidence base is particularly crucial in order to understand the impact and effectiveness of WGSS as an intervention and determine ways in which existing programming can be adapted to increase overall quality.
In response to the crucial need for evidence around WGSS programming globally, CARE USA conducted a study to examine the effectiveness of WGSS in the lives of women and girls in two conflict-affected settings, Northwest Syria and South Sudan. These locations are particularly relevant for this research as the selected study sites are home to a large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs), and are settings in which women and girls face a significant risk of experiencing GBV. These contexts are also ones in which CARE has existing WGSS interventions in place. Read More...

CASH AND VOUCHER ASSISTANCE IN RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

In April 2020, CARE received a five million dollar grant from MARS to implement a multi-country program, including Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Peru, Thailand, and Venezuela1, with the aim of reducing the negative impacts of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations, especially women and girls, using complementary and multimodal approaches. A key activity of this program was the provision of cash and voucher assistance (CVA) to vulnerable populations to meet their diverse basic needs. Program data indicated that CVA was implemented in Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, and Thailand. Monitoring data from different countries showed that CVA was unconditional; with cash modality representing 95% of transfers. Key targets populations for CVA activities vary by country and include: vulnerable households (Cote d’Ivoire, and Haiti); migrants and refugees (Honduras, Ecuador, and Thailand); domestic workers (Guatemala and Ecuador); survivors of GBV and other forms of violence against women (Guatemala and Ecuador); and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer/questioning (LGBTQI+) individuals (Ecuador). Across all projects (or countries), participants reported numerous uses of CVA including purchase foods stuff, payment of health services, hygiene services, rental/housing, savings and livelihoods activities.
Given the nature and scale of this program as well as its organizational commitment to learning, CARE was keen to understand the extent to which the project supported and protected vulnerable populations against the loss or disruption of their livelihoods in a gender sensitive manner. The study seeks to provide open-source learnings for peer
companies and agencies on how CVA was utilized in this program with two major questions: (i) How gender sensitive was the process for CARE’s CVA? (ii) How gender sensitive was the intended outcome of CARE’s CVA?
This documentation report compiles lessons from across the projects implemented in the targeted countries and draws from the diversity of their experiences to provide some recommendations on more gender sensitive CVA in the future. Read More...

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