Gender Equality

Partenariat Contre le Trafic, l’Exploitation des Enfants et les Violences faites aux Filles aux Femmes (PACTE)

This evaluation of the Project “Partnership Against Trafficking, Exploitation and Violence Against Girls and Women (PACTE for Children and Women)” comes at the end of 36 months of implementation of activities carried out in the project. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Philippines: Metro Manila

The NCR Rapid Gender Assessment (NCR RGA) summarises the gendered impact of the pandemic by putting into perspective the experiences of women, men, girls, and boys from different urban poor communities in Metro Manila. It recognizes the distinct situation created by urban poverty alongside the COVID-19 crisis. The NCR RGA contributes to surfacing knowledge by providing
a space for dialogue and recognising the value of stories to understanding the COVID-19 situation.
The NCR RGA was an inter-agency initiative coordinated by CARE, with participating INGOs Oxfam Pilipinas, Plan International,
Asmae; local organizations ACCORD Inc., ChildHope, Kanlungan sa Er-ma Ministry Inc.; and individual volunteers from DFAT. Agencies served as, or recruited, locally-based interviewers with backgrounds in community organizing or social work. RGA and Kobo orientations, toolkit training and simulation, and regular debriefings were facilitated virtually by CARE to support interviewers in data collection. As this assessment was during enhanced community quarantine in Metro Manila, face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions were not possible. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS TO INFORM THE 2021 HUMANITARIAN PROGRAMME CYCLE IN THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY

The impacts of humanitarian crises are not gender neutral. Global evidence shows that when disasters strike, and humanitarian crises unfold, they have differential impacts on women, girls, men, boys and persons of diverse gender identities. Humanitarian response informed by gender analysis means that humanitarian action incorporates recommendations drawn from that robust analysis, which identifies the shifting needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys. A recent report1 from the OCHA Gender Unit identified that several Humanitarian Needs Overviews (HNOs) and Humanitarian Response Plans (HRPs) had made progress in utilising and integrating gender analysis into the humanitarian response planning process but that more progress could still be made, specifically by improving sector-specific gender analysis and the application of that analysis to specific sectoral interventions. The same report identified that the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt) Humanitarian Programme Cycle (HPC) documents had made considerable progress towards gender integration and gender sensitive programming, but that more sectoral and cross cutting work could still be done since, overwhelmingly, the majority of gender analysis continued to focus on traditional areas associated with “women’s issues” such as gender-based violence (GBV), sexual and reproductive health (SRH), and maternal health.
This synthesis report is produced by CARE in partnership with OCHA. It is part of efforts to ensure a more systematic gender analysis is accessible, and utilised, throughout the 2021 HPC process. Drawing on the 2020 oPt HNO and HRP, as well as the Gender Unit’s review of several 2020 HNOs, this document synthesizes recent2 CARE Palestine West Bank/Gaza and OCHA generated gender analysis reports with the aim of helping HPC actors better integrate gender analysis into the planning process. Read More...

The Double Day: Exploring unpaid work and care for female garment workers in Bangladesh

The UK Government funded Work and Opportunities for Women (WOW) Programme is a five-year initiative to enhance the economic empowerment of 300,000 women working in global value chains by 2022. WOW is delivered by a consortium comprised of BSR, CARE International, the University of Manchester, and Social Development Direct, and led by PwC.

WOW’s approach to reaching women workers is through partnerships with multinational companies and business initiatives to improve women’s participation in their supply chains. One such partnership is with a fashion retailer who expressed an interest in learning more about the unpaid care that female garment workers in their supply chains carry out—recognising it as a major barrier to women’s economic participation.

The WOW alliance entered into a collaborative partnership with the company to undertake original primary research into the unpaid work and care burden facing female garment workers in Bangladesh.
The research has been collated into an external report – The Double Day – launched in July 2020 by the WOW Alliance.
Read More...

Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan (HAMORIS – 2017-2021) Midterm Report and Summary CI Timor-Leste

The Hamenus Mortalidade no Risku ba Inan Sira (HAMORIS) project is funded by the Australian Government and implemented by CARE International Timor-Leste. Focused on the municipalities of Ermera and Covalima, the project aims to address the high number of women who die during childbirth in Timor-Leste, which has one of the highest rates of maternal death in the world, by improving their access to and use of quality maternal health services. The HAMORIS project was launched in July 2017 and has been extended until June 2022. This is the midterm report and findings. Please also find a summary in English as well as Tetum. Read More...

Women and Girls Safe Spaces in Rohingya Camps

As the Rohingya Response of Bangladesh nears the two-year mark, the response has evolved from immediate emergency life-saving provisions to other supports (protection, health, nutrition etc). One aspect of this crisis is that majority are women and children (52% women & girls, 55% children under 18)(Rohingya Response Gender Analysis, Lulia, Mita et al, 2018) . Thus, responses specific to needs of women and girls are of crucial importance. At the heart of this are Women and Girls’ Safe Space (WGSS) locally called shantikhana (Center of Peace). As UNFPA defines:
“A safe space is a formal or informal place where women and girls feel physically and emotionally safe. The term ‘safe,’ in the present context, refers to the absence of trauma, excessive stress, violence (or fear of violence), or abuse. It is a space where women and girls, being the intended beneficiaries, feel comfortable and enjoy the freedom to express themselves without the fear of judgment or harm.”
CARE Bangladesh conducted an inter-agency study that analyzes collective experience of organizations serving survivors of GBV and other Rohingya women visiting WGSS to understand key successes, good practice, challenges and way-forward. Read More...

MEN AND BOYS AS PARTNERS IN PROMOTING GENDER EQUALITY AND PREVENTION OF YOUTH EXTREMISM AND VIOLENCE IN THE BALKANS

The Men and Boys as Partners in Promoting Gender Equality and Prevention of Youth Extremism and Violence in the Balkans or the Young Men’s Initiative II (YMI II) project is a follow-up to CARE’s comprehensive and programmatic effort to fight interpersonal and gender-based violence (GBV), as well as to improve gender equality in the region and address preventative issues related to youth extremism and violence.

The Endline Assessment was carried out to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the overall project progress, focusing on changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to gender-based violence, gender equality, healthy lifestyles amongst young men and young women from Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Albania and Kosovo* who participated in ‘Program Y’ in target schools in the period 2018-2020. The endline assessment examined the effects of project activities on: views regarding gender relations; health of young men and women, including mental health, use of psychoactive substances; knowledge about sexual reproductive health; experience of young people who suffered and perpetrated violence. Read More...

PROMOTING HEALTHIER LIFESTYLES AMONG YOUTH IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA BY CHALLENGING GENDER STEREOTYPES II – YOUNG MEN INITIATIVE PROJECT II (YMI II)

Young Men Initiative – Promoting Healthier Lifestyles among Youth in Bosnia and Herzegovina by Challenging Gender Stereotypes II or Young Men Initiative II (YMI II) project builds upon CARE´s comprehensive and programmatic effort to fight interpersonal and gender-based violence (GBV) as well as to improve gender equality in Bosnia and Herzegovina and address preventative issues related to youth extremism and violence. The project’s overall goal was to increase the uptake of healthy, nonviolent and gender-equitable lifestyles among young men and young women in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The endline survey is carried out to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the overall project progress focusing on changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviors related to gender-based violence, gender equality, healthy lifestyles among young men and young women from Bosnia and Herzegovina who were participating in the ‘Program Y’ in target schools in the period from 2018-2020. It assessed whether there were differences in attitudes, knowledge and behavior of young men and young women before and after the completion of the project activities in high schools. The endline survey examined the effects of project activities on the following spheres: views regarding gender relations; health of young men and young women, including mental health and the use of psychoactive substances; knowledge about sexual and reproductive health; experience of youngsters with suffered and perpetrated violence.
The project is organized and supported by CARE International, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and the Oak Foundation. It was implemented with the cooperation of local youth and non-governmental organizations: Association “XY” (Sarajevo), Perpetuum mobile – Institute for Youth and Community Development (Banja Luka), NGO “Youth Power” (Mostar) and youth NGOs: Forum Theatre (East Sarajevo), New Vision, (Novi Travnik), Otaharin (Bijeljina), Zemlja djece u BiH (Tuzla), Proni (Brčko), Youth Club “Pod istim suncem” (Jablanica).
Read More...

SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara Regional State

Introduction and Context of the Evaluation
This report refers to the midterm evaluation (MTE) of “SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project” funded by Austrian Development Cooperation through Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and implemented by CARE Ethiopia. The project was commenced in October 2017 and will be implemented through September 2020 in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara National Regional State. With the ultimate impact of “Chronically food insecure households in Belesa Woredas have improved food security and resiliency”, the project was designed and implemented to achieve the following outcomes.
i. Improved access to water resources for domestic consumption and productive use and enhanced and sustainable productivity of land for varied uses
ii. Vulnerable groups empowered to contribute productively in the household and community
iii. Local government capacitated and community empowered to initiate and lead community development and adaptive measures
The purpose of this mid-term evaluation was assessing the degree of success based on the five OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) standard evaluation parameters. Ten selected project intervention Kebeles from the two intervention Woredas were visited in this evaluation process. Participatory and multi-stage evaluation methods, data sources and triangulations were made to analyze the project status and measure the performance. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods were used to collect data from direct project beneficiaries such as chronically food insecure and drought affected people, rural women and girls, persons with disabilities, youth, relevant government sector and administrative offices at various levels and CARE. Overall, household survey was administered on 845 HHs and 14 KII, 21 FGDs, 20 direct observations and 16 in-depth interviews were made. The following description illustrates the summary of key midterm evaluation findings. Read More...

GEWEP II: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Programme II Final Report

GEWEP II works with and for poor and vulnerable women and girls. More than 8 160 000 women and girls live in our programme areas, and the end programme target is to directly work with 1 022 200.
The main impact is through Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs). The VSLA model came out of a pilot in Niger in the early 90s. Nearly 30 years later, there are more than 6.7 million VSLA members across the globe. Other organisations and governments have adopted CARE’s model, thereby multiplying impact. GEWEP continued to scale up VSLAs, and advocated for governments to recognize the model. The Governments of Burundi, DRC, Niger and Rwanda all recognize the important contribution of VSLAs to women’s economic empowerment, manifested within national strategies, policies and funds.
Women’s economic empowerment opens up for women’s participation. GEWEP supported women to come together and find confidence and common cause through VSLAs. We find VSLA women who actively participate in decision-making in formal structures, and who manage to stay there despite resistance from some men. This is the main success for women’s participation, across countries.
The shrinking space for civil society remains the most difficult challenge. In all countries, CARE’s main approach was to maintain good relations with those that are directly engaging with the field of women’s rights or who control the implementing areas or relevant political processes. This approach was successful in terms of preserving enough working space for CARE, GEWEP partners and other civil society actors working in the same field. Read More...

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